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RTE radio1 LW

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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,070 ✭✭✭Declan A Walsh


    From previous posts in this thread and others, I gather it started playing a loop from 12:04am on Sunday with O'Donnell Abu followed by a message explaining the different ways to pick up RTE Radio 1.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,098 ✭✭✭Glaceon


    I was listening to it live when it closed, that's how it played out alright. A user on Digital Spy uploaded the last 80-odd minutes of it.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/50pmskdz8izw9zz/RTE%20252%20LW%2014-04-23%20Final%20Programme%20From%2010.45pm.mp3?dl=0



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,011 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    Algeria coming in to Dundalk at 12:30, noisy but acceptable for speech. Same on the SDR's in Ireland that I tried.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,313 ✭✭✭Antenna


    Exact time it went off unknown so far, (maybe someone somewhere had a recording left on?) but probably very unlikely that anything of interest happened before the plug was pulled (such as an Atlantic 252 jingle being sneaked on the air!)

    Perhaps they should have left it until 2:52 this afternoon before powerdown! (At least one of the main Absolute 1215kHz transmitters (when on announcement loop) was finally shut off at... 12:15 during the day)





  • It’s not a question of “when mobile data is too cheap to be metered” we are already there unless you’re on some weird old Vodafone plan.

    If you take Eir for example, it’s about 20 quid for *unlimited data, less on Gomo. They basically reserve the right to cap at 160GB per month, but only if your usage is deemed to be undermining their network performance. So in reality, unless you’re using it as your home broadband or as a commercial server, they’re very unlikely to do anything at all.

    A lot of the networks have abandoned been fair usage policies on fixed broadband, unless you’re running a small data centre off it or something that’s actually causing issues, they really don’t give a damn anymore. It’s more expensive to generate the bills than just sell it at a flat monthly fee.

    That’s not where we are headed. It’s where we are already.

    The environmental and energy costs are another issue, but a lot of the models I’ve seen online are hopelessly out of date. Data is getting cheaper and cheaper to store, stream and transmit and the energy use is falling almost on the same kind of scale as as Moore’s Law for processor speed gains.

    I mean when you consider that the streamers don’t even feel the need to use complex multi casing, I think that says a lot about just how much the tech is changing.

    If you take Eir’s setup it’s actually now full of “merchant silicon” and custom stuff to utterly maximise the hell out of cheap and fast chips in ways that would have been unimaginable a decade ago and Eir is relatively boring!

    The speed of change in internet tech is just so rapid that it’s just turning business models on their heads year after year.

    I think we’re very rapidly going to arrive at the point where ultra fast broadband is as ubiquitous as electricity and the remaining non-IP systems will just fade, including DVB and DAB.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,070 ✭✭✭Declan A Walsh


    I understand that Misirlou by Dick Dale (the theme song for Pulp Fiction) was the last song played on RTE Radio 1 before the loop message kicked in on Long Wave at 12:04am on Sunday.





  • It’s a pity they didn’t play Tiko’s Tune or something a bit iconically associated with RTE Radio



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,070 ✭✭✭Declan A Walsh


    I am pretty sure it just happened to be the song that was on at the time and was nothing to do with the closing down of the Long Wave service.

    Post edited by Boards.ie: Mike on


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 ANOther2


    09.59.10 UTC 18 April, according to mediumwave.info: 1 blast of historic ODA and cut, sparing us the saorviewsaorsatFMvirginmedia and 2083434...



  • Registered Users Posts: 606 ✭✭✭TAFKAlawhec


    From a Republic of Ireland perspective, data is very indeed cheap compared to a lot of other European countries (only Finland really compares off the top of my head) - but not quite near the "too cheap to measure" level yet IMO even allowing for many mobile subscribers being on "unlimited" plans. There's also still plenty of data bottlenecks occurring (there's one such example just very recently mentioned on the DAB thread in the Cable & Digital/Terrestrial section), rarely an issue these days for landline based internet connections to premises, but still enough to be an issue at peak times in places (mainly urban, but could be rural) for mobile networks. That needs capacity increases which are ongoing from all three MNOs.

    Also in terms of streaming, given the predominance of FM radio listening in Ireland transferring all of that on to an IP based delivery is something I'm not sure several interests could suddenly handle very well at present. For its faults, broadcast has largely fixed costs but every stream costs a station money and this is even more wasteful to stations if the listener is in a place where they are of no interest to their advertisers. I remember 20 and even 25 years ago being told that streaming was the future of radio. And honestly, it still is, it's just a lot easier to do now than it was then. At some point, broadcast radio as we know it will end but I reckon that is some time away, at least 10 years IMO. The death of many things have been predicted in those past 25 years to be superseded by hardware & software but a lot of what could be deemed obsolete or at least deprecated are still standing.

    As for issues concerning energy costs and processing power - again Moore's Law is a factor but there will come an unknown point where this theorem will start to plateau - we just don't know when yet. When it does start to occur we'll likely have to start changing tact in a similar way that the likes of OFDM modulation are now very close to hitting the limits of the Shannon theorem, and that to get faster data speeds we're now having to develop technologies that use larger bandwidths (or combined segments of such) in combination with potentially developing more advanced path robustness for a given modulation level, as its getting very tricky now to squeeze any more "bits per Hertz" with what we already have unless Shannon's theorem can be blown out of the water.

    Post edited by Boards.ie: Mike on


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  • A lot of things are dying off faster or completely differently to what had been predicted.

    Cable TV being a prime example. I don't really think Sky and the cable companies saw that coming quite as fast as it's happening. They saw the streamers arriving, but I don't think they realised quite how fast and deep and quickly it would go. Netflix had been niche for years, but all of a sudden the studios are cutting out the middleman entirely and going straight to their end users with stuff like Paramount+, Disney+ etc.

    The other one is the POTS / PSTN switch to VoIP didn't happen the way the vendors predicted and planned. There was an expectation that it would all move over to VoIP based landline equipment in street cabinets, but that whole technology has been pretty much entirely skipped. The likes of Eir and BT sweated old assets while POTS was becoming increasingly irrelevant to consumers. They've shrunk their networks, are rapidly replacing them with VoIP at exchange level, and where fixed voice is wanted can be provided over broadband, handled by an ISP, with very little equipment needed at all and businesses are either using SIP trunks or just hosted PBXes. Everyone else is on mobiles and proprietary VoIP services like WhatsApp, Telegram, Facebook Messenger and FaceTime etc. So basically the PSTN is rapidly on its way to being not only VoIP but a niche and largely historical concept entirely.

    There are plenty of other examples of this kind of thing and I think radio is just going to through similar. There are steps like DAB / DAB+ in some countries that are intermediate technologies. It's quite possible Ireland will simply skip them.

    The way I see it is not that we'll all be listening to streaming radio, but that a mixture of podcasts and streaming music will replace what we now know as radio. It's going from linear to non linear. A collection of historic stations will obviously survive, including the likes of RTE Radio 1 but there are loads of others that I think are already dead tech talking.

    I know we all love music stations in this forum, and see the reason for them. But, I think those will die off. How exactly is a station working on an A,B,C,D cycle playlist system going to realistically compete with music streaming? It's all that most of the ILRs and even Today FM etc are. Do we really need all the DJ chatter? What does it add for the average end user ?They can mix up podcasts and streams of music.

    My view of it is that it's not just analogue radio that's about to disappear and change, it's radio stations as general concept that will just fizzle out, with a few exceptions.



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    The elderly Irish in the UK have had to adjust to stuff that elderly living at home haven't, one silly example is that the option of collecting oap in cash at the post office was done away with by the tories. There'd be all out war if that was tied in Ireland I'd imagine



  • Registered Users Posts: 606 ✭✭✭TAFKAlawhec


    I know we all love music stations in this forum, and see the reason for them. But, I think those will die off. How exactly is a station working on an A,B,C,D cycle playlist system going to realistically compete with music streaming? It's all that most of the ILRs and even Today FM etc are. Do we really need all the DJ chatter? What does it add for the average end user ?They can mix up podcasts and streams of music.

    Impossible to "part quote" a post here now it seems, but I just want to respond to this bit RetreoEncabulator - IMO there is definitely a sustaining audience for DJ led personality radio that can be given "live". Though not directly comparable, some people will travel to nightclubs (sometimes a good distance away) simply to hear a certain DJ play their set & interact with their audience (if the latter is part of the show). The same goes for a good radio DJ - they're not all the same. Many are rather banal but others have a good enough on-air personality whose USP is on live interaction, in addition to something else like their knowledge of the music they play. Podcasts & streaming have their place, but neither can yet completely replace the "live" DJ radio experience - top DJs still maintain their value to an audience that a station will want to attract - the closest to it ATM in my experience are some of the music led podcast shows on BBC Sounds - I'm not terribly fond of Fearne Cotton as a DJ, but her weekly "Sounds of the 90's" podcast shows with music & occasional guests is usually decent, but then again I grew up in 90's!

    What is definitely happening however is an increasing amount of music stations outside of Ireland going towards full time (or most of the time) automation. You could definitely argue that streaming services beat them, yet many such stations still post healthy audience figures - or at least enough to break even without having to pay someone to sit in a studio and cue up song tracks in order a lot of the time. Gold in the UK is one example, live presenter led breakfast shows, but the rest on automation.



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Roberts haven't helped the longwave cause as far some reason they have dropped longwave from an number of their sets that used to have it, e.g this one https://www.amazon.co.uk/Roberts-Radio-Sports-925-Personal



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,011 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    We are in an unprecedented age, where people can listen to exactly whatever music they want 24 hours a day. Or get speech podcasts and audio books on demand. This choice is not ever going to be replicated by radio stations, even if there were thousands of them. With non stop music, or with enthusiastic amateur disc jockeys, or phone ins. Even something as simple as broadcasting a football game, evokes the need in some to have the commentators replaced with someone less annoying or less female.

    When people get a bit older they will mostly settle for the tried and tested oldies format, a la BBC Radio 2.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,098 ✭✭✭Glaceon


    That's how it is with me. I could easily just put on my personal music collection or a Spotify playlist but I like the bit of chat on some radio shows. Especially in the morning once it's not too ridiculous.





  • My prediction isn't that we'll see the total loss of all live radio, but rather it's going to thin out, and quite dramatically.

    The main point I would make is just because something is doesn't mean it will always be. There's an absolutely massive change in technology that is at least as fundamental as early radio broadcasting was revolutionary.

    It's going to take maybe another decade or so before we 'bed in' to whatever is coming, but it's certainly not going to be what we've all grown up with.

    I think the likes or RTE Radio 1, BBC Radio 4 etc will be around for a very long time in some shape or form, but things are definitely changing and I just think failure to adapt to that could be very risky for Irish radio if it gets it wrong.



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    I do wonder how long more so many Top40 "Hit music" stations can stay around.

    Post edited by Boards.ie: Mike on


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,430 ✭✭✭Tork


    The bottom line is that picking up Radio 1 on a radio in the UK was a "nice to have" rather than a "must have". I'd also wonder how "comforting" tuning into Ryan Tubridy or Ray D'Arcy is for anyone. Local radio seems to appeal more to an older generation and ironically, those stations have only become accessible to people since the internet came along. Ronan Collins's music show was geared towards an older audience and he moved on to RTE Gold, again only accessible by modern means. There's a lot to be gained by embracing change.



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    The petition to "postpone the Longwave shutdown" past the 500 signatures mark today as an uk based Irish NGO has promoted it but I'm not sure if the people signin it are aware that it already closed 5 days ago 🤷🏻‍♂️



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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    I wonder did RTE longwave have any fans over on the Isle of Man? I guess this is the first time that RTE Radio hasn't been available on traditional radios all over the Iom (excluding downtime for maintenance) I know that Atlantic 252 was very popular on the Isle of Man right until the end and it's closure was what prompted them to licence a local Youth station energy fm



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,011 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    If you search YouTube for Isle of Man Bandscan, there are videos of FM reception on a car radio. A quick look shows that RTE and more from Ireland, stations from the North, and GB transmitters are coming in strong at some locations. But not Douglas for Ireland, it is on the wrong side of the mountains. When I was in Carrickfergus, I could get the Manx FM stations in the car.

    They always had the satellite TV option, for far more than just Radio 1.

    Post edited by dxhound2005 on


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,098 ✭✭✭Glaceon


    I wonder if you could get Saorsat there?



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,862 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    This is the sort of person who forwards on messages about lost dogs who disappeared 3 years ago in Canada 🤣

    The Dublin Airport cap is damaging the economy of Ireland as a whole, and must be scrapped forthwith.



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