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Run out of carb drops and it's bottling day!

  • 23-03-2018 11:52am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 123 ✭✭ murdog!


    I'm new to this game, just about to bottle my second batch and I've realised I only have enough carbonation drops for half the brew!

    So, should I:

    A) Bottle the half and wait for the carb drops to arrive? (should be with me on Monday/Tuesday)

    B) Leave the full brew in the bucket until the drops arrive and bottle then?

    C) Bottle today and use normal sugar for the second half?

    Advice greatly appreciated!


Comments

  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,405 Mod ✭✭✭✭ BeerNut


    Just use sugar. That's all carbonation drops are. It's a good opportunity to experiment with doses if you mark what's in each bottle.


  • Registered Users Posts: 123 ✭✭ murdog!


    Thanks, how much sugar are we talking per 500ml?


  • Registered Users Posts: 299 ✭✭ Hingo


    1/2 - 3/4 tsp. will do the job. if the style requires high carbonation (like a Belgian or Weiss) the higher side of that scale would work better.


  • Registered Users Posts: 123 ✭✭ murdog!


    That's great thanks, off to the shed!


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,791 ✭✭✭✭ hatrickpatrick


    Would ye just drop a teaspoon of sugar into each bottle and then bottle as normal? All the guides I found online talked about making a sugar solution in a container of water, which would have involved an extra round of sanitising, rinsing etc and then having to measure proper amounts etc. Carb drops seemed a simple alternative to this but if you can just drop a teaspoon of ordinary white or brown sugar directly into each bottle, that's easier still...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,627 ✭✭✭ monty_python


    Would ye just drop a teaspoon of sugar into each bottle and then bottle as normal? All the guides I found online talked about making a sugar solution in a container of water, which would have involved an extra round of sanitising, rinsing etc and then having to measure proper amounts etc. Carb drops seemed a simple alternative to this but if you can just drop a teaspoon of ordinary white or brown sugar directly into each bottle, that's easier still...
    That's why I use carb drops. Can't be arsed with the extra work making the sugar solution and making sure it's through mixed in with oxadizing the beer would be a pain


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,276 ✭✭✭ mordeith


    Just use a small spoon. If you can use a clean piece of paper to act as a funnel. Otherwise it can be hard stopping the sugar spilling around the top of the bottle


  • Registered Users Posts: 645 ✭✭✭ jamesbil


    I used to use a spoon in each bottle but it's never very consistent. Each bottle will be carbonated slightly differently.

    Now I just scald a small pan out with boiling water and disolve the correct ampont of sugar in a small amount of water, (200ml) I add this to th ebeer when I transfer it to my bottling barrel.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,145 ✭✭✭ aaronm13


    Batch priming is far more consistent and requires very little effort. The better carbonation results far out weigh the extra work as long as you have an extra bucket.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭ Bogwoppit


    Lads, if you haven't started batch priming then start now, best method by far.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16 ✭✭✭ ferg44


    I've been using the 3/4 tea spoon of sugar / bottle for 3 years, no problems.. can be bubbly if you use too much , but I hate a flat beer..
    for Cider I always add a v full spoon full to keep it carbonated ..
    I did the batch priming a few times , I keep meaning to do it again but Im just in the habit now of using the sugar ..
    use extra for cider though


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,691 Aubrielle Handsome Child


    I use DME to batch prime.


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