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United Ireland Poll - please vote

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Comments



  • Wow, interesting results. Obviously not scientific in any sense but who knows how this will go eventually...




  • How about they learn to stand on their own feet for 50 years in then let them decide. No influence from Dublin or London. A successful state of Northern Ireland, own currency, own tax funding a functioning economy.
    Then we'll talk.




  • Yes in theory but NI has to get on a serious development plan till it can cover its own pensions and welfare bill. We can't tax the south to pay for it.




  • "Assumptions - there is economic sense to it and that Ireland can afford it".

    Given those assumptions, you will get useless answers. NI is an economic basket case: merging with it would be crazy. That's as well as it being a political basket case.

    Under the GFA, does re-unification require a majority in the ROI as well as NI? A point often ignored.




  • Have two countries ever merged together successfully let alone peacefully?

    This is one Country...


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  • osarusan wrote: »
    Needs a 4th option along the lines of 'whenever everything is agreed' rather than 'within 10 years'.

    I don't believe we are within 10 years of a United Ireland.

    I read that, perhaps incorrectly, as once everything is agreed it should be within 10 years of that, rather than within the next 10 years from now. Nobody could honestly suggest that everything would be fully agreed and ready for a poll by 2031, could they?

    Either way, I voted no. Unless they discover the world's largest diamond mine under the Giant's Causeway that would independently sustain the NI economy for many years to come, we'd be basically destroying the Republic's economy to support a pipe dream, and for what purpose? Like what's it actually going to achieve, apart from there only being one country on the island? So what? There's also a significant portion of the population there that wouldn't want to be part of a united Ireland and would only be there under duress. They couldn't even count on the rest of Britain taking them in given how they've treated citizens of other countries they've left, most recently Hong Kong.




  • If there's a pro-UI vote in the north it will be a case of how it is brought about not if, regardless of a no vote.




  • I am kinda surprised how low the vote for UI be as i thought it be about 3-way tie yes/no/don't know'
    Personally today i do not know but when it be dressed up and the necessary political changed North and South i probably be yes.
    There seems to be no political will in this country for it to happen, the UK semm to be indifferent and it costs a wee-bit to run...




  • osarusan wrote: »
    Needs a 4th option along the lines of 'whenever everything is agreed' rather than 'within 10 years'.

    I don't believe we are within 10 years of a United Ireland.

    The way things are going it's not inconceivable that within ten years time, the EU could have gone to war with the UK and shared the England portion between Wales, Scotland and Ireland, all now separate states within the EU.




  • And lose the annual booze run to Newry? Madness.


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  • how can you vote on something that hasnt been discussed with all the options looked at?




  • Fred Cryton put his finger on the answer to why there has been no political will up to now...'extra SF voters'.

    That was the crippling fear of previous governments. The rise of SF has made it imperative that they try to gain ownership of a UI - hence the Shared Island Unit and Leo's very strong pro UI statements of late.




  • nudain wrote: »
    And lose the annual booze run to Newry? Madness.

    Halloween would be banger free at last. Although we'd have bigger explosions all year around.




  • don't want them
    don't need them
    cant pay for them
    brits can keep them
    the "republican" movements are a great outlet for the idiots of the country , it keep them out of the way most of the time




  • don't want them
    don't need them
    cant pay for them
    brits can keep them
    the "republican" movements are a great outlet for the idiots of the country , it keep them out of the way most of the time


    we definitely can pay for them, the current costs of northern ireland are uk specific costs and would not exist as part of a UI.




  • we definitely can pay for them, the current costs of northern ireland are uk specific costs and would not exist as part of a UI.

    https://www.irishnews.com/news/northernirelandnews/2019/09/17/news/united-ireland-would-cost-up-to-30-billion-a-year-and-collapse-north-s-economy--1714127/


    they haven't gone away you know ,
    still a massive organised crime gang masquerading as a political party requiring a lot of that investment for security




  • The poll is very heartening so far. A very definite no from me.




  • Not a chance. Why would we want to bring in another 300,000 SF voters into this country? Alongside about a million Unionists who hate all of us.

    It's as logical as saying why don't we merge our house with the neighbour house, and create a single family in a bigger house. Absurd and a recipe for disaster.

    Just wait until we talk about the taxes going up to pay for it. Won't be the shinners paying for it, will be the middle classes and the higher rate taxpayers.

    :eek:

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • The poll is very heartening so far. A very definite no from me.

    well remember regardless of how the poll ends the shinners will claim to have won anyway :pac::pac::pac:




  • we definitely can pay for them, the current costs of northern ireland are uk specific costs and would not exist as part of a UI.

    Have you factored in the amount of kerb-painting that we'd need down south, though? That's gotta add up.


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  • https://www.irishnews.com/news/northernirelandnews/2019/09/17/news/united-ireland-would-cost-up-to-30-billion-a-year-and-collapse-north-s-economy--1714127/


    they haven't gone away you know ,
    still a massive organised crime gang masquerading as a political party requiring a lot of that investment for security

    the current costs are around 12000000000 and falling, no way those costs would ever rise to 30000000000 under a UI, never mind rise full stop.
    they will go down dramatically as the uk specific costs such as all the contributions will no longer exist, not to mention the security bill is not going to be that big given millitant unionism is not far off being dead and the IRA are no more.




  • nudain wrote: »
    Have you factored in the amount of kerb-painting that we'd need down south, though? That's gotta add up.


    we could get the ffg and DUP politicians out to paint them and the catholic church to buy the paint.




  • Fred Cryton put his finger on the answer to why there has been no political will up to now...'extra SF voters'.

    That was the crippling fear of previous governments. The rise of SF has made it imperative that they try to gain ownership of a UI - hence the Shared Island Unit and Leo's very strong pro UI statements of late.

    Not only would we have the anchor around our necks of the North's economy, we'd have SF in power! The current banana republic would look like some sort of Jacque Fresco styled utopia in comparison.

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • the current costs are around 12000000000 and falling, no way those costs would ever rise to 30000000000 under a UI, never mind rise full stop.
    they will go down dramatically as the uk specific costs such as all the contributions will no longer exist, not to mention the security bill is not going to be that big given millitant unionism is not far off being dead and the IRA are no more.

    so you neither read the article

    understand the population difference between ROI and UK

    nor the political situation in NI

    still a valuable contributions about the kerbs :D




  • What can really be gained from a United Ireland truthfully, what is the point of it?

    Vanity project for politicians.




  • Feisar wrote: »
    Not only would we have the anchor around our necks of the North's economy, we'd have SF in power! The current banana republic would look like some sort of Jacque Fresco styled utopia in comparison.

    We have a Tanaiste under criminal investigation while we wait for the Moriarty Report after having just had Mother and Babies report and just after being driven off a cliff in 2008.

    Sure lets stick with that...eh?




  • We have a Tanaiste under criminal investigation while we wait for the Moriarty Report after having just had Mother and Babies report and just after being driven off a cliff in 2008.

    Sure lets stick with that...eh?

    Exactly, it'd seem idyllic compared to the madness!

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • If it does happen I'll be richer than Bezos, Cook and the rest of them as I have a business idea.
    I'm opening a chain of "fleg" shops.




  • Feisar wrote: »
    Exactly, it'd seem idyllic compared to the madness!

    One of the reasons FG FF have gotten away with it for so long are people like yourself.
    Carry on.


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  • Incomprehensible anyone looking at the basket case the North is would want or even be the slightest bit interested in uniting it with the 26 counties.

    I couldn't begin to figure out how the Republic could afford it and this before dealing with the loyalist backlash which would make the troubles seem like it was a Sunday picnic. If truth be really known, the Brits would be thrilled to see the back of it but just too cowardly to drop it like a bad habit.

    Is maith an scáthán súil charad.




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