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Grass that cows eat in the fields

  • 05-06-2021 10:25am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 744 ✭✭✭ Kewreeuss


    Apologies in advance for this silly question and I have no environmental axe to grind either.
    You know the field that the cattle are in during the day, munching away happily - is that ordinary grass or is it helped by fertiliser?
    I was poking around this site and I see that silage grass is, so I reckon hay must be too, but I didn’t see anything about fresh grass.

    I’ve remembered something else I was wondering about also:
    Does anyone think there is a difference in the taste of steak, depending on the part of the country it comes from? I never notice any difference and anyway I like streaks of fat through the meat to give it flavour!


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 17,908 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    Some of it is improved with reseeding and grown on with fertiliser, some isn’t.

    Sometimes it’s given gliding or slurry to bring it on.

    Lots of developing work on having fields of “multi species” plants where they complement each other and grow more volume without fertiliser.

    Fertiliser is desperately expensive, has probably increased ten fold when compared to beef prices over last 20 years. Farmers are really careful with its use, sometimes there’s a picture painted of farmers throwing out fertiliser for the sport, the opposite is true really.

    Taste of beef is more to do with breed, age and how it’s butchered. Supermarkets will get it packed and onto shelves as quickly as possible, when we killed our heifer last year she was hung for 21 days before butchering to let the meat rest and mature, it makes a massive difference.


  • Registered Users Posts: 744 ✭✭✭ Kewreeuss


    Ok, that's great. Thank you for the explanations.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,054 ✭✭✭✭ Danzy


    While I agree with Brian, I'd add that a multi species forage does change the flavour of the meat .


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,886 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    Danzy wrote: »
    While I agree with Brian, I'd add that a multi species forage does change the flavour of the meat .

    You are what you eat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm


    You are what you eat.

    Better steer clear of pig's head so !


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,886 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    Better steer clear of pig's head so !

    I would regardless of what it ate :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 744 ✭✭✭ Kewreeuss


    I haven’t eaten nice pork in a while. I’d love a decent chop.
    It either smells strongly or feels like eating polystyrene.
    I heard of a place in rathgar that sells organic free range pork.
    I will try it sometime soon.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Kewreeuss wrote: »
    I haven’t eaten nice pork in a while. I’d love a decent chop.
    It either smells strongly or feels like eating polystyrene.
    I heard of a place in rathgar that sells organic free range pork.
    I will try it sometime soon.

    You should try Iberico Spanish Pork some time. The pigs are fed on acorns. You'll seriously question the meat you eat after that.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 424 ✭✭ Government buildings


    The grass that cows eat in Ireland it's just forced green sward. Because of sprays, there are no buttercups daisies or other plants to give flavour.

    The cattle have such a boring diet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,533 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    Actually have cows eating nettle this year. Never seen it before.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    The grass that cows eat in Ireland it's just forced green sward. Because of sprays, there are no buttercups daisies or other plants to give flavour.

    The cattle have such a boring diet.

    Not spraying grass for weeds or docks anymore. Tight grazing with sheep in the winter is really improving grass.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,922 ✭✭✭ Birdnuts


    You should try Iberico Spanish Pork some time. The pigs are fed on acorns. You'll seriously question the meat you eat after that.

    Dined on something similar in France ten years ago - like a totally different product compared to the conventional stuff in terms of flavour etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,922 ✭✭✭ Birdnuts


    Actually have cows eating nettle this year. Never seen it before.

    Something I've noticed recently with intensive dairy herds is that when cows are moved across a road for milking, they go mad for whatever is growing in the roadside ditches. Ivy, Cow Parsley, Brambles u name it. Suggests to me their diet of chemically forced monoculture PRG is really lacking in many essential elements:(


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,992 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    Birdnuts wrote: »
    Something I've noticed recently with intensive dairy herds is that when cows are moved across a road for milking, they go mad for whatever is growing in the roadside ditches. Ivy, Cow Parsley, Brambles u name it. Suggests to me their diet of chemically forced monoculture PRG is really lacking in many essential elements:(

    Or cows being cows....


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,054 ✭✭✭✭ Danzy


    Kewreeuss wrote: »
    I haven’t eaten nice pork in a while. I’d love a decent chop.
    It either smells strongly or feels like eating polystyrene.
    I heard of a place in rathgar that sells organic free range pork.
    I will try it sometime soon.

    Chicken, Pork, have all gone downhill in the last few years.fast finishing, no complexity in diet, killed much quicker.

    Killed 2 pigs here one time, they had an acre of scrub and old grass, kitchen scraps, bit of silages, the falling apples of an orchard.


    Meat was incredible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,533 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    Birdnuts wrote: »
    Something I've noticed recently with intensive dairy herds is that when cows are moved across a road for milking, they go mad for whatever is growing in the roadside ditches. Ivy, Cow Parsley, Brambles u name it. Suggests to me their diet of chemically forced monoculture PRG is really lacking in many essential elements:(
    If you can get the brix up in grass it's as a complete plant as you'd ever need.
    Cows know what they need.
    Same as cravings in a pregnant woman.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,922 ✭✭✭ Birdnuts


    Mooooo wrote: »
    Or cows being cows....

    You see the same thing with sheep kept on lush monoculture swards - scour and worm issues are common too


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,073 ✭✭✭✭ wrangler


    Mooooo wrote: »
    Or cows being cows....

    True....
    Like us all they like something different


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 ✭✭✭ MeadowMaker


    I have some species rich upland hay meadows coming into its first full flower this year and was actually wondering what effect it would have to the taste to the sheep that will graze the crop ( or hay weather permitting).

    Has native grasses, plantain, meadow buttercup, yellow rattle, red clover, red bartsia, yarrow, self heal , birds foot trefoil and a couple more I can’t think off hand. Don’t think they will take to the knapweed though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,349 ✭✭✭ Waffletraktor


    I have some species rich upland hay meadows coming into its first full flower this year and was actually wondering what effect it would have to the taste to the sheep that will graze the crop ( or hay weather permitting).

    Has native grasses, plantain, meadow buttercup, yellow rattle, red clover, red bartsia, yarrow, self heal , birds foot trefoil and a couple more I can’t think off hand. Don’t think they will take to the knapweed though.

    Waste of time being the most pious farmer in the parish if it ends up in the same frdige truck to meat markets on the continent with the rest of commodity crap. The future for farms in rich high cost western countries is putting sparkles and glitter of what ever washing is needed to make customers pay a premium via mail order meatboxes etc.

    Well sold is better than better grown.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭ gozunda


    wrangler wrote: »
    True....
    Like us all they like something different

    Some French producers are marketing grass fed beef on the basis of regional Terroir which includes local soil, topography, and climate

    Something we should have a lead on here as a lot of beef produced globally is neither grass fed or produced outdoors.


  • Registered Users Posts: 424 ✭✭ Government buildings


    Irish farmers are always boasting about the quality of the grassland here.

    It's just the same old boring forced shyte all the time. No colours in the grass. No flavours.

    Such a dull diet for the cattle. It's probably some kind of animal cruelty.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,992 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    0/10 on trolling effort...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,533 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    Mooooo wrote: »
    0/10 on trolling effort...

    Green party vegan from Dublin. :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,886 ✭✭✭ herdquitter


    Green party vegan from Dublin. :D

    Surely there are some south facing window box gardens to be tended in Govt Buildings :confused: I hear they feed all the GP hangers on around those offices just from those ledges.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,054 ✭✭✭✭ Danzy


    Irish farmers are always boasting about the quality of the grassland here.

    It's just the same old boring forced shyte all the time. No colours in the grass. No flavours.

    Such a dull diet for the cattle. It's probably some kind of animal cruelty.

    Bit of emulsion on it and you'd see the growth in them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 744 ✭✭✭ Kewreeuss


    The grass that cows eat in Ireland it's just forced green sward. Because of sprays, there are no buttercups daisies or other plants to give flavour.

    The cattle have such a boring diet.

    Brian says the grass doesn’t get sprayed much.
    And maybe we should push the terroir thing too, if we are extending our markets into Europe.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,203 ✭✭✭ JeffKenna


    Birdnuts wrote: »
    Something I've noticed recently with intensive dairy herds is that when cows are moved across a road for milking, they go mad for whatever is growing in the roadside ditches. Ivy, Cow Parsley, Brambles u name it. Suggests to me their diet of chemically forced monoculture PRG is really lacking in many essential elements:(

    A cow is very curious by nature, walk into a field with them and stand still...they'll go mad for you exactly as you describe here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭ gozunda


    Green party vegan from Dublin. :D

    Sounds like the other one who is always banging on about beef and farmers and generally clueless tbf


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,167 ✭✭✭ emaherx


    The grass that cows eat in Ireland it's just forced green sward. Because of sprays, there are no buttercups daisies or other plants to give flavour.

    The cattle have such a boring diet.

    Buttercups can actually give cows a belly ache.

    Very few beef cattle are fed on the type of grass you describe, they are far more likely to be fed on more natural diverse grass swards. Or weedy rough grazing as some may know it as.

    It amazes me how many visitors to this forum come with the opinion that all of our grass land is either a chemical enriched monoculture or they see nothing but fields full of weeds.


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