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Now ye're talking - to a man living in Qatar

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  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    Hi. Roughly how much would you need to factor into your budget per day if you're staying in a mid-range hotel and eating out once a day in an inexpensive restaurant (assuming the latter exist). Also how long would you need to see all that's worth seeing in the country? Thanks.

    The hotels in Qatar are rated from 1 to 5 stars. I just used booking.com to look at 4 star hotels for random dates in June - it looks as if about Euro150 is the going rate.

    As for eating out, there is a huge variety, quality is usually good, and prices range from the ridiculous to the reasonable. All of the big familiar chains are here, and if you like Indian or Arabic for you can eat very well for 10-20 Euros.

    As for seeing all that's worth seeing in the country? Three to four days would be my guess. Qatar is about the size of Munster - but really the State and the city of Doha are the same thing. 90% of people live in Doha and there is very little to see outside of that. Although there is a long coastline, much of the shore is either stony or muddy. There are some sandy beaches but not many.

    I would however highly recommend a day trip (or even camping overnight) to the Inland Sea. Hire a driver with a big Toyota 4x4 and go dune bashing. It is great fun:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjZkuRcPv4k

    Within Doha I would recommend spending some time in Souk Waqif to buy souvenirs and eat in one of the many outdoor restaurants.

    Other worthwhile activities would be a visit to the Museum of Islamic Art and the National Museum which, in addition to the quality of the exhibits, are stunning buildings in the own rights.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    Lmkrnr wrote: »
    Did the two Boobie Girls make the News in Qatar?

    I don't think so, but the Ukrainian models on the balcony in Dubai certainly did!


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    listermint wrote: »
    I don't personally think that was a loaded question it was a pertinent question, having personally travelled through the region with my wife and seeing first hand segregation and distaste for even normal affection for your own wife in public. I don't believe throwing back at the poster Ireland from nearly 50 years ago when the first man landed on the moon is a reasonable response to his question.

    You are raising your daughter in a country where she is and will be a second class citizen. Today not when lads were hopping around in black and white footage.

    It's a fair question. And note I work today with 16 different nationalities in Ireland right now and I have been to their homes.

    Would you say money is the sole reason you are there in its entirety.

    You are of course entitled to feel that the gender segregation and prohibition on displays of public affection are disagreeable to you - but that is part of the Arabic and Muslim culture. And they are as entitled to have and express their own culture as we in the West are to have and express our culture.

    We sometimes make a big deal in the West about the need for Muslim immigrants to bend towards our culture and values. Well that is a two way street - if you choose to live among another people then you must accept that you live within the context of their culture and values.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    feargantae wrote: »
    You mention money quite a few times in your answers so can i ask how much you earn a month? Would it be safe to assume you live quite comfortably?

    You've been away from Éire for a decade but do you often come back home to visit? Current situation excluded of course! How do you stay in touch with Ireland/Irish culture? Would you watch RTÉ/TG4, keep up with Irish news, elections, current affairs etc?

    So I am an experienced and senior manager. When I left Ireland 10 years ago I was earning 100,000 Euros. I more than doubled my salary. I do live comfortably, but life here can be expensive too. You really can't buy property and renting is expensive - a 4-bed family house would cost around 4,000 Euros per month.

    I come back to Ireland at least once a year and often twice - but I'm not sure that I'll ever live there again (the weather is atrocious!).

    I read the Irish news online and follow various commentators on Twitter, but I don't watch Irish TV.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,862 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    You are of course entitled to feel that the gender segregation and prohibition on displays of public affection are disagreeable to you - but that is part of the Arabic and Muslim culture. And they are as entitled to have and express their own culture as we in the West are to have and express our culture.

    We sometimes make a big deal in the West about the need for Muslim immigrants to bend towards our culture and values. Well that is a two way street - if you choose to live among another people then you must accept that you live within the context of their culture and values.

    With all due respect I've the utmost respect for their beliefs and culture , I was responding to what was evidently untrue that this would not impact your daughter. The poster was correct it will . It impacts a swathe of choices for her.

    I have no feelings on a wholely muslim country changing it's culture to suit me. I know many muslim people it's their faith ,just like any other faith. Folks are free to practice and live their religious choices.

    I was merely pointing out an inaccuracy in your response and noting that your comparison to an ireland a generation ago was weak.


    Thanks for taking part btw . Its good discussion.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,130 ✭✭✭James Bond Junior


    I live in Oman, similar experience. A few friends came from Qatar to Oman and all have very fond memories. On the blue collar worker thing, yes they don't have it easy but it beats where most of these people come from in India or Bangladesh. They are there for the same reason as all of us, economic migration and to send money home to make a better life when they return.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    Fathom wrote: »
    Hi. Thanks for your answers to questions above.

    Would it be wise for a young single western woman to visit Qatar by herself? Or apply for employment and work and live there by herself? If she worked for a western university with a campus in Qatar, would she be paid the same as lecturers and professors in their home country, or paid more, or less? What if she worked for a Qatar university? Differences? Pay? Benefits? Clothing requirements?

    Are there places where she would need a male escort? How would Qatar nationals, men or women, think of an single western women visiting, or working and residing in their country? Do you personally know any western women traveling or residing in Qatar by themselves?

    Can she wear a western swim suit (one or 2 piece) to swim in Gulf or hotel pool or public pool? Or be allowed to swim at all? Probably a naive question?

    Thanks again.

    Hi and thanks for the question.

    There are lots of single western women (including Irish women) living and working in Qatar. My guess would be that a lot of the Irish women here are working in education. Most of them are half my age and I wouldn't know where to begin in terms of describing their experience. If you are interested there is a Facebook page where you might get more information:
    https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=qatar%20irish%20society

    There is also a GAA club here and that also seems to be a focal point for much of the socialising of younger Irish people here:
    https://qatargaa.qa/#:~:text=Since%20its%20formation%20in%202004,of%20the%20GAA%20in%20Ireland.

    In general salaries here are very good and I would strongly recommend that anyone thinking of coming here should make sure that the package is good before you arrive as it is very difficult to get improvements after you arrive. As a general rule of thumb you should be looking for a salary that is twice the gross salary that you would get in your home country. On top of that you may get a housing allowance or get free accommodation. An annual airfare home is usual, and at the end of your stay you are entitled by law to an additional months salary for each year of service.

    As for clothing requirements western men and women dress for work in the same way as they would in the west. The public beaches in are not that great in terms of quality and, because of the fact that men significantly outnumber women in Qatar I think that a western woman, while quite safe, might not feel comfortable on a public beach. Most of the hotels that are on the coast have private beaches and pools, and you can buy a day-pass. A lot of people do that and western women will wear western swimwear.

    Also most westerners live in a compound - which is effectively a small housing estate for expats. Most compounds will have facilities such as a gym and a swimming pool and again western women will wear western swimwear.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    listermint wrote: »
    With all due respect I've the utmost respect for their beliefs and culture , I was responding to what was evidently untrue that this would not impact your daughter. The poster was correct it will . It impacts a swathe of choices for her.

    I have no feelings on a wholely muslim country changing it's culture to suit me. I know many muslim people it's their faith ,just like any other faith. Folks are free to practice and live their religious choices.

    I was merely pointing out an inaccuracy in your response and noting that your comparison to an ireland a generation ago was weak.


    Thanks for taking part btw . Its good discussion.

    I think perhaps you are not appreciating that I and my family live in a world that is almost hermetically sealed from Arabic and Muslim culture - largely because that is how our hosts want it.

    My daughter went to a fantastic international school, has just aced the International Baccalaureate, and is already accepted into a prestigious European university.

    Growing up in a multicultural environment in Qatar has broadened her perspectives and has given her far more choices in life than if we had stayed in Ireland.

    I certainly came here for the money, but the real long-term benefit has been the experience and opportunities that all of our children have had.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 475 ✭✭AdrianBalboa


    I personally believe that any Westerner who moves to authoritarian theocracies such as Qatar or the UAE are complicit in the human rights atrocities committed by the local regime. In other words the price for your high salary and standard of living is being paid for by slave labour+.

    What is your immediate response to my beliefs?

    Going off topic for a moment I remember there was an AMA in here with an American policeman and the only dissenting poster was asked not to post again.

    I wasn’t a member of the site then but I remember thinking that it was incredible that the moderators who ran this forum were allowing propaganda be issued on this site in favour of a paramilitary terrorist organisation like the US police.

    I’m just pointing this out because I think the same thing is happening here today, that a poster is using Boards.ie in order to distribute pro-Qatar propaganda. After George Floyd that first poster in the police thread will be perceived to be on the right side of history and so will I when the true extent of the atrocities committed in order to build the football stadiums(!) for Qatar 2022 emerge.



    +source: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/world-cup-2022-qatar-s-workers-slaves-building-mausoleums-stadiums-modern-slavery-kafala-a7980816.html


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    I live in Oman, similar experience. A few friends came from Qatar to Oman and all have very fond memories. On the blue collar worker thing, yes they don't have it easy but it beats where most of these people come from in India or Bangladesh. They are there for the same reason as all of us, economic migration and to send money home to make a better life when they return.

    I have visited Oman, and I also have a few friends who moved from Qatar to Oman.

    One of the things that people tell me is that you are much more likely to have an opportunity to have social interactions with Omanis than with Qataris. The Omanis are not as wealthy, and you will find them running corner shops and driving taxis etc. jobs that you will never find a Qatari doing.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,725 ✭✭✭The J Stands for Jay


    ]As for clothing requirements western men and women dress for work in the same way as they would in the west.

    Could you elaborate on this a bit? I work in finance in Dublin, and the dress code is casual.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    I personally believe that any Westerner who moves to authoritarian theocracies such as Qatar or the UAE are complicit in the human rights atrocities committed by the local regime. In other words the price for your high salary and standard of living is being paid for by slave labour+.

    What is your immediate response to my beliefs?

    Going off topic for a moment I remember there was an AMA in here with an American policeman and the only dissenting poster was asked not to post again.

    I wasn’t a member of the site then but I remember thinking that it was incredible that the moderators who ran this forum were allowing propaganda be issued on this site in favour of a paramilitary terrorist organisation like the US police.

    I’m just pointing this out because I think the same thing is happening here today, that a poster is using Boards.ie in order to distribute pro-Qatar propaganda. After George Floyd that first poster in the police thread will be perceived to be on the right side of history and so will I when the true extent of the atrocities committed in order to build the football stadiums(!) for Qatar 2022 emerge.



    +source: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/world-cup-2022-qatar-s-workers-slaves-building-mausoleums-stadiums-modern-slavery-kafala-a7980816.html

    Firstly, let me say that you are entitled to whatever beliefs you think are appropriate for you. I have no response, immediate or otherwise, to your beliefs. I will however discuss workers rights. You may not like or agree with what I say - but it is not propaganda, it is fact.

    Secondly, you can certainly make the argument that any Westerner who moves to countries like Qatar or the UAE are complicit in the human rights atrocities committed by the local regime, but if you are to be fair you must also accept that anyone who buys a shirt made in the sweatshops of Bangladesh, or owns a smartphone with cobalt mined by children in DRC, or drinks lattes made from coffee harvested by wage slaves is equally complicit in those human rights atrocities. The world is enormously unfair and all of us white western posters on Boards.ie live lives that depend upon the exploitation of others.

    We tend not to see the connections between out lifestyles and the exploitation of others because that exploitation takes place far away from us. Perhaps the difference in the Middle East is that the wealthy and the poor live side by side.

    By the way my salary is not paid for by slave labour, my salary is paid from the emormous wealth of the State of Qatar, which in turn is based on the fact that they happen to share with Iran the largest natural gas field in the world.

    So, turning then to the construction that is taking place in Qatar (including the Stadia - though that is just a small part of the total). I think that it can sometimes be difficult to comprehend the scale of the construction work that is taking place in Qatar. The Qataris are currently spending half a billion dollars a week on infrastructure. There is a new airport, harbour, Metro, motorways, 5G systems, public parks, sewage systems, water desalination plants, district cooling plants and dozens of new hotels. The infrastructure is far ahead of any European city that I can think of, all done in 20 years or so.

    My work relates (at a tangent at least) to the insurance industry and so I am (to some degree) familiar with death rates, and statistics about the levels of accidents in the workplace etc.

    Some media commentators (and I think the Guardian leads the charge here) frequently refer to the thousands of migrant workers who have dies since Qatar was awarded the World Cup. For example:

    Revealed: 6,500 migrant workers have died in Qatar since World Cup awarded
    Guardian analysis indicates shocking figure over the past decade likely to be an underestimate
    www.theguardian.com

    Let's accept the number of 6,500 as a fact.

    The population of Qatar is 2.9m of which only about 300,000 are Qatari. Only the Qataris can stay in Qatar indefinitely so the other 2.5m (including me) are migrant workers. But let us assume that we're talking about "blue-collar" workers only. Approx 69.7% of the migrant workers in Qatar are "blue-collar":
    (PDF) Demography, Migration, and Labour Market in Qatar- UPDATED June 2017.

    That gives us 1.8m manual workers - mostly from South East Asia - India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

    The article mentions that Filipinos and Kenyans are not included in its death tally. Most Filipinos speak English very well and are typically employed in the retail and services sectors - with some working as home help. I have never seen a Filipino doing unskilled manual labour. Most Kenyans also speak English and seem to be usually employed (male and female) as security guards - I have never seen a Kenyan doing unskilled manual labour. The Filipinos (approx 250,000) are therefore typically not in the "blue-collar" category. There are approx 30,000 Kenyans - I'm not sure how they are classified but that number does not materially impact on things.

    So returning to the number of deaths - 6,500 over 10 years = 650 per annum. Let's also reduce the number of manual workers from 1.8m to 1.5m because numbers have probably increased over the past couple of years.

    That gives us 650 deaths per year from a population of 1.5m males (aged typically from 25 - 55) from India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

    That in turn gives us a death rate of 43 per 100,000. In the United States the death rate for men between the ages of 25 and 55 is 306.

    Another factor that should lead to a higher number for Qatari manual labourers is that most are engaged in the construction sector, which in every country has a higher accident and death rate than for all employments aggregated.

    On the other side of the scales we should remember that the American numbers count everyone in the United States of that age group whereas the Qatar migrants numbers relate only to men who were fit to work and who passed a health and blood test - for example, anyone with TB or AIDS is not allowed in.

    Nevertheless, bringing all of this together, the real story here is not why is the death rate among Qatar migrant manual workers so high, but why is it so low?

    There are a couple of factors:
    • The first reason is that all of the workers who come to Qatar (including me) must pass a health check. So anyone with a serious underlying condition or illness cannot work in Qatar, and that is definitely skewing the numbers;
    • Secondly employment, accommodation and nutrition standards for manual workers are fairly good in general, perhaps not what the average boards.ie reader might find acceptable, but the average low-skilled South Asian worker, coming from the slums of Dhaka or Lahore, is generally content.
    • Thirdly labour rights and health and safety standards are probably the best in the region - and I know that may not be saying much - but the Qataris appear to be genuinely engaged in this issue. The International Labor Organisation has a permanent office in Qatar and works closely with the Government on issues affecting workers rights. It has to be said that it is a work in progress, but it is moving. ILO Project Office for the State of Qatar (Arab States)
    • And finally there is world-class healthcare system in Qatar, it is available to every resident, and it is free. I am fully vaccinated against Covid. My teenage kids got their first shots last week, and they queued up at a public vaccination station along with workers from every nationality.

    I will make a separate post about the wages paid to manual workers.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    McGaggs wrote: »
    Could you elaborate on this a bit? I work in finance in Dublin, and the dress code is casual.

    It does tend to be a little more formal in Qatar. Men working in finance or administration would be expected to wear a suit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,130 ✭✭✭James Bond Junior


    I have visited Oman, and I also have a few friends who moved from Qatar to Oman.

    One of the things that people tell me is that you are much more likely to have an opportunity to have social interactions with Omanis than with Qataris. The Omanis are not as wealthy, and you will find them running corner shops and driving taxis etc. jobs that you will never find a Qatari doing.

    Spot on. The Omanis are more "normal" and have to work to survive. I have Omani acquaintances more so than friends, mainly from the golf club I am a member. One is a fairly high up member of the Royal family and is an absolute gentleman. I'd be fairly friendly with him but he goes out of his way to as normal and down to earth as possible. But yes Omani's are a gentle and tolerant bunch with none of the entitlement or self importance of their gulf neighbours.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,097 ✭✭✭✭smurfjed


    I would rate Omanis as the friendliest, and strangely enough Saudi’s in second place. In the UAE, Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, I have never really interacted with locals, they just don’t appear to do jobs where you would interact with them.

    The World Cup will be a big deal next year, but are they seriously ready for football fans? What about the price of a beer, will it be within the budget of most fans. With games days apart, what are they golfing to do to keep these fans amused.


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    smurfjed wrote: »
    I would rate Omanis as the friendliest, and strangely enough Saudi’s in second place. In the UAE, Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, I have never really interacted with locals, they just don’t appear to do jobs where you would interact with them.

    The World Cup will be a big deal next year, but are they seriously ready for football fans? What about the price of a beer, will it be within the budget of most fans. With games days apart, what are they golfing to do to keep these fans amused.

    Usually you can only get a beer in a hotel bar, and they're all in 4 or 5 star hotels. A beer can easily cost 15 Euros, but usually there is a "happy hour" from 5-7 when selected beers (usually the most popular) are half price. They're generally OK with you ordering 2 or 3 more beers at 6:55.

    At the recent world club football finals in February there were Fan-zones set up near the stadium where they provided live music and alcohol. Most people think that was a "dry" run for the World Cup.

    I don't think there'll be as many fans travelling from Europe as there would be if the Cup was held in Europe, but they'll have no problem filling the stadiums with Saudis, Egyptians, Syrians etc. Every able-bodied Qatari will also attend every game that they can - they are stone mad for football. I have heard, its just a rumour, that Qatari companies have bought up all of the boxes and that unless you are a FIFA sponsor you won't be able to get a box.

    As for what the fans might to to stay amused I wonder myself if some fans will opt to base themselves in Dubai and fly in and out for the games.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 68 ✭✭YoshiReturns


    How does the country/culture handle/tolerate stuff like littering, illegal dumping, dog fouling, anti social behaviour, gangs ...
    Stuff that seems to get kid gloves treatment in Ireland and makes life depressing here ?


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    How does the country/culture handle/tolerate stuff like littering, illegal dumping, dog fouling, anti social behaviour, gangs ...
    Stuff that seems to get kid gloves treatment in Ireland and makes life depressing here ?

    Hi and thanks for the question.

    So the demographics of Qatar are nothing like what they are in most other countries:
    https://www.populationpyramid.net/qatar/2019/

    The vast majority of non-Qataris living in the country are here to work and to make money to send home, whether home is Berlin or Bangalore. Crime is exceptionally low and, where people are caught and jailed for criminal activity they are immediately deported on release. Serious anti-social behaviour might also result in deportation. But apart from the occasional westerner making an ass of himself/herself under the influence of alcohol, or minor burglaries, there is very little anti-social behavior among immigrants.

    Nobody under the age of 21 is allowed into a bar, so western teenagers mainly socialise at each others houses. Usually from about the age of 16 it is understood that there might be a few beers or glasses of wine available for those that want it. A surprisingly high number of kids don't drink and it's my impression that western teenagers are much more likely to have Indian or Arabic friends than their parents.

    Qatari teenagers aren't supposed to have access to drink, maybe some do, nowhere is perfect. But the biggest anti-social behaviour that you'll find Qatari boys up to is driving very fast in big SUVs. I prefer to keep well out of their way.

    Littering and illegal dumping are a problem in the country, and it is real shame to find litter in otherwise beautiful parts of the coastline or desert. The air quality is also not good in Doha and I would caution anyone with serious respiratory issues about coming to live here. The emissions from the oil and gas industries, and the related petro-chemical plants, and the dust caused by the scale of construction all combine with the natural sandy and dusty conditions to make air quality a real issue.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,242 ✭✭✭SCOOP 64


    Do you play the Guitar?


  • Registered Users Posts: 472 ✭✭Piehead


    What do you work at and what’s the salary like? How much income tax is there?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,804 ✭✭✭✭martingriff


    I personally believe that any Westerner who moves to authoritarian theocracies such as Qatar or the UAE are complicit in the human rights atrocities committed by the local regime. In other words the price for your high salary and standard of living is being paid for by slave labour+.

    What is your immediate response to my beliefs?

    Going off topic for a moment I remember there was an AMA in here with an American policeman and the only dissenting poster was asked not to post again.

    I wasn’t a member of the site then but I remember thinking that it was incredible that the moderators who ran this forum were allowing propaganda be issued on this site in favour of a paramilitary terrorist organisation like the US police.

    I’m just pointing this out because I think the same thing is happening here today, that a poster is using Boards.ie in order to distribute pro-Qatar propaganda. After George Floyd that first poster in the police thread will be perceived to be on the right side of history and so will I when the true extent of the atrocities committed in order to build the football stadiums(!) for Qatar 2022 emerge.



    +source: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/world-cup-2022-qatar-s-workers-slaves-building-mausoleums-stadiums-modern-slavery-kafala-a7980816.html

    Is that the first or second AMA as you should read what was asked in that question


  • Registered Users Posts: 505 ✭✭✭Kamu


    Hey, thank you for doing this AMA.

    How would you describe your working day? Working more hours/days compares to ireland? Working less overall?

    How is the work/life balance?

    Would you recommend Qatar to people to move to today? How about after the world cup?

    How do you survive the summer months? Are you not close to heat stroke constantly?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 20 Hdjsjsjsj


    Was it hard to adjust to the practices required? I was considering working in the middle East for maybe a year just to earn extra cash easily


  • Registered Users Posts: 460 ✭✭Yoghurt87


    Thanks OP for this very interesting AMA.

    My first question leads on from the previous post - in your experience do people who move over “for a year” to make a bit of money generally end up returning home as planned, or are they likely to stay on once they become attached to the bigger income and the perks of the expat package?

    Has Covid changed your work set-up at all? Is there more scope for working from home - whether that be in Qatar or even remotely from Ireland?

    In your opinion, what is the most common misconception Irish people have about life for westerners in Qatar?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,585 ✭✭✭circular flexing



    As for my own long-term plans, well if you are not Qatari you can only live in Qatar if you have a job. So when I retire, which is not far away, we will have to leave. Where will we go? I don't know, but somewhere in the EU.


    This is an interesting point - how does it make you feel that you have contributed to Qatari society by working there (remunerated well of course) but that society won't repay you by either allowing you to buy property or establish any right to permanent residence there?


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    SCOOP 64 wrote: »
    Do you play the Guitar?

    I'm afraid that I have given up on the dream of becoming a guitar legend.

    If you want to impress the locals then the pronunciation is closer to "cutter".

    There's a YouTube video for everything:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utP3PbWHZrU


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    Incidentally, there is a local guy called Hamad Al Amari who spent his teenage years in Dublin and is now a media celebrity in Qatar. There are lots of his videos on YouTube under "The Qatari Guy".

    Here he is taking a camel to the Burger King drive-thru:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeniC8YiToY


  • Company Representative Posts: 96 Verified rep I live in Qatar, AMA


    Piehead wrote: »
    What do you work at and what’s the salary like? How much income tax is there?

    I work as a management consultant, my salary is broadly twice what I was earning in Ireland (gross) before I came here, and there is no income tax in Qatar.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,097 ✭✭✭✭smurfjed


    Did the recent blockade by your neighbours have any impact at all?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,097 ✭✭✭✭smurfjed


    Are you including housing allowance in your salary, or is that completely separate ?


This discussion has been closed.
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