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New job,Exit interview

  • 11-04-2021 1:49pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    So got myself a new job. Will be handing in my notice tomorrow. Will work out the 2 weeks if they wish. I will probably do an exit interview.

    Workers, team leads and supervisors have all been great but above that, production managers etc have been terrible. No idea of how things work in the real world day to day. Concocting totally unworkable ideas that look good on paper but are completely unrealistic.

    Have seen grown men Supervisors shouted at and berated in front of all levels of staff.

    They say don't burn your bridges but I would never go back to this company. I'll draft the usual notice thanking the company etc.

    I guess my question is when it comes to the exit interview should I just go through the motions or actually let them know what I really think ?

    My new job is sorted, references etc. so nothing to lose.
    There is one toxic individual in particular who needs behaving.
    Opinions ? Advice ?

    Thanks.


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 11,716 ✭✭✭✭ Interested Observer


    I wouldn't. There's nothing in it for you.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    I would, as every little bit helps for everyone. Maybe you and others would have been spared their behaviour if someone had done likewise.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,770 ✭✭✭ GT89


    Does it matter you're leaving either way. Might aswell say nice things in order to not burn any bridges I left a job I didn't like recently and still said good things when I was leaving. As easy to be nice as it is to bad mouth the company. You're in new job so it won't make a difference what you say.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,569 ✭✭✭ mugsymugsy


    Ireland is a small place. Unless you are moving to a different industry or are sure you will have no future connection then I wouldn't bother


  • Registered Users Posts: 704 ✭✭✭ Vestiapx


    Never burn bridges, while you might not ever return to that company your actions could cause someone who is questioned to look for work elsewhere, they might then get a job and eventually be in a position to influence your happiness. Ireland is a tiny country there is no reason to create enemies when you don't have to.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 894 ✭✭✭ Deub


    You may not work for this company again but you could see one of the production managers, etc in your next company (or maybe even the one you are moving to).


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    Or maybe if someone had stood up to a toxic bitch from day one she might not be the [email protected] she is today.

    I'm not going to personalise anything but am going to let HR know where I think the company is failing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,637 ✭✭✭ brightspark


    There is nothing to be gained by being completely honest. Don't burn your bridges.

    If you feel you have to, just suggest something along the lines that communication could be improved and leave it vague. If there is a problem then it's their problem not yours.

    But remember the real objective of an exit interview is to protect the company from "constructive dismissal" claims.


    They have other methods of improving management staff relations if they wanted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,637 ✭✭✭ brightspark


    Vestiapx wrote: »
    ... your actions could cause someone who is questioned to look for work elsewhere....


    Very good point, Careful OP they could end being your boss again!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 Black Cloud


    I suggest you tell HR not how the company is failing, as you put it, but rather cite examples/procedures that might help the company improve productivity. No one likes to hear how they're failing, especially by someone leaving.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    Vestiapx wrote: »
    Never burn bridges, while you might not ever return to that company your actions could cause someone who is questioned to look for work elsewhere, they might then get a job and eventually be in a position to influence your happiness. Ireland is a tiny country there is no reason to create enemies when you don't have to.

    So just put up with bullying, intimidation, shoddy work practices and incompetence and let whoever comes after deal with it ?

    Say nothing about a nasty, toxic environment because my old boss might be my new boss somewhere down some hypothetical road ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,569 ✭✭✭ mugsymugsy


    Heckler wrote: »
    Or maybe if someone had stood up to a toxic bitch from day one she might not be the [email protected] she is today.

    I'm not going to personalise anything but am going to let HR know where I think the company is failing.

    Op - I would be surprised if they don't know this already. Been there I did the exit interview as I was moving industry and they knew about it. I was the 4th person in that role within 18 months. The senior person was an absolute nightmare.

    I left within 3 months as luckily lined up something else and could explain why I was moving on quickly.


  • Registered Users Posts: 292 ✭✭ Bicyclette


    One option is to do the "grand" interview. Just answer "Grand" or "its grand" to every answer.

    Another option would be to sandwich a criticism between two positives. E.g. Praise your team leads, explain that you found the production managers difficult and then then mention that you would be happy to work again with e.g. Your team leads and supervisors again.

    Sometimes what you don't say can be as powerful as what you DO say.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,621 ✭✭✭✭ wonski


    Heckler wrote: »
    So just put up with bullying, intimidation, shoddy work practices and incompetence and let whoever comes after deal with it ?

    Say nothing about a nasty, toxic environment because my old boss might be my new boss somewhere down some hypothetical road ?

    And you really think your opinion on exit interview will make them swoop the place and discipline all the people you listed when you left the company?

    Bullying and intimidation are serious accusations, but to only bring it when you are leaving means nothing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,195 ✭✭✭✭ bucketybuck


    Speaking your mind in an exit interview is akin to having a fight with somebody on the internet. You might think you won something, but in reality nobody else gave a ****.

    If you really think it would make you feel better then sure, go for it, but dont delude yourself into thinking it will achieve very much.

    Against that is the very real possibility that you cross paths again with somebody involved in the future. And that does happen, no matter how confident you are that it wont.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,637 ✭✭✭ brightspark


    Heckler wrote: »
    So just put up with bullying, intimidation, shoddy work practices and incompetence and let whoever comes after deal with it ?

    Say nothing about a nasty, toxic environment because my old boss might be my new boss somewhere down some hypothetical road ?

    If you were bullied then make a formal complaint about it.

    Shoddy work practices and incompetence are the companies problem, if it's illegal then whistleblow the HR dept are there to protect the company not the workers.

    Leave a bad review on glass door if you must to stop others going there,


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,195 ✭✭✭✭ bucketybuck


    Heckler wrote: »
    So just put up with bullying, intimidation, shoddy work practices and incompetence and let whoever comes after deal with it ?

    Say nothing about a nasty, toxic environment because my old boss might be my new boss somewhere down some hypothetical road ?

    If this is so important to you then why not stay and fight for change from within?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,619 ✭✭✭ Cluedo Monopoly


    More often than not HR will ignored 100% of what's said in the exit interview. HR rarely rock the boat.
    HR are just going through motions on the exit interview.

    I wouldn't burn any bridges either, you never know when you will need a reference from your previous employer and you could well be working with these colleagues in the future.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    wonski wrote: »
    And you really think your opinion on exit interview will make them swoop the place and discipline all the people you listed when you left the company?

    Bullying and intimidation are serious accusations, but to only bring it when you are leaving means nothing.

    This company loses staff by the new time and has no compunction in firing people when they walk in the door on a monday morning.

    Of course I don't think any of my actions will make a difference in the long run but maybe if others following on make the same claims it might make them consider themselves and their policies.


  • Registered Users Posts: 372 ✭✭ spuddy4711


    Assume that anything you say may be made known to everyone.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    If this is so important to you then why not stay and fight for change from within?

    Not Erin Brockovich. Get real.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,770 ✭✭✭ KaneToad


    Thank them for giving you the opportunity to progress your career. Wish them well for the future. Smile and leave.

    Telling them what you really think will have no benefit for you and is unlikely to benefit colleagues left behind.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,637 ✭✭✭ brightspark


    Heckler wrote: »
    Not Erin Brockovich. Get real.

    Precisely...So why risk it coming back to you in the future?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    KaneToad wrote: »
    Thank them for giving you the opportunity to progress your career. Wish them well for the future. Smile and leave.

    Telling them what you really think will have no benefit for you and is unlikely to benefit colleagues left behind.

    It would have the benefit of me letting them know what a ****show of a company they run.

    So noone should ever criticise a former employer ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 894 ✭✭✭ Deub


    Heckler wrote: »
    It would have the benefit of me letting them know what a ****show of a company they run.

    So noone should ever criticise a former employer ?

    Why do you ask for opinions/advice if you believe it must be done?

    Go ahead and do it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,020 ✭✭✭ Treppen


    Just wait a few months then put it up on Glassdoor.

    HR are worth a **** in Ireland, they are brainwashed to ensure the company always comes before the welfare of the employee. That's what the exit interview is there for, it's not for you or your former colleagues.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,169 ✭✭✭ km991148


    There's a couple of reasons why you would want to.
    1. You care about the place and want it to improve
    2. You feel pissed off and want to let them know exactly what you think of them and are generally annoyed that you have to move and feel like you are on the back foot and want those feelings heard.


    If 1. Then too late at exit interview. You could maybe gently suggest that they should look to improve processes etc and do whatever for team morale. But really there is more to loose then gain for you. If you carry that much and wanted to improve, you'd still be there doing that (helping).

    If you feel a bit more like number 2. Then there is even more risk. You will get absolutely nothing in return and will feel more annoyed. Better to hand notice, draw a line and move on.

    Life's too short and it's not your mess or company to sort out. You may feel bad for your soon to be former colleagues, but they are adults as well and can either help or get out as well.

    The exit interview as others said is a formality. Box checking to protect against any future legal issues that may arise.


    So give notice, be happy, talk about the 'better opportunities' 'better salary' or whatever the new place offers but I wouldn't go into anything at the point of exit interview.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,169 ✭✭✭ km991148


    More often than not HR will ignored 100% of what's said in the exit interview. HR rarely rock the boat.
    HR are just going through motions on the exit interview.

    It's really only there as a protection mechanism in case an employee wants to sue or something down the line.

    Makes the case (for example) for constructive dismissal more difficult if the employee was afforded an opportunity to speak and never did.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,637 ✭✭✭ brightspark


    Treppen wrote: »
    Just wait a few months then put it up on Glassdoor.

    HR are worth a **** in Ireland, they are brainwashed to ensure the company always comes before the welfare of the employee. That's what the exit interview is there for, it's not for you or your former colleagues.


    HR aren't brainwashed to ensure the company comes before the employee....it's their job. (never forget that he who pays the piper calls the tune)

    They exist to get the maximum return from employees with the minimum expenditure. (including protecting against legal action etc.)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭ Heckler


    km991148 wrote: »
    There's a couple of reasons why you would want to.
    1. You care about the place and want it to improve
    2. You feel pissed off and want to let them know exactly what you think of them and are generally annoyed that you have to move and feel like you are on the back foot and want those feelings heard.


    If 1. Then too late at exit interview. You could maybe gently suggest that they should look to improve processes etc and do whatever for team morale. But really there is more to loose then gain for you. If you carry that much and wanted to improve, you'd still be there doing that (helping).

    If you feel a bit more like number 2. Then there is even more risk. You will get absolutely nothing in return and will feel more annoyed. Better to hand notice, draw a line and move on.

    Life's too short and it's not your mess or company to sort out. You may feel bad for your soon to be former colleagues, but they are adults as well and can either help or get out as well.

    The exit interview as others said is a formality. Box checking to protect against any future legal issues that may arise.


    So give notice, be happy, talk about the 'better opportunities' 'better salary' or whatever the new place offers but I wouldn't go into anything at the point of exit interview.

    Yup. Sounds about right.

    I'm happy to be moving on but just feel frustrated that people coming in behind me are just going to be putting up with same. They'll cop on, move on and the cycle just repeats.

    Thanks for all the replies. I'll put in my notice tomorrow and keep schtum.


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