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Bereavement and Christmas?

  • 26-11-2021 11:08pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 6,429 ✭✭✭ sporina


    My Mum passed away a few mths ago and I don't feel v xmassy at all.. like, I'll go to Mass, have xmas dinner (no crackers) and watch movies.. etc.. but I don't feel like sending cards/presents etc.. no tree/decorations.. lots of candles.. Is that ok? whats the norm for Christmas when your grieving? PS I don't deprive others of a nice xmas.. I just don't feel v xmassy..



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,429 ✭✭✭ sporina


    its just how I feel.. lots of tea and hymns (and I am not even that religious but Mum was in the choir)



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    People will understand.

    Those who have felt the same after a bereavement will understand even more.

    Mind yourself.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,254 ✭✭✭ gipi


    Well, it is a tradition in Ireland for a bereaved family not to send Christmas cards the first year. You may find that some people don't send cards either.

    Do whatever you're comfortable with, and take care



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