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Possible amusing mixups with US/UK English

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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,049 ✭✭✭superfly


    its a bit annoying when i rip loads off the web for assignments and i have to do a search and replace for words with z in it ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,712 ✭✭✭Praetorian


    You can run a spell check on your assignment. Just make sure your word processor is on British English. The default is usually American English.

    Dictionary.com has definitions for almost every English word, including profanity. This isn't really the place for profanity however.


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,404 ✭✭✭✭Victor


    How about "faucet" for "tap"? And Liquor for all types of strong alcohol (non-beers). Drug stores and pharmacies are completely different things.
    Originally posted by pickarooney
    "Smoking a fag" may get you funny looks. Or appreciative ones from the gun-toting homphobic elements of society.
    The real problem comes when you say you want to "light a fag".
    Originally posted by mirv
    and what about the utter stupidity of their 'aluminum', despite them spelling it the same way as us - 'aluminium'!
    The international convention for naming elements is to use Latin, it being the "original" international language. When an American discovered Aluminium he named it "Aluminum" in breech of the convention. When adding it too the table of elements, the spelling was corrected.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,712 ✭✭✭Praetorian


    The Americans just like being different. I think its hilarious when an American says they speak "American".


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,472 ✭✭✭echomadman


    Slightly off topic, but does anyone remember the episode of Cheers where Sam was explaining to Woody that they had won the war of independence, Woody retorted with the classic
    "then why are we speaking English?"


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  • Registered Users Posts: 78,404 ✭✭✭✭Victor


    Originally posted by echomadman
    Slightly off topic, but does anyone remember the episode of Cheers where Sam was explaining to Woody that they had won the war of independence, Woody retorted with the classic
    "then why are we speaking English?"
    It's a bit like saying since Ireland has never gone to war, it has never lost a war, until some FFer says "but we lost the Civil War."


  • Registered Users Posts: 646 ✭✭✭John2002


    They also call the bonnet and boot of a car, the hood and the trunk.

    I remember a couple of Yanks laughing at us Paddy's for calling a vacuum cleaner a "Hoover". They were right.


  • Subscribers Posts: 9,716 ✭✭✭CuLT


    Originally posted by Praetorian
    The Americans just like being different. I think its hilarious when an American says they speak "American".

    Don't confuse wanting to be different with plain ol' stupidity :) .


  • Subscribers Posts: 9,716 ✭✭✭CuLT


    Oh and where does the difference between "Judaism" and "Jewish" come in?

    For instance, I am "Catholic" and believe in "Catholicism". The derivation is from the main word where as in Judaism it is completely differnet (apart from the "J").


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,317 ✭✭✭✭seamus


    Originally posted by Praetorian
    I think Centre should be spelled Center. I guess its just the way one says it! Cen ter (sen tear) not (sen tree). ;)

    Curiously, a few people I know (including myself) would use two different spellings for 'centre'. I'd spell it 'center' if I was referring to the center of a circle, or a line, etc. I'd spell it 'centre' if I was referring to a shoppng centre or community centre etc.

    For me, this is a side-effect of programming (everything is spelled in American English), but even a few non-nerd mates of mine do the same. IIRC, I was also taught in leaving cert maths that 'center' meant the middle of something. :)

    'Soda' (soft drinks in America) always reminds me of those massive things that you had to keep replacing the co2 canister in, and which were useful about twice. I wonder what happended to the company that made Sodastream after their fad went down the tubes.

    'Semi'. IT'S PRONOUNCED 'SEM - EE'!! :D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 848 ✭✭✭mirv


    I think the word 'Jewish' is less accurate, but Judaism makes sense and they follow Juda, so it could be a correction?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,137 ✭✭✭oneweb


    Originally posted by seamus
    I wonder what happended to the company that made Sodastream after their fad went down the tubes.

    I found out to my horror that they still exist when my brother came home with a brand new one last year. He's used it four times I think. (any offers?)

    Back on topic, and I'd have to say...

    I think 'cola' is a good one, should be used more here. Like if I ask for a Coke, I don't appreciate getting a Pepsi

    auto/automobile and sidewalk. The effort.

    I got a nasty look from the young wan behind the counter in a McDonalds in Dublin a good while ago. I only asked for a cheeseburger and small chips.

    So they're fries, I knew that!

    <edit> The word I couldn't think of earlier: jerk (as in to move suddenly). Different uptake altogether across the pond...

    It is what it's.



  • Registered Users Posts: 848 ✭✭✭mirv


    Originally posted by oneweb
    I found out to my horror that they still exist when my brother came home with a brand new one last year. He's used it four times I think. (any offers?)

    Back on topic, and I'd have to say...

    I think 'cola' is a good one, should be used more here. Like if I ask for a Coke, I don't appreciate getting a Pepsi :mad:

    auto/automobile and sidewalk. The effort.

    I got a nasty look from the young wan behind the counter in a McDonalds in Dublin a good while ago. I only asked for a cheeseburger and small chips.

    So they're fries, I knew that!

    I credit this mispost to the fact that someone on the PI board is growing a reversely polarised mullet. Reality is breaking down as we type!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,137 ✭✭✭oneweb


    Originally posted by mirv
    I credit this mispost to the fact that someone on the PI board is growing a reversely polarised mullet. Reality is breaking down as we type!

    OK, so I veered off on several tangents, sorry for same. I did include my 2cents on the subject tho :)

    It is what it's.



  • Registered Users Posts: 895 ✭✭✭imp


    Originally posted by CuLT
    Oh and where does the difference between "Judaism" and "Jewish" come in?

    For instance, I am "Catholic" and believe in "Catholicism". The derivation is from the main word where as in Judaism it is completely differnet (apart from the "J").

    And don't even get me started on how the hell the name "Muslim" came from "Islam"...

    }:>


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators Posts: 35,462 Mod ✭✭✭✭pickarooney


    Originally posted by CuLT
    Oh and where does the difference between "Judaism" and "Jewish" come in?

    Not that it's anythign to do with US/UK English, but the morphology comes from the lengthy schlep across Europe. In old Greek, Iudaeos meant 'Jew', and when incorporated into Latin became Iudae, and Iudaismus meant the religion of the Jews. Further transformations took place through old French and German - Giu/Juif/Judaisme and Jude/Judentum.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,712 ✭✭✭Praetorian


    On a Califormia freeway: Fine for Littering

    On a construction office in England: We Specialize in Quick erections


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 681 ✭✭✭Kopf


    Originally posted by Praetorian
    Please keep it clean and constructive. Sexual connotations are not appropriate.

    A jumper here is what the Americans call a sweater. A jumper over there is a little girls dress.

    Chips here are what the Americans call fries. Chips over there are crisps.

    The title of the thread is "Possible amusing mixups with US/UK English", not "Incredibly boring and well-known differences between US/UK English".

    What exactly did you expect?

    Christ. Bring on the secual connotations. Why they wouldn't be appropriate is far beyond me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,712 ✭✭✭Praetorian


    The title of the thread is "Possible amusing mixups with US/UK English", not "Incredibly boring and well-known differences between US/UK English".

    Most people know the differences and similarities between vulgar British English and vulgar American English. Say thank you to TV.

    So did you really know a jumper was a girls dress in America? Fair play to you. I had to look it up.
    What exactly did you expect?

    I expect people to contribute. You have not.
    Christ. Bring on the secual connotations. Why they wouldn't be appropriate is far beyond me.

    I haven't deleted anything from this thread....yet. Be careful what you post.


  • Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭josh40


    In certain states a lollipop is called a sucker!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 35,524 ✭✭✭✭Gordon


    lol, makes the phrase "I'm gonna git you suckah!" seem less emphatic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭josh40


    How about suspenders meaning braces!


  • Registered Users Posts: 35,524 ✭✭✭✭Gordon


    And retainer also means braces.


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