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Changing Covid situation- how do you plan for 2021 races

  • #2
    Closed Accounts Posts: 376 ✭✭ Kurt_Godel.


    I had 2020 season all mapped out pre-Covid: had a map of Irish races and weekends away based on them, leading up to a big race in Amsterdam in Sept... obviously nothing happened to that plan. I managed to grab a few Hardman events which saved the season, but I was untrained and they certainly weren't in any training schedule...

    So what are people planning for 2021? Hopefully we will have a race calendar, but it may well be the same scenario... the obvious thing is to do winter training and fingers crossed, but does anyone have better plans than that?


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Comments

  • #2


    Train as if there will be a season but don't buy any new kit as they won't be many races. Certainly no IM sized events, major marathons etc. 2023 before that will be happening.


  • #2


    Same as above, normal winter training, perhaps less swimming if pools closed for periods of time.

    There’ll be club races, they’ll likely be small. I think what Hardman did is the model to follow.

    Even if we’re at level 1 you can only have 200 people at an event.

    Clubs could do 2 x 200 participant sprints in one day, or a sprint and an Olympic to get numbers through the gates.

    Plenty to train for :-)


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    Until the vaccine is rolled out ( which according to experts will be late 2020 / early 2021 in europe ) the above is correct, wont be anything happening big on the island until happens... but hopefully that goes to plan and were back to somewhat normality. Dont forget there is still ironman events happening in other parts of the world now. They even managed a tour de france! Dont be so pessimistic folks :)

    Similar to the Op, had a huge season planned, all canned this year.... got involved in cycling ireland racing and club cycle racing, ended up having a pretty busy year with racing, really worked on my bike & im entering winter with a solid bike racing season behind me. something I wouldnt have done pre covid and im really glad I did it. Winter block starts in 2 weeks & im looking forward to it.

    2021.... Mallorca 70.3, Cork Full & some National series. Early season road racing is on the cards for sure.


  • #2


    at the end of the day you really can only speculate.
    which means the races that happend this year or really tried hard to make it happen have the highest likelyhood to happen next year as they have shown to be flexible and i guess being flexible is key.
    i would say dont let fitness drop too much now but also focus less on an A race but plan more to be race ready at short notice.
    more importantly if you only train for race day than something is maybe not right, how you approach the sport since it is more about the process anyway.

    there is few people on this forum that are within 2 years before they can say they that they are anywhere near close to be the best they can be , so all the races they are doing or have missed this year or might miss next year have really not that much of a meaning in the big picture and a 2 to 4 year development plan would be much better than thinking to much about 2021.


  • #2


    I'll be concentrating more on short - medium term goals over the Winter I think. I never plan that far ahead anyway, but given that it could be a long winter of no swimming and misery some goals are needed to keep focus. I will establish some benchmarks for certain sessions, distances, (weight!), etc, and then set a target to achieve. I've also ordered a home gym that is due to be delivered tis week so I'll be working on the Dad bod :D


  • #2


    Hard to motivate yourself when there is no guarantee you're training for anything. Mulling over something more along the lines of deciding I'm training for say a half marathon and training towards it then doing a hard 13 mile run at the end. I can't see there being much of a 2021 season, agree with Tunney don't think there'll be big IM type events but can see us having a decent Irish tri calendar with small fields.


  • #2


    Some good points made above.

    I guess flexibility is the name of the game for the foreseeable future, with smaller fields and races likely to be cancelled at short notice. Personally the one good thing about this summer was managing to tick a few unexpected boxes without the pressure of a race (ROK bike, swim 10k, visit a few interesting places). Hopefully more of the same next year, and just keep training with fingers crossed and ready to race at the drop of a hat.


  • #2


    Entered Hardman 70.3 seems most likely of races to go ahead. I actually realise i really enjoy the training and not racing doesn't bother me so much. So will keep the training up. I'm still a newbie to tri though had planned on 2020 been the year to do loads of races but that didn't pan out. The year with no races was probably a blessing in disguise ive bought a barbell and weights and am following a plan the added strength will probably help me when racing comes around again. Even if it doesn't i feel better overall and added nearly 15kg so far in hopefully muscle mass.


  • #2


    new2tri19 wrote: »
    Entered Hardman 70.3 seems most likely of races to go ahead. I actually realise i really enjoy the training and not racing doesn't bother me so much. So will keep the training up. I'm still a newbie to tri though had planned on 2020 been the year to do loads of races but that didn't pan out. The year with no races was probably a blessing in disguise ive bought a barbell and weights and am following a plan the added strength will probably help me when racing comes around again. Even if it doesn't i feel better overall and added nearly 15kg so far in hopefully muscle mass.

    Added 15kg 😲😲😲

    On purpose?


  • #2


    EC1000 wrote: »


    Added 15kg 😲😲😲

    On purpose?

    Yes i was light enough at 67kg eating more protein and lifting has brought me up to 82kg , i suspect i will lose some of that when i start doing more cardio again.


  • #2


    new2tri19 wrote: »
    Yes i was light enough at 67kg eating more protein and lifting has brought me up to 82kg , i suspect i will lose some of that when i start doing more cardio again.

    Sorry, off topic.

    How has that affected your running? I'm 67ish kg also and trying to lose a bit to squeeze out a bit more run speed....


  • #2


    EC1000 wrote: »
    Sorry, off topic.

    How has that affected your running? I'm 67ish kg also and trying to lose a bit to squeeze out a bit more run speed....

    I was mainly a runner before triathlon never a great runner but ran consistently for a few years averaging about 50km a week. I was fairly thin and at 5 foot 11 and 62kg (the lightest i was) i was running about 18:30 for 5k.
    I was cycling in and out of work and then got into triathlon. Triathlon made me feel really weak , my arms would tire easy in the pool and turning 40 i decided i didn't want to grow old as that skinny runner. I think muscle mass is important as we get older. I wasn't overally concerned if i got slower in running or triathlon (its not like ill ever be challenging for podiums.)

    Anyway at 62kg i was running with a group for speed sessions doing all the right things and ran 18.30 (2018)
    I didn't train with club in 2019 or 2020 but 2019 did parkrun in 19.09 at 67kg.
    2020 much less running did a 5k time trial 19:30 at around 67 still.

    When i started weights i was eating a lot and found for the first 3 weeks to a month that my runs felt horrible and sluggish really heavy legs. I did a small bit of speed work and actually felt stronger doing 400's at 82kg than 67.

    I actually did a 5k TT last week and ran 19.33 , i am running much less than i was prior so to i would say it hasn't effected my running that much. I suppose if you put on 15kg of fat you would be slower but my legs have noticeable muscle mass now so that must help somewhat.

    Sorry for the long winded answer , a pleasant suprise is my swim is much stronger. I would defintly feel stronger overall and healthier now. I am following gzclp plan doing compound lifts.


  • #2


    Thanks for taking the time to reply. You seem to have a good perspective on things, everything is a balance! I have a running focus now also so weight is key for me - my goals for the moment are all running related.


  • #2


    due to sea water temp, weight gain is also very important for me . yesterdays sea swim was actually the first really enjoyable...

    i guess i was shammed to enjoy it by the 2 young kids that had so much fun playing in the water...


  • #2


    I want to train on the turbo over the winter with Hardman Waterville as the goal. The course profile looks hilly , has anyone experience of it? What bike would be quicker a Tri bike or road bike thanks? If tri is quicker ill use that on turbo so i am used to the position.


  • #2


    there is maybe 5 races in europe where a road bike would be faster
    there is a few where it might be a wash but there is not a single race in ireland where a road bike would be faster. if you adjust the fit for a hilly course on tt bike at the end its about making changes to bike fit depending on the course . ie my bike fit for a hilly course would be different than for a flat course , crank lenght is something to consider hipp ankle and balance . ie weight should be more backwards on a hilly course . and of course the right gearing.

    the bigger problem is that most athletes have a really bad position on either bike.


  • #2


    peter kern wrote: »
    there is maybe 5 races in europe where a road bike would be faster
    there is a few where it might be a wash but there is not a single race in ireland where a road bike would be faster. if you adjust the fit for a hilly course on tt bike at the end its about making changes to bike fit depending on the course . ie my bike fit for a hilly course would be different than for a flat course , crank lenght is something to consider hipp ankle and balance . ie weight should be more backwards on a hilly course . and of course the right gearing.

    the bigger problem is that most athletes have a really bad position on either bike.

    Thanks Peter very interesting i would have expected the road bike to be quicker given the elevation profile but i bow to your superior knowledge. Lookng at photos most seem to opt for TT bike.
    I've never had a bike fit maybe it will be a worthwhile investment.


  • #2


    I only got a last minute transfer into Waterville this year, and because of this, I ended up using my road bike in the race. Comparing results that day with the half in Bantry 2 weeks later, it certainly looks like I left some time out on the course. But it was a horrible day for cycling, and I was honestly delighted I didn't have to take on the descents on my tri-bike. On wet roads, I think it could potentially be a sixth European race where one might be better off on a road bike.

    As you know, that comes with the caveat that I am a woeful descender.


  • #2


    zico10 wrote: »
    I only got a last minute transfer into Waterville this year, and because of this, I ended up using my road bike in the race. Comparing results that day with the half in Bantry 2 weeks later, it certainly looks like I left some time out on the course. But it was a horrible day for cycling, and I was honestly delighted I didn't have to take on the descents on my tri-bike. On wet roads, I think it could potentially be a sixth European race where one might be better off on a road bike.

    As you know, that comes with the caveat that I am a woeful descender.


    for somebody like you a tt bike with a road handlebar a la chrissie wellington would likely be the fastst config for courses like this but i would agree in the rain it would be quite close as a road bar handlebar does allow better control . but if your tri bike had disc brakes and your road bike not it would be a difficult call again.
    and i agree in the rain this would be one of the very few races where i would think a disc break makes really sense on a tt bike.

    at the end there is so many varialbes cannondale slice which is one of the best handling tt bikes versus felt ia which according to someobdy i know is the worst handling tt bike .... set up ,bike handling skills
    how much you draft in a race the more you do the earlier a road bike will make sense etc etc.


  • #2


    Is swimming a waste of time? I got in the pool again after a long break and my swim times are not that far off what i was swimming previously and it got me thinking it's such a small part of a triathlon race that surely it can't be the best use of your training time if your a time crunched athlete. Assuming the athlete can swim say 2mins per 100 for a race effort.

    I'm training with a 70.3 goal next year and some days its a choice between an hour run or 30-40 min swim. If i swim once a week and run the other 3 lunch breaks i think my run would be in really good shape. If i swim 3 days a week my swim will be much stronger but how much probably 10 seconds per 100m - thats just over 3 mins for a half ironman. I think unless your at the top of your game where every second counts its not really worth it. Them 2 hours not swimming getting a run tempo and interval session i would expect to see a much greater gain than 3 mins . Am i missing something?


  • #2


    It isn't just about being fast in the water, is also about not being tired when you get out. No point in having a super fast run if you are knackered by the time you get to the run.


  • #2


    new2tri19 wrote: »
    Is swimming a waste of time? I got in the pool again after a long break and my swim times are not that far off what i was swimming previously and it got me thinking it's such a small part of a triathlon race that surely it can't be the best use of your training time if your a time crunched athlete. Assuming the athlete can swim say 2mins per 100 for a race effort.

    I'm training with a 70.3 goal next year and some days its a choice between an hour run or 30-40 min swim. If i swim once a week and run the other 3 lunch breaks i think my run would be in really good shape. If i swim 3 days a week my swim will be much stronger but how much probably 10 seconds per 100m - thats just over 3 mins for a half ironman. I think unless your at the top of your game where every second counts its not really worth it. Them 2 hours not swimming getting a run tempo and interval session i would expect to see a much greater gain than 3 mins . Am i missing something?

    What are your swim times like towards the end of your sessions? I’m back in the pool after a break like everyone else and it’s all grand if I stick to 100s and 200s, but form and speed goes to pot if I try a 400 or when I’ve more than about 1,500m done. I’m finding I’m using the pull buoy all the time whilst I try get the front end of my stroke and my swim fitness back. That said I’m not as bad as I was after the first much longer lockdown.


  • #2


    new2tri19 wrote: »
    Is swimming a waste of time? I got in the pool again after a long break and my swim times are not that far off what i was swimming previously and it got me thinking it's such a small part of a triathlon race that surely it can't be the best use of your training time if your a time crunched athlete. Assuming the athlete can swim say 2mins per 100 for a race effort.

    I'm training with a 70.3 goal next year and some days its a choice between an hour run or 30-40 min swim. If i swim once a week and run the other 3 lunch breaks i think my run would be in really good shape. If i swim 3 days a week my swim will be much stronger but how much probably 10 seconds per 100m - thats just over 3 mins for a half ironman. I think unless your at the top of your game where every second counts its not really worth it. Them 2 hours not swimming getting a run tempo and interval session i would expect to see a much greater gain than 3 mins . Am i missing something?


    i would say the time crunched athlete should not do longer distances ...
    easier to get to ones potentilal in shorter distacnes if one is time crunched.
    ... or taking it even further
    why not go duathlon . or just single sport with your thinking .


  • #2


    There are many benefits to swim training, it's not all about knocking off seconds per 100!! Great core workout, stretching and improved flexibility to name but a few.
    Maybe the issue is - do you like swimming or not?


  • #2


    I actually love swimming and it's a hobby I will keep up even after triathlon. I feel like good swimmers are penalised as swimming is such a small part of the race and hard to make huge inroads on bad swimmers.
    I enjoy swim bike and run but let's say you purely want to get faster overall , prioritising bike would seem like best bang for buck and then run , with swim a distant last.

    Interestingly was listening to Brian Mc crystal interview and he said he only got in the water twice before Hardman and set a course record . I understand he's elite cyclist but no one is saying he should take up duathlon.
    Just an observation I've nothing against swimming quite the opposite actually ..


  • #2


    It's a good observation in that the proportion of swimming in a triathlon is "unfair" when compared to the other disciplines, especially at half and full distances. (A fairer ratio might be 1:10:4, but that's a whole other argument:D)

    Including swim training into your weekly routine will allow you to rest other muscle groups and aid recovery, while improving overall fitness (and obviously targeting swim fitness).

    You seem to enjoy swimming, but if your swim times are the same before and after an extended break from the pool, there's huge overall gains waiting if you get pool time 3 or 4 times a week.


  • #2


    It's a good observation in that the proportion of swimming in a triathlon is "unfair" when compared to the other disciplines, especially at half and full distances. (A fairer ratio might be 1:10:4, but that's a whole other argument:D)

    Including swim training into your weekly routine will allow you to rest other muscle groups and aid recovery, while improving overall fitness (and obviously targeting swim fitness).

    You seem to enjoy swimming, but if your swim times are the same before and after an extended break from the pool, there's huge overall gains waiting if you get pool time 3 or 4 times a week.

    I don't mean to rustle anyones feathers on the subject, theres nothing nicer than getting in the pool on a good day and your swimming on top of the water. As i got better at swimming i've started to wish swimming was a bigger part of the sport.

    I do really enjoy it and the sport as a whole and i know peter mentioned there don't train for it if you haven't got the time but with 4 kids and the youngest still a baby there might never be an optimum time to train and i have goals i'd like to achieve and test myself on. Somedays with the kids football and gaa and other training you only get an hour at lunch or so and its a choice between a run or a swim. Ideal world id swim everyday but i'm 40 now and i'll still be carting the youngest around to football training etc in 10 years so you gotta make the most of your time.


  • #2


    new2tri19 wrote: »
    I actually love swimming and it's a hobby I will keep up even after triathlon. I feel like good swimmers are penalised as swimming is such a small part of the race and hard to make huge inroads on bad swimmers.
    I enjoy swim bike and run but let's say you purely want to get faster overall , prioritising bike would seem like best bang for buck and then run , with swim a distant last.

    Interestingly was listening to Brian Mc crystal interview and he said he only got in the water twice before Hardman and set a course record . I understand he's elite cyclist but no one is saying he should take up duathlon.
    Just an observation I've nothing against swimming quite the opposite actually ..

    but then when he races atheltes at his level the swim always bites him.
    so usually the saying that you cant win a race in the swim but lose it still holds true most of the time.
    or messi will do well in the irish soccer league if he dosnt train for 4 years and when he is 45.


    and of course i know he was in the water more than twice ...


  • #2


    Like you I enjoy the swimming - and like Kurt mentioned I feel that a short swim at the end of the day will help stretch out the muscles if I have run or turbo earlier in day. I really noticed it this week, when hopping in for the first swim in about 5 weeks and woke the next morning feeling a lot freer than I have in a while. I did struggle with distance, so keeping it to 100m sets for now, and in week or two will go for 200, and build etc

    FWIW - My thinking for this time of the year is to swim shorter sessions (~1-1.5km) and focus on technique for maybe the next 2 months, then try build up some speed for another 2 months and then adding in the endurance part around end of March/April.


  • #2


    It's a good observation in that the proportion of swimming in a triathlon is "unfair" when compared to the other disciplines, especially at half and full distances. (A fairer ratio might be 1:10:4, but that's a whole other argument:D)

    Including swim training into your weekly routine will allow you to rest other muscle groups and aid recovery, while improving overall fitness (and obviously targeting swim fitness).

    You seem to enjoy swimming, but if your swim times are the same before and after an extended break from the pool, there's huge overall gains waiting if you get pool time 3 or 4 times a week.


    i wounder how many people in ireland would enter a 2 20 6 , 3 40 10 or 4 60 12 or 5 90 21 race. one would hope superleague the pto champs will help to make distacnes more creative


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