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Hyundai Kona/Ioniq38 battery replacement

  • 25-02-2021 10:19am
    #1
    Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,572 Mod ✭✭✭✭ slave1


    Official worldwide replacement now so rather than get buried in various threads thought it would be an idea for a single thread so folk can share as the recall progresses....


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,062 ✭✭✭ BigAl81


    Eek!

    RTE are reporting on this yesterday here.

    "Kona and Ioniq owners are advised to limit battery charging to 90% of capacity until the battery has been replaced, Hyundai's parent company said."

    No word from Hyundai Ireland letting people know that! I've pinged them on Twitter and on their chat on Hyundai.ie with the following message...

    "RTE reporting yesterday not to charge Kona's and some Ioniq's past 90% due to fire risk. Have heard nothing from Hyundai on this, can you confirm please? Also, will there be a battery recall / replacement in Ireland? "

    I'll let you know if I hear back.

    Al.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Will the Kona replace the Zafria B as the butt of all fire jokes? :D


  • Administrators, Computer Games Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 30,957 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ Mickeroo


    Will the Kona replace the Zafria B as the butt of all fire jokes? :D

    I think one of them will have to burn down a few buildings here before that happens :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,062 ✭✭✭ BigAl81


    To be fair, Hyundai replied quickly. However it's a nonsense / PR answer.

    "Many thanks for getting in touch. The situation for models sold in Europe is being investigated. To date, Hyundai is not aware of any crashes or fires in Europe confirmed to be directly attributable to this condition."

    They say "we are not aware" of issues in Europe, not that there are no issues. They also completely ignored my question about limiting charging to 90% as per the RTE article.

    Al.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,007 ✭✭✭✭ KCross


    Blame game still in progress....
    https://insideevs.com/news/490950/lg-energy-solution-suspected-cause-kona-fires/

    Seems it’s not the initially reported separator issue anyway.

    A manufacturing error on the anode and a badly programmed BMS are mentioned. I don’t think either side will admit fault as they’d have to take all the cost on board.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,749 ✭✭✭✭ emmet02


    Father's Kona has twice had to be towed off driveway after a full charge. Last time they said that they'd fixed it - no problems since, but should I be advising him to keep an eye on the charging and not leave it go above 90%? Seems to be conflicting suggestions in many places.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,346 ✭✭✭ Old diesel


    emmet02 wrote: »
    Father's Kona has twice had to be towed off driveway after a full charge. Last time they said that they'd fixed it - no problems since, but should I be advising him to keep an eye on the charging and not leave it go above 90%? Seems to be conflicting suggestions in many places.

    Imo charging to only 90 percent is a good idea as a precaution.

    Still have plenty of range at that level of charge


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,882 ✭✭✭ Smee_Again


    emmet02 wrote: »
    Father's Kona has twice had to be towed off driveway after a full charge. Last time they said that they'd fixed it - no problems since, but should I be advising him to keep an eye on the charging and not leave it go above 90%? Seems to be conflicting suggestions in many places.

    I've already set mine to stop at 90%, why take the risk and it's not like I've anywhere to go that I'd miss the the additional c. 45KM.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,729 ✭✭✭ zg3409


    On Facebook there is a chart saying manufacturing dates of the following European destined cars will be affected:

    Kona May 2018 to March 2020
    Ioniq38 June 2019 to January 2020

    UK/Irish models might be different dates due to different side steering wheel.
    Take all this with a pinch of salt. Presumably they will notify owners at some stage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,007 ✭✭✭✭ KCross


    Kramer wrote: »
    Plus didn't they recall Konas recently, to address an issue with the BMS? Probably trying to nerf the packs in some way, to minimise the possibility of fire.

    Just like Tesla, tinkering with their owners' MCUs, to get out of footing the bill for a massive, forced recall.

    What's his name in Australia, Kadoggin is it, on Youtube, is gonna have a ball with this news :D.
    eagerv wrote: »
    Yes, it will be interesting, seeing he owns one..

    He wasnt too harsh on them!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,346 ✭✭✭ Old diesel


    Would be interesting to know (if confirmed) why theres early 2020 cut off dates.

    Was there changes in production at that point????


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,003 ✭✭✭ fricatus


    KCross wrote: »
    He wasnt too harsh on them!

    Imagine if it had been Tesla though? He’d have been salivating! :D


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 6,026 Mod ✭✭✭✭ liamog


    Old diesel wrote: »
    Would be interesting to know (if confirmed) why theres early 2020 cut off dates.

    Was there changes in production at that point????

    If it is a problem with the cell separator in the battery cell, then it's likely that LG have made changes to the manufacturing process.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭ innrain


    I'm wondering how long it will take for the replacement to happen. You don't sit on 5GWh batteries on the shelf waiting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,909 ✭✭✭ eagerv


    I wonder whether they might offer a buy-back scheme?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,346 ✭✭✭ Old diesel


    liamog wrote: »
    If it is a problem with the cell separator in the battery cell, then it's likely that LG have made changes to the manufacturing process.

    Thats my thinking too.

    But confirmation that changes are made would be useful reassurance to customers.


  • Moderators Posts: 11,928 ✭✭✭✭ Black_Knight


    Seemingly is for ioniqs manufactured between June 2019 and Jan 2020 in Europe.

    Konas between may 2018 and march 2020. At least that's what I interpret from the post on Facebook allegedly from a Hyundai recall presentation.


  • Moderators Posts: 11,928 ✭✭✭✭ Black_Knight


    See image attached

    545226.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    a discounted upgrade to something desirable like an Ioniq 5 would be welcomed. VW did that for dieselgate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,729 ✭✭✭ zg3409


    zg3409 wrote: »
    On Facebook there is a chart saying manufacturing dates of the following European destined cars will be affected:

    Kona May 2018 to March 2020
    Ioniq38 June 2019 to January 2020

    UK/Irish models might be different dates due to different side steering wheel.
    Take all this with a pinch of salt. Presumably they will notify owners at some stage.

    Link to official Hyundai website confirming numbers and dates

    https://www.hyundai.com/content/hyundai/ww/data/ir/calendar/2021/0000000310/files/21-02-24-kona-ev-recall-presentation.pdf


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,729 ✭✭✭ zg3409


    https://insideevs.com/news/492387/hyundai-confirms-kona-electric-fires-cause/

    Hyundai Officially Confirms Folded Anode Tab Caused For Kona EV Fires


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,479 ✭✭✭ Miscreant


    zg3409 wrote: »

    Am I reading that correctly? Estimated cost of 1Tr KRW? 1 Trillion Korean Won... That is a 1 with 12 zeros after it! Over €740 million then which sounds like a lot considering the lion's share of that are Kona and Ioniq vehicles. The busses only account for 305 of the total (less than 0.4%). Averaging that out across all the vehicles in the recall, I doubt they are looking at a buy back scheme as it only allocates just over €9000 equivalent each...

    It isn't going to bring Hyundai down but wow, the mind boggles. Next question is though, who has the manufacturing capacity to build these new batteries and will it affect the further rollout of EVs in Hyundai's stable.

    I suppose it all remains to be seen.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,572 Mod ✭✭✭✭ slave1


    Miscreant wrote: »
    It isn't going to bring Hyundai down but wow, the mind boggles. Next question is though, who has the manufacturing capacity to build these new batteries and will it affect the further rollout of EVs in Hyundai's stable.

    That's it exactly, the real cost, they will have to give battery priority to replacement packs so new cars will suffer big time.

    Next issue, what will they do with all the battery packs they take back????


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,007 ✭✭✭✭ KCross


    zg3409 wrote: »
    https://insideevs.com/news/492387/hyundai-confirms-kona-electric-fires-cause/

    Hyundai Officially Confirms Folded Anode Tab Caused For Kona EV Fires

    That article is a bit misleading as it says its all LG's fault.
    I believe there is accepted responsibility on both sides. Its not just the anode issue.

    Its also that Hyundai didnt follow LG's recommended charge profile for the cells so they are splitting the costs 30/70 (Hyundai/LG).

    http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20210304001084


    So, clearly LG are shouldering the lions share. Expensive on both sides either way! If anything Hyundai is worse off as it's reputation is seriously affected now.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,572 Mod ✭✭✭✭ slave1


    Hyundai, you peaked with your first effort, the wonderful Ioniq28


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭ innrain


    US recall document


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,749 ✭✭✭✭ emmet02


    emmet02 wrote: »
    Father's Kona has twice had to be towed off driveway after a full charge. Last time they said that they'd fixed it - no problems since, but should I be advising him to keep an eye on the charging and not leave it go above 90%? Seems to be conflicting suggestions in many places.

    Should have updated on this.

    After having the car with Hyundai Ireland for 2 weeks last time, they said they replaced any problematic battery modules and fault should not reappear.

    Famous last words!

    Car charged overnight 2 weeks ago and when Dad got to it in the morning same error was back. Unable to start the car - big dead lump on the driveway.
    Car back with Hyundai Ireland since then, apparently having full battery replacement, we're yet to hear of a date when we should see it back.

    Loaner car same spec so Dad not too concerned, however does mean that anyone who thinks that their car has been sorted may need to think again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    Measuring voltage on the starter battery would be interesting. A multimeter only costs 5 quid. It tells you nothing about amperage but just knowing if the battery is at 12.6V then that is something.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭ innrain


    haphaphap wrote: »
    Measuring voltage on the starter battery would be interesting. A multimeter only costs 5 quid. It tells you nothing about amperage but just knowing if the battery is at 12.6V then that is something.
    OP refers to a different fault in the high voltage batteries that some Konas would developed after the last software upgrades. The software tightened to tolerances at high state  of charge and trows errors much faster. This was designed to eliminate potential causes for fires and detect those batteries with fault. Unfortunately didn't work and as it stands the recommendation from Hyundai (in US) is to limit the state of charge until the full battery is replaced. In the recall document posted few weeks ago:
    Hyundai plans to notify owners to bring their vehicles to the nearest
    Hyundai dealership for replacement of the BSA. As an interim step, Hyundai plans to notify owners to bring their vehicles to the nearest dealership to have the battery’s state of charge limit lowered to mitigate risk. Owners will also be provided with instructions to manually lower the battery’s state of charge limit via the infotainment system. If customers are unable to successfully make these changes, or do not feel comfortable making these changes, they will be advised to not park their car inside, in their garage or carport until after they have visited their dealer.
    emmet02 did your father charge the car to 100%?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,749 ✭✭✭✭ emmet02


    Was told not to (by me, but not Hyundai) - but yes car was charged to 100% when it became immobilised.


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