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Laser Bore sight?

  • 11-11-2020 12:23am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Got him!


    Anyone use a laser bore sight? Are they any good or are the really to just get you 'on paper' as they say with the fine tuning still to be done?


Comments

  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,534 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    From a previous post of mine:

    "Laser Boresighters are NOT a tool designed to get you on the bull from the off, but a tool to get you onto paper.

    The laser is a "line of sight" device. Meaning it shines a light in a straight line. No bullet travels like that so it can never zero the rifle for you. What it can do is help you see where the bore of the barrel is pointing, to a certain degree of accuracy, and then you can adjust the scope to match the laser's dot. Once on paper you can fine tune the POI by adjusting after each shot.

    For the price it's not worth it unless you are zeroing on a regular basis. A look down the bore will do the same job for free. The most any zeroing of a rifle should take is 3 shots, perhaps up to 5.

    Here is what i do. This is a quick guide from mounting the scope to the act of zeroing. All without a laser bore sight.


    Start at 50 yds. Check Rail/bases are securely fixed to receiver. Place scope onto receiver/rail/bases. Check for eye relief. Place the top piece of the rings back on and loosely screw down. Do not tighten yet. Once again check your eye relief. Use either spirit levels or the piece of string method to line up the crosshairs on your scope (or whatever works for you). Without moving the scope tighten down all screws. Tighten two screws at a time in opposite sides so as to bring the top of the ring down squarely. Now your scope is back on and ready to be sighted in.

    Turn the clicks on the scope (elevation) down to the lowest setting. Now turn the clicks on your windage adjustment all the way left (or right). Now turn it in the other direction while keeping count of the minutes/clicks. If its (for talks sake) 50 moa turn it back 25. Now your windage is centralised. Place the rifle in a clamp and check its level. When you look down the barrel make sure the circle made by the muzzle is central in the circle made by the breach.

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    Move the rifle (not your head) until the target (at least 2ft x 1.5ft with concentric circles) can be seen sitting perfectly central in the "ring" made by the muzzle.

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    Now keep the target in view through the barrel while trying to keep both "circles" central. Once you think you have the target in the barrel and all aspects centralised and secured, reclamp the rifle again making sure nothing moves. Now look through the scope and see where your crosshairs are in relation to the target. Adjust your elevation and windage turrets until the crosshair of the scope is on the centre of the target. Go between checking the bore sighting and scope to help minimise the difference in "point of impact".

    Once you're happy you're "on target" get ready to fire your first round.

    Bolt in and load a round. Steady yourself and fire. Check your point of impact. Adjust your scope the necessary clicks to compensate for elevation and windage. When you're happy you've adjusted the right amount load a second round and fire. You should be very close if not in the bull. Adjust scope again if necessary. Load and fire a third round. This one should be in the bull (weather and shooter permitting).

    Make note of the turret markings and record them as your 50 yd zero. Now move to 100yds and as far out as you wish.

    Of course you could always go for a bore sighter/ laser guide. It will help give you an idea of exactly where the bore is pointed, but if the guide is not of good quality or not used correctly when inserted it could point in a misleading way and not actually giving you the bore "direction".

    I'm a little overly critical of such devices as they don't actually do all the work so to me they perform a function you can do literally by eye and in less time than it takes to use such a device.

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  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Got him!


    That makes perfect sense! Thanks for that!!


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