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Farm accident stories...be careful folks!!

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  • Zr105 wrote: »
    If you have an apple phone and have updated the software to the latest version there should be an app on the phone called health, it may be in the utilities folder if your phone automatically bunches them up

    Thanks for this. Just updated it and it is a useful app to have.




  • We run a small farm, nothing too exciting goes on around the place and I still have got a few knocks along the way. We keep every thing in order as it should be. we are not of these lads that go rushing off putting a mower on a tractor because there is 100 acres to cut and the weather is about to break, and discover that the bit that was broken last year is still not fixed, but continue on working it and get away with it for now, and then the same thing the year after and the year after that... its easy to fix machinery in off season times and have it ready for the season ahead.

    I was talking to a H+S inspector lately and he recons that an NCT type test will be brought in for the checking of tractors and their working parts (brakes, hand brakes, PTO, hydraulics, lights, ROPS and all functions of switches and levers) in the near future. this might stop alot of mechanical accidents, maybe not human error which accounts for alot of injuries.
    He also said that the DPP is pushing to get people convicted if there is a fatality on a farm (a father could be jailed if his child is killed on the farm). After all it is a place of work and at the minute after a fatality an investigation is done and sent to the DPP but that's as far as it goes, no prosecution arises from it.

    makes you think.....




  • Czhornet wrote: »

    I was talking to a H+S inspector lately and he recons that an NCT type test will be brought in for the checking of tractors and their working parts (brakes, hand brakes, PTO, hydraulics, lights, ROPS and all functions of switches and levers) in the near future. this might stop alot of mechanical accidents, maybe not human error which accounts for alot of injuries.
    He also said that the DPP is pushing to get people convicted if there is a fatality on a farm (a father could be jailed if his child is killed on the farm). After all it is a place of work and at the minute after a fatality an investigation is done and sent to the DPP but that's as far as it goes, no prosecution arises from it.

    makes you think.....

    FTMTA started talking about this a while back but I heard no more about it. Something along the lines of they took a survey of tractors and brakes were one area that was woeful. All it needs is the backing from insurance companies for machinery without the right "NCT" to refuse payouts etc.




  • Loads of farms with tractors not insured at all. Especially when they are only worth 1500 and never see the road.And I can think of nothing more pointless than jailing someone who has just been bereaved.




  • Nekarsulm wrote: »
    Loads of farms with tractors not insured at all. Especially when they are only worth 1500 and never see the road.And I can think of nothing more pointless than jailing someone who has just been bereaved.

    Agreed. All that would do is turn people against the HSA


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  • Nekarsulm wrote: »
    Loads of farms with tractors not insured at all. Especially when they are only worth 1500 and never see the road.And I can think of nothing more pointless than jailing someone who has just been bereaved.

    I could see it being very hard to convict anyone in a farming accident.




  • Bullocks wrote: »
    I could see it being very hard to convict anyone in a farming accident.

    There is a duty of care on the farmer/landowner to take reasonable actions to reduce the possibility of an accident. if a person on a public road had bad brakes in their car and killed someone then the guards would have them up for manslaughter.
    Farmers are getting away with that for the minute.

    An auld timer beside me says "accidents don't happen, they are caused"




  • Nekarsulm wrote: »
    ...And I can think of nothing more pointless than jailing someone who has just been bereaved.
    Bullocks wrote: »
    I could see it being very hard to convict anyone in a farming accident.

    Conviction and jailing are two different elements - Farmer could be convicted - same as anyone running a business - but sentence may be non-custodial/suspended if a close relative/family member involved.




  • Zr105 wrote: »
    There's a whole pile of confusion over this because when all the stuff started about clamping down on be licenses one of the papers went and made a balls up job of reporting the weights etc and every one took it as gospel rather than actually looking up the facts and figures properly, which have been pretty much unchanged for a long time now.. Which is you can tow up to what the jeep is rated to pull once you have the eb licence and the trailer weight does not exceed 3.5ton

    There's also a lot of confusion around tri axle trailers, a lot think you have to have an artic license for them but there doesn't seem to be anything in law to this regard atm.

    BUT the thing is that you'd want to be filling a tri axle with feathers and helium to be under the weight classifications for jeeps. In reality if you filled a tri axle cattle trailer you will pretty much be over loading the axles, drawbar, hitch unit, nose weight on the ball hitch on the jeep, never mind the towing capacity.

    The general rule of thumb is once ya can get them tipped up into it and the back gates wedged closed by putting a shoulder to it...'your sound .'


    Disclaimer: the preceding statement could be a load of cock and bull!!




  • Nekarsulm wrote: »
    Loads of farms with tractors not insured at all. Especially when they are only worth 1500 and never see the road.And I can think of nothing more pointless than jailing someone who has just been bereaved.
    I'd agree. The death of a child is more than anyone should have to cope with, nevermind that you may have caused it. Closing the gate after the horse has bolted would be the only analogy.
    What would be better is random saftey check-in's by some farm safety inspectors. And after a year or two introductory and informationary period, then convictions. And if a child is found on a farm in a potentially dangerous situation, then a hefty fine is imposed. Therefore a potential life saved rather than a second life ruined. Nothing makes people comply like the pocket being hit.
    These days there's no real excuse for a 2 year old wandering around a busy farm yard. It can't be justified, no matter how much craic you were when you were younger...


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  • Muckit wrote: »
    The general rule of thumb is once ya can get them tipped up into it and the back gates wedged closed by putting a shoulder to it...'your sound .'


    Disclaimer: the preceding statement could be a load of cock and bull!!

    Yep that does pretty much sum it up alright.....


    The HSA are out doing farm visits this weather, their not calling them inspections, just visits or something. They are supposed to be being fairly good about them, using the carrot method rather than the stick, but still giving you a time frame to sort anything that needs doing out. Much better way about doing it than landing in the yard threatening this and that because something is wrong.

    Never any harm if you've some one or a discussion group around the yard to ask them if there's anything they see that they think you could change or improve for your safety. A fresh set of eyes may spot something you'd never see in million years because it's just how it is to you




  • Is there stories about tacographs going into tractors in the future ? Or was it all just talk ?




  • Don't know about tacographs but I do know that, in the UK at least, there was talk of some legislation about limiting the number of hours per day a fella could spend in a tractor because of vibrations. How on earth such a thing would be enforced is beyond me.




  • davidk1394 wrote: »
    Is there stories about tacographs going into tractors in the future ? Or was it all just talk ?

    I'd say it was brought up get to lads using fast tracks for construction/haulage not agri use. Not as much of a problem in the last few years construction decline.




  • Suckler wrote: »
    I'd say it was brought up get to lads using fast tracks for construction/haulage not agri use. Not as much of a problem in the last few years construction decline.

    I'd say the running on white diesel will be the thing that will come to the forefront




  • Don't know about tacographs but I do know that, in the UK at least, there was talk of some legislation about limiting the number of hours per day a fella could spend in a tractor because of vibrations. How on earth such a thing would be enforced is beyond me.
    I'd say it'll only apply to contractors if it does come.




  • http://www.fwi.co.uk/machinery/hse-vibration-rules-finally-come-into-force-in-july.htm

    I've never heard of anyone being injured from vibrations from a tractor. Now I'm sure plenty of older tractors are real bone shakers but the vast majority of any way modern tractors are very comfortable.

    It's pretty pointless anyway as it simply cannot be enforced unless they have a team of tractor police creeping around behind ditches with stopwatches only to jump out and do you. Maybe they'll disguise themselves as scarecrows.




  • I used to hear lads saying to me my back is aching because I was driving all day.... they wouldn't do it a second day. common sense would surely kick in.




  • I know plenty of machinery operators crippled with arthritis, because the discs in their backs have been rattled to dust over the years. That being said, that's the kind of thing that should be self enforced, rather than the 'elf n' safety' brigade trying to do it for you.




  • Jumping down from tractors and loaders, instead of climbing down the steps, is what buggers up your back and knees.
    Ask any truck driver who has lots of "drops" daily.


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  • Nekarsulm wrote: »
    Jumping down from tractors and loaders, instead of climbing down the steps, is what buggers up your back and knees.
    Ask any truck driver who has lots of "drops" daily.
    Sprained an ankle more times by doing that




  • I suppose as said, this would be more of a contractor's problem. Most actual farmers, livestock & dairy at least, would not be in the tractor all day every day. Might be the case with some arable operations though. But even in the case of large arable set ups, the machines are usually modern and well designed with comfort and ergonomics in mind.




  • A big difference between the old tractors where the seat was connected directly to the engine casing and the newer tractors with proper vibration insulation, dampers etc.




  • ^^
    Yep, that is true but the thing is these days on most farms such a tractor would only be a yard tractor that gets intermittent use doing small bits and bobs around the place.
    You're not going to be sitting in some yoke with a rickety Duncan cab doing 12 or 14 hour days 6 days a week.




  • Fair play to Dun an Gall for this and the GAA for recognising it.




  • I've put in a request for a dedicated Health & Safety forum in "forum requests" if you think it's a good idea...please lend it your support. Thanks




  • Article in the journal this week about the number of deaths on farms in Ireland this year so far. Tragic stuff and very scary how easy it can happen. Very sad to also read how graphic the descriptions were and how some people were days before being discovered.






  • Interesting video from West Cork.




  • einn32 wrote: »


    Interesting video from West Cork.

    Fair man to speak. Providing a great service there


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  • The year is only 2 days old and there's already been a farm death.
    :(


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