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What's he cuttin?

  • 13-06-2021 10:10am
    #1
    Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,260 Mod ✭✭✭✭ looksee


    Idle question for a Sunday morning - though its very obvious farmers are not idle today! An adjacent field(s) of grass which usually has cows grazing it for one day at a time, then they get moved on, has been allowed to grow for a couple of weeks and has now been cut, two days ago.

    A machine is turning it about twice a day and it is drying out. What will the product be here?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,611 ✭✭✭ MrMusician18


    looksee wrote: »
    Idle question for a Sunday morning - though its very obvious farmers are not idle today! An adjacent field(s) of grass which usually has cows grazing it for one day at a time, then they get moved on, has been allowed to grow for a couple of weeks and has now been cut, two days ago.

    A machine is turning it about twice a day and it is drying out. What will the product be here?

    Silage or hay. That's a lot of turning for silage though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,166 ✭✭✭ emaherx


    looksee wrote: »
    Idle question for a Sunday morning - though its very obvious farmers are not idle today! An adjacent field(s) of grass which usually has cows grazing it for one day at a time, then they get moved on, has been allowed to grow for a couple of weeks and has now been cut, two days ago.

    A machine is turning it about twice a day and it is drying out. What will the product be here?

    Hay. It's just grass dried up in the sun. But a useful feed for cattle/sheep/horses etc.
    Silage or hay. That's a lot of turning for silage though.
    If it's been turned twice a day it's not silage anymore.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,260 Mod ✭✭✭✭ looksee


    Thanks, yes that's what was puzzling me in the depths of my great ignorance on farming matters. Too dry for silage but started out too green for hay, I thought. Smells gorgeous though!


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,260 Mod ✭✭✭✭ looksee


    It might only have been turned once a day, the machine(s) are out in all the fields and I have lost track a bit. Great drying today, yesterday was fine but a bit humid, previous days foggy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,166 ✭✭✭ emaherx


    looksee wrote: »
    It might only have been turned once a day, the machine(s) are out in all the fields and I have lost track a bit. Great drying today, yesterday was fine but a bit humid, previous days foggy.

    If it was turned more than once it won't be silage any more.

    Silage will be baled up green with a fairly high moisture content then wrapped.

    Haylage will be turned till it reaches a lower moisture content then baled and wrapped.

    Hay will be turned until it is completely dry then baled with no need for wrapping.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,874 ✭✭✭ Base price


    looksee wrote: »
    Thanks, yes that's what was puzzling me in the depths of my great ignorance on farming matters. Too dry for silage but started out too green for hay, I thought. Smells gorgeous though!
    As the others have said it's going for hay.

    Imagine a bitterly cold wet dreary day in the middle of Winter, opening a bale of that hay for cattle and getting the smell of lovely sweet hay. It's guaranteed to brighten your day as you release a little bit of Summer :)


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