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What spray is used to kill gorse (whins)

  • 13-05-2021 11:10pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 136 ✭✭ countyhouse


    What spray is used to kill gorse (whins) and what is the best time of years to spray? Will spray kill them permanently?


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,184 ✭✭✭ 99nsr125


    What spray is used to kill gorse (whins) and what is the best time of years to spray? Will spray kill them permanently?

    Don't, they are a legume, stop poaching/soil erosion.

    Just cut em back and keep your free nitrogen :-)


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    99nsr125 wrote: »
    Don't, they are a legume, stop poaching/soil erosion.

    Just cut em back and keep your free nitrogen :-)

    That’s all well and good, but they encroach into fields savage if not controlled. Even cutting them back, they’ll come up again and smother any grass underneath very quickly...

    I find grazon good. Best sprayed when small, it’ll still kill bigger bushes but you’ll need a lot of spray. Might be better to cut back and spray regrowth...

    You could spray them away now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 529 ✭✭✭ el_gaucho


    Roundup will work as well. It’s definitely better to get them when they’re small.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    el_gaucho wrote: »
    Roundup will work as well. It’s definitely better to get them when they’re small.

    Found roundup (well, gallup actually, but I thought they were the same?) wasnt as good...

    It looked to kill them, but they came back again the next year.

    Grazon seemed to actually kill them


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,822 ✭✭✭ lab man


    I've 5 acres of them here too that was cleared 5 yrs ago I kept them down till last year but now they are every where again is grazing 90 the only option


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  • Registered Users Posts: 862 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    lab man wrote: »
    I've 5 acres of them here too that was cleared 5 yrs ago I kept them down till last year but now they are every where again is grazing 90 the only option

    I found rolling them, if possible, and then spot spray the regrowth with round up.
    I have a steep slope with them that I ment to spray by now, just haven't gotten to them. They say to stay before the yellow flowers appear I think?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    tellmeabit wrote: »
    I found rolling them, if possible, and then spot spray the regrowth with round up.
    I have a steep slope with them that I ment to spray by now, just haven't gotten to them. They say to stay before the yellow flowers appear I think?

    I have the same as that - bad slope covered in furze... I should have sprayed it all last year, bit I didn’t and now some is strong enough...

    Sprayed some of it last year with grazon, and it did a good job.

    Am cutting some of it, and painted the stumps with Gallup - whether that’ll work I don’t know.
    But will spray any regrowth with grazon...

    Dose of a job, but tis kinda right satisfying too somehow :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 862 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    I did a good bit 2 years ago and then cut them. Hard graft. Didn't spray last year and they are well on th way back. Able to access them with the tractor and sprayer from tip of slope now, will spray them with well diluted grazon the next fine day. Have water hose so I can cover as far as I can. Length of pvc pipe for reach.. then cut and hope to work down to bottom..
    Might be a cracked idea but will try. Saw a lad in the distance doing something similar but he was able to get digger in to clear the dead furs.. wouldn't reach here. Must have 2 - 3 acres on slope. Did the stumps with round up too


    Ill get pic over wknd. Might spur me on


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    tellmeabit wrote: »
    I did a good bit 2 years ago and then cut them. Hard graft. Didn't spray last year and they are well on th way back. Able to access them with the tractor and sprayer from tip of slope now, will spray them with well diluted grazon the next fine day. Have water hose so I can cover as far as I can. Length of pvc pipe for reach.. then cut and hope to work down to bottom..
    Might be a cracked idea but will try. Saw a lad in the distance doing something similar but he was able to get digger in to clear the dead furs.. wouldn't reach here. Must have 2 - 3 acres on slope. Did the stumps with round up too


    Ill get pic over wknd. Might spur me on

    Same as myself, only I have to spray with the backpack - and to be honest, that’s how they got so bad. As tisnt a job you’d be rushing into... ;)

    Cutting them I find isn’t too bad. Tis having to gather them and pile em up is worse. If you don’t gather em, all they do is stifle the ground they’re thrown on...

    We’ll have a mighty bonfire some night though I suppose :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 780 ✭✭✭ older by the day


    I have an old topper the one rotating bar type, I know I'm asking for trouble some day, but it makes pure trash of them . Back up on them and slowly let down the lift. Dont forget the box of shear bolts. A mulsher is the proper yoke.
    https://www.seppi.com/en/video/brush-and-tree-clearing.html?slg=midiforst-dt-clearing-overgrown-field


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,911 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    I have an old topper the one rotating bar type, I know I'm asking for trouble some day, but it makes pure trash of them . Back up on them and slowly let down the lift. Dont forget the box of shear bolts. A mulsher is the proper yoke.
    https://www.seppi.com/en/video/brush-and-tree-clearing.html?slg=midiforst-dt-clearing-overgrown-field

    Careful.
    Have seen rotor shaft bent doing that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 780 ✭✭✭ older by the day


    _Brian wrote: »
    Careful.
    Have seen rotor shaft bent doing that.

    Taught it will be the gearbox that will go first. I know I'm trying to quit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,822 ✭✭✭ lab man


    Taught it will be the gearbox that will go first. I know I'm trying to quit.

    Would a mulcher break them up


  • Registered Users Posts: 862 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    Ya, I've seen a 20t digger man with a mulcher on the end clear a spot quick enough. Just though the digger could have scrape them outta the ground as easy and maybe better result. I see after I've cut them that there would be fresh growth that summer.
    When we were young we used burn the slopes at start of summer and used to graze with milking cows


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    tellmeabit wrote: »
    Ya, I've seen a 20t digger man with a mulcher on the end clear a spot quick enough. Just though the digger could have scrape them outta the ground as easy and maybe better result. I see after I've cut them that there would be fresh growth that summer.
    When we were young we used burn the slopes at start of summer and used to graze with milking cows

    Sorry I didn’t burn mine last Feb. I didn’t cos I thought burning would only bring on new growth and seeds...
    But I think that’ll happen anyways...
    And now, there is some amount of stuff...

    Plus, I think the ash from burning would give a bit of fertiliser to the ground...


  • Registered Users Posts: 862 ✭✭✭ tellmeabit


    Ya. Last time I burned a section. I had made a clear path and burned with the wind so just a small section went up. Then cut it. Think the burning made it harder to cut. But cleared a load if briars etc. That while area was all grass later that year. It's maybe 3 years later now and they are coming back. Supposed it's an every year job


  • Registered Users Posts: 152 ✭✭ Omallep2


    I have an old topper the one rotating bar type, I know I'm asking for trouble some day, but it makes pure trash of them . Back up on them and slowly let down the lift. Dont forget the box of shear bolts. A mulsher is the proper yoke.
    https://www.seppi.com/en/video/brush-and-tree-clearing.html?slg=midiforst-dt-clearing-overgrown-field

    Who would need a digger..


  • Registered Users Posts: 152 ✭✭ Omallep2


    I have an old topper the one rotating bar type, I know I'm asking for trouble some day, but it makes pure trash of them . Back up on them and slowly let down the lift. Dont forget the box of shear bolts. A mulsher is the proper yoke.
    https://www.seppi.com/en/video/brush-and-tree-clearing.html?slg=midiforst-dt-clearing-overgrown-field
    tellmeabit wrote: »
    Ya. Last time I burned a section. I had made a clear path and burned with the wind so just a small section went up. Then cut it. Think the burning made it harder to cut. But cleared a load if briars etc. That while area was all grass later that year. It's maybe 3 years later now and they are coming back. Supposed it's an every year job
    W
    We were plagued with them and I gave it a good dose of pig slurry and lime and kept the fertility high since. Never came.back only in the ditch


  • Registered Users Posts: 136 ✭✭ countyhouse


    99nsr125 wrote: »
    Don't, they are a legume, stop poaching/soil erosion.

    Just cut em back and keep your free nitrogen :-)

    They are not on the farm, they have taken over my sons site completely. They must be removed


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,335 ✭✭✭ endainoz


    Had a steep hill that was riddled with them a few years ago. Got a digger with a mulcher attached to it to clear them, place cleared up really well. The grass regrowth on it has been great and the regrowth of the gorse has been cut with a major cyclone twice in the past four years. I do still have some gorse in some corners but I just keep on top and young plants so it doesn't get out of control.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,184 ✭✭✭ 99nsr125


    They are not on the farm, they have taken over my sons site completely. They must be removed

    Thistlex then will rid them and brambles from the site


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,400 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    This is what I’m doing


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,400 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    More


  • Registered Users Posts: 780 ✭✭✭ older by the day


    More

    Hire a digger and pull them. Don't be killing yourself ffs


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,400 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    Hire a digger and pull them. Don't be killing yourself ffs

    They were pulled in 2014. The digger broke a skull of clay and millions of seeds germinated. Cutting and spraying. About 200 metres took 3 hours.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,365 ✭✭✭ crossman47


    Off topic but since when have Irish people started to call them gorse. They're either furze or whins.


  • Registered Users Posts: 405 ✭✭ Donegalforever


    crossman47 wrote: »
    Off topic but since when have Irish people started to call them gorse. They're either furze or whins.

    They are always know as Whins here.
    But, the Fire Brigades call them gorse, (which I think is incorrect).


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,015 ✭✭✭✭ Water John


    Aitheann Gaelic down here in Cork. The regrowth would be cut for horses. Have two old machines that used to chop it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    Water John wrote: »
    Aitheann Gaelic down here in Cork. The regrowth would be cut for horses. Have two old machines that used to chop it.

    Really?
    Never heard it called anything other than furze...

    And when burnt, as it was every year - the black sticks collected for the fire were called ‘spánach’ :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,018 ✭✭✭✭ cnocbui


    crossman47 wrote: »
    Off topic but since when have Irish people started to call them gorse. They're either furze or whins.

    My late mother, for one. So since the 1930's


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