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Why are Dublin people from working class areas so confident?

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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,412 ✭✭✭✭kowloon




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,883 ✭✭✭Dickie10


    i think i can understand where the person is coming from i think most urban working class act with certain bravado even urban small town working class. its the lack of conservatism perhaps as much as over confidence. more middle class people tend not to shout over or interupt people and i think like to weigh up people for a while before the let others know too much about them. conservative rural people are more likely to scope people out a lot more and find out who they are in company with and from what background before committing themselves. this probably is seen as shyness but really cute hoorism. middle class urban people are conservative and act the same way to make sure they are not rubbing up with working class or underclass people.

    very strange sociological thing that i always find bears true. a rural middle class person even from a farming background will always find themselves being more comfortable in the company of someone from D4 or SOCODU, than a working class person from thier own rural town.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,883 ✭✭✭Dickie10


    race meetings will prove this



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,387 ✭✭✭✭Sardonicat


    I think the word you are looking for is "snob". BTW, I'm from a working class background and I was always taught it was rude to interrupt or shout on conversation. Just because someone is working class doesn't mean they are ignorant, rude and uneducated and the opposite holds true.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,681 ✭✭✭Schwiiing


    Theres a proportionality in Ireland between the amount someone speaks and their accent. The worse the accent the noisier they are. Cork Limerick and rough Dublin prove it.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,821 ✭✭✭growleaves


    Southern blacks migrated to Baltimore in huge numbers in the 20th century. I should have made that clear.

    You can hear the Southern drawl in the way the black characters on The Wire speak.

    In the 1950s and before a lot of these black Southern migrants would have had unskilled jobs in the steel industry.

    "The Great Migration, the exodus of more than 6 million African Americans from the rural South to cities in the North—or in Baltimore’s case, almost North—Midwest, and West between 1910 and 1970, was one of the largest internal movements of people in U.S. history."




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,002 ✭✭✭Dufflecoat Fanny


    Capital city syndrome, delusion.



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,867 ✭✭✭✭Rothko


    Seven posts in and he was already calling it a "dumpster fire" lol.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,412 ✭✭✭✭kowloon


    I never put two and two together. The accent makes so much sense now. I done lurned a thing.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,144 ✭✭✭pgj2015




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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,151 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    I used to think the same until lived there. There are a few Dubloiin accents. As for confidence some are approaching Cork levels.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,144 ✭✭✭pgj2015


    No not aggressive, just very assured of themselves, and outgoing, maybe a little loud but in a harmless way.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,151 ✭✭✭saabsaab




  • Registered Users Posts: 16,841 ✭✭✭✭Leg End Reject


    A casual observation that I can't back up, but I've noticed that people who grow up in densely populated areas tend to be more outgoing and confident. Maybe it's because you need to be to be heard?

    Nothing to do with class, and I enjoy the Dublin wit. I'm not a Dub btw.

    Post edited by Leg End Reject on


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,286 ✭✭✭✭Loafing Oaf


    Possibly at a tangent to OP's point but as good few people from pretty hardcore Dublin areas like Brendan Grace or Joe Duffy make it big in a way you seldom see with people from under-privileged backgrounds in the rest of the country. This 'innate cockiness' may play a part in this but I guess there are more significant reasons.



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    A strong Togher or Knocka accent sound the same to me - just Cark accents. And I'm from Cork. I can't understand how someone wouldn't be able to distinguish between a strong e.g. Finglas accent and a Dalkey one. Get out of it!



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,643 ✭✭✭John_Rambo


    Joe Duffy claims his accent was a big deterrent and held him back for a long time in RTE in comparison to other broadcasters & presenters with rural or South County Dublin accents or acquired suitable accents. It is interesting and you fairly acknowledge that he's from a hardcore background, he's had a few tragic familial incidents. Like him or not, he's a savvy player.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,386 ✭✭✭olestoepoke


    Nonsense, Dubs most certainly do not sound the same. You may no be able to distinguish the different accents but they are there.

    1. Upper class, sometimes referred to as the D4 accent which I think can sometimes sound like it has a hint of Britishness.
    2. Working class, a moderate Dublin accent
    3. Inner city and some in the working class areas have a thick Dublin accent sometimes referred to as "common"
    4. North County Dublin accent and you could probably throw in other rural parts of Dublin, you can hear a hint of co Meath or neighbouring counties in some of the life long residents accent.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,643 ✭✭✭John_Rambo


    Anyone that can't distinguish a South County Dublin accent from an inner city accent can't call themselves an Irish person. Inner city Dubs have were calling Shane Ross Winston Churchtown years before mainstream media picked up on it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,938 ✭✭✭✭anewme



    People are talking about extremes.

    Not everyone is either Ross O Carroll Kelly or Allright Bud, any change?

    Most are somewhere in between.

    Im a working class Dub and while you'd know I was a Dub, I dont have a strong accent.

    Most areas in Dublin have a cross section of areas and accents. There is no such thing as a Finglas accent for example.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,286 ✭✭✭✭Loafing Oaf


    And yet he made it to the top of the media tree in a way I don't think a working class person from outside Dublin has ever done. Are there opportunities for able and ambitious kids from even the most deprived areas of Dublin that aren't available in the rest of the country?



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,643 ✭✭✭John_Rambo


    Most media is based in Dublin, so it garners more interest in the capital.

    Most agriculture is based outside the city centre and some of the most successful farmers have had opportunities in that field that aren't available to even the most affluent areas of Dublin. Not forgetting the likes of Mícheál Ó Muicheartaigh, Pat Spillane, Ray D'arcy and plenty of other ambitious non Dublin broadcasters of course.



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,286 ✭✭✭✭Loafing Oaf


    Not just media though. The arts, politics, any arena where somebody can make a 'big name' you'll find a scattering of working-class Dubs but hardy anybody from any sort of under-privileged background anywhere else. Even somebody like Paul Reid, has anybody from a working class non-Dublin background ever risen so high?



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,643 ✭✭✭John_Rambo


    Dublin is the cultural epicentre of the country. It's hardly surprising that ambitious, hard working native Dubliners, even working class ones get involved in politics and the arts. Also, when it comest to music, urban areas produce the goods due to the ease of collaboration & the closeness of communities, think U2, the Dubliners, The Cranberries, The Chieftens, Them, Still Little Fingers, Thinn Lizzy.... all from urban areas.

    Not sure if all rural TD's are from privileged backgrounds to be honest.



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,630 ✭✭✭Feisar


    You are ony noticing the louder more extroverted ones. It's like when I thought UK reg cars are always speeding, someone pointed out that I'm only seeing the ones that pass me out, I'm not seeing the ones that don't overtake me. There's a word for the phenomenon but it won't come to me now.

    First they came for the socialists...



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,675 ✭✭✭✭EmmetSpiceland


    “It is not blood that makes you Irish but a willingness to be part of the Irish nation” - Thomas Davis



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,630 ✭✭✭Feisar


    First they came for the socialists...



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]




  • Registered Users Posts: 11,188 ✭✭✭✭B.A._Baracus


    It's for show

    Take people who grew up in the flats. As kids playing outside their parents would shout (for everyone to hear) "Johnny, your chicken and chips dinner is ready!" So they'd go oh boy and run in and it's beans on toast. For show to other parents.

    So many have the latest Adidas tracksuits and Nike runners but would not have two pennies to rub together.

    Everything about working class is for show.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 20,958 ✭✭✭✭Ash.J.Williams


    Because their parents act like their mates



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