Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

What do you believe happens when we die

Options
1356726

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 13,927 ✭✭✭✭Thelonious Monk


    People are just clutching at straws hoping death isn't the end. It's the basis for all religions, that and trying to instill fear in people so they can control them.
    There is absolutely nothing that has ever given us anything resembling evidence to show our consciousness carries on. It's fairy tale stuff. Our brains are a bit more clever than the other animals on the planet, so we constructed this fantasy.
    And is it only humans who go to an afterlife? What about other sentient animals like gorillas or dolphins?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,935 ✭✭✭trashcan


    Peregrinus wrote: »
    There's not much point in telling us this unless you are going to go on and tell su what the idea is - you tease, you!

    You have to sign up and subscribe to his newsletter first !


  • Registered Users Posts: 350 ✭✭Elwood_Blues


    What about other sentient animals like gorillas or dolphins?

    They go and live on that huge farm with all the other animals..


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,359 ✭✭✭LessOutragePlz


    People are just clutching at straws hoping death isn't the end. It's the basis for all religions, that and trying to instill fear in people so they can control them.
    There is absolutely nothing that has ever given us anything resembling evidence to show our consciousness carries on. It's fairy tale stuff. Our brains are a bit more clever than the other animals on the planet, so we constructed this fantasy.
    And is it only humans who go to an afterlife? What about other sentient animals like gorillas or dolphins?

    I don't necessarily believe in an afterlife but I believe our consciousness continues on in another form. Our body definitely dies but I don't think our consciousness does.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,927 ✭✭✭✭Thelonious Monk


    I don't necessarily believe in an afterlife but I believe our consciousness continues on in another form. Our body definitely dies but I don't think our consciousness does.

    but only humans, not other intelligent animals?


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 13,927 ✭✭✭✭Thelonious Monk


    They go and live on that huge farm with all the other animals..

    I hope those 2000 pigs that burned to death in the North the other day are in heaven now. The fact we're capable of treating other smart animals this way says it all about humans. We're not special or holy or going to heaven, we're a bloody virus on the planet.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭Bannasidhe


    Peregrinus wrote: »
    That would be quite painful, surely?



    (I'll get my coat.)

    To quote Julian Cleary, as long as it's not up my chocolate whizzway...




    (Hold the door. I am also getting me coat)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,359 ✭✭✭LessOutragePlz


    but only humans, not other intelligent animals?

    I can't speak for other animals as I don't know how they experience the world. I think we all come from the same source of consciousness like waves from the ocean. Every wave is different but they all come from the ocean just as each wave of consciousness in us is different but they all come from the same source.

    I think it's just one of the mysteries of life, like how we can't see our own eyes without a mirror or how we can't taste our own tongue.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,316 ✭✭✭nthclare


    Bannasidhe wrote: »
    Firstly - that is a response. A petulant one granted but still a response.

    Secondly - this is a discussion forum. You made a statement in which you essentially made a judgement call about other posters based on a single factual phrase which made no reference to an afterlife (and the phrase you used to make your dig was used by only 2 posters - myself included). I, as one of the targets of your dig, am calling you out on it.

    Now, you can explain how you managed to figure that Statement A actually means X,Y,Z and we can discuss that or you can refuse to engage in an honest discussion on a statement you made in a discussion forum. Or you can skulk off having been called out.

    You like to play the victim and have claimed that the mods - myself in particular - are out to get you when as the post I called you out on clearly shows you can't help but having a go albeit by twisting what was written. You made the decision to have a go. No-one forced you. You wrote what you wrote and hit submit. A number of posters immediately called you on it.
    Now, I am not writing this as a mod. I am writing this as a poster who has been 'judged' and exercising my right to reply.
    If you are big enough to deal it out you should be big enough to accept when there is a push back.

    It's like this now there's a lot of people who like to suggest that all we are at the end is a rotting corpse.
    I've experienced atheists say this to thiests and they seem to think we're basically an organic computer that shuts down and rots.
    And they play on it for a reaction.

    As an artist/poet/gardener in my opinion that's a very narrow view and in itself it's my view, I'm not calling anyone out.
    If I say I don't like the way so and so farm's her or his land or looks after her or his animals animals,it doesn't mean all farmers are the same.

    I didn't read the post's before mine, I don't seek validation from people's posts or get rilled up because of an opinion and personalise it.

    There's a lot of people getting upset or triggered in conversations on board's and that's a waste of energy, you suggested that I play the victim.
    Far from it, I post metaphorically a lot I don't personalise my post's.

    I'm not out to upset anyone either.
    As you'll see that my post's in other forums I call a spade a spade.

    My opinion shouldn't matter to you,as you're well aware that you're a good person yourself.
    I've no problem with anyone who posts here, if someone wants to say whatever it's their opinion.

    But if someone's Idea of all we are in the end is a rotten corpse, which stinks decays and that's it.
    I've every right to suggest that's not a nice way to look at it and from my perspective it's a very narrow and shallow way to look at a lifespan.

    And you're right, we do decay and maybe that's it, but the stardust sounds more adventurous and mystical than what I suggest isn't nice.

    So it's better people don't get triggered by my post's, it's not worth validating your opinion on mine.

    So if my post upset your good self, it wasn't my intention.

    Using language like I can skulk off or I'm playing the victim is just a red rag to a sink full of bubbles and soap, so that's just trying to get an emotive response.

    So we'll leave it there then :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 350 ✭✭Elwood_Blues


    nthclare wrote: »
    It's like this now there's a lot of people who like to suggest that all we are at the end is a rotting corpse.
    I've experienced atheists say this to thiests and they seem to think we're basically an organic computer that shuts down and rots.
    And they play on it for a reaction.

    As an artist/poet/gardener in my opinion that's a very narrow view and in itself it's my view, I'm not calling anyone out.
    If I say I don't like the way so and so farm's her or his land or looks after her or his animals animals,it doesn't mean all farmers are the same.

    I didn't read the post's before mine, I don't seek validation from people's posts or get rilled up because of an opinion and personalise it.

    There's a lot of people getting upset or triggered in conversations on board's and that's a waste of energy, you suggested that I play the victim.
    Far from it, I post metaphorically a lot I don't personalise my post's.

    I'm not out to upset anyone either.
    As you'll see that my post's in other forums I call a spade a spade.

    My opinion shouldn't matter to you,as you're well aware that you're a good person yourself.
    I've no problem with anyone who posts here, if someone wants to say whatever it's their opinion.

    But if someone's Idea of all we are in the end is a rotten corpse, which stinks decays and that's it.
    I've every right to suggest that's not a nice way to look at it and from my perspective it's a very narrow and shallow way to look at a lifespan.

    And you're right, we do decay and maybe that's it, but the stardust sounds more adventurous and mystical than what I suggest isn't nice.

    So it's better people don't get triggered by my post's, it's not worth validating your opinion on mine.

    So if my post upset your good self, it wasn't my intention.

    Using language like I can skulk off or I'm playing the victim is just a red rag to a sink full of bubbles and soap, so that's just trying to get an emotive response.

    So we'll leave it there then :)


    source.gif


  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭Bannasidhe


    nthclare wrote: »
    It's like this now there's a lot of people who like to suggest that all we are at the end is a rotting corpse.
    I've experienced atheists say this to thiests and they seem to think we're basically an organic computer that shuts down and rots.
    And they play on it for a reaction.

    As an artist/poet/gardener in my opinion that's a very narrow view and in itself it's my view, I'm not calling anyone out.
    If I say I don't like the way so and so farm's her or his land or looks after her or his animals animals,it doesn't mean all farmers are the same.

    I didn't read the post's before mine, I don't seek validation from people's posts or get rilled up because of an opinion and personalise it.

    There's a lot of people getting upset or triggered in conversations on board's and that's a waste of energy, you suggested that I play the victim.
    Far from it, I post metaphorically a lot I don't personalise my post's.

    I'm not out to upset anyone either.
    As you'll see that my post's in other forums I call a spade a spade.

    My opinion shouldn't matter to you,as you're well aware that you're a good person yourself.
    I've no problem with anyone who posts here, if someone wants to say whatever it's their opinion.

    But if someone's Idea of all we are in the end is a rotten corpse, which stinks decays and that's it.
    I've every right to suggest that's not a nice way to look at it and from my perspective it's a very narrow and shallow way to look at a lifespan.

    And you're right, we do decay and maybe that's it, but the stardust sounds more adventurous and mystical than what I suggest isn't nice.

    So it's better people don't get triggered by my post's, it's not worth validating your opinion on mine.

    So if my post upset your good self, it wasn't my intention.

    Using language like I can skulk off or I'm playing the victim is just a red rag to a sink full of bubbles and soap, so that's just trying to get an emotive response.

    So we'll leave it there then :)

    Yes, some here do think in the end we are all rotting corpses - although no-one had stated that in those terms - and the 2 people who used that phrase certainly said nothing of the kind -and the whole analogy was like O'Leary in the grave until you decided to use it to have a go - and yes, calling people narcissistic etc etc is being judgemental.

    No one said you can't be judgemental - but if you are going to be you must also be prepared to be called on it.
    When your response to being called out is trying to shut down that line of discussion that is, calling a spade a spade and a shovel full of manure a shovel full of manure, trying to skulk away.

    Admitting you hadn't bothered to read the posts before you decided to call other posters empty shells is not the stunning defense you seem to think it is.
    It actually makes your post look even more judgemental tbh and deeply deeply shallow.

    You could have just said all of the above - wrote about what you believe. You didn't though. You jumped in said "It's interesting to see people who describe themselves as a rotting corpse when they pass, sounds like a metaphor for their lifestyle in general.
    Just empty shell's, forever perputatuated in resentment, narcisissim and negativity."

    You decided to write that.
    I decided to call you on it.
    I did that because I thought your post was a pile of steaming, judgemental, having a go, manure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,317 ✭✭✭AllForIt


    I believe I'll return to the state I was in before I was born.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭Bannasidhe


    AllForIt wrote: »
    I believe I'll return to the state I was in before I was born.

    That is interesting and I can see the logic - but it begs the question what state was that?
    Again no one knows 'where' we were, or if we even 'were', before we were - if you see what I mean.

    Personally, I am not of the we die and it's like we never were school of thought - I would be closer to the Buddhists in terms of thinking of us as energy that continues in other forms than any notion of 'I' as a person continuing as a 'me' but sans 'rotting corpse'.

    It makes no sense to me that the data our brains accumulate (most of which we have no need for in purely survival terms) is a pointless exercise. Nature wasting so much energy just does not compute with me.

    I also do not believe (first time I have used that in this discussion) that humans are 'special' (I actually think we are a fairly awful species tbh) - if something happens after death it would be my belief the same something happens to all living forms. Life = energy and all that.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 72 ✭✭Spleodar


    If you think about it the human mind/brain has evolved enough to be able to express abstract ideas about existence. I don’t think awareness of mortality or loss is unique to humans - all animals fear death and all social animals mourn loss of those close to them, but we are the only ones who can discuss it.

    For obvious reasons, the concept of death and morality is extremely unpleasant and we are naturally frightened of it and I’m not quite sure that our minds can really just accept that one day we cease to exist. Even if they can accept it, it sits extremely uncomfortably with us as what that experience is is unknowable.

    To me, religious answers to questions like that are ways of providing a mind that needs answers with answers, whether they’re accurate or fantasy, they fill a hole in narrative and provide comfort. Even without formal religious beliefs, people often believe in ghosts, have full blown imagined conversations with ancestors, talk to them at grave sides and all sorts of things.

    The thought that we all just switch off one day and cease to exist is grim and we just seem to have to cling to a hope that whether it’s religious notions, spiritual or questionable science and philosophy about energy and consciousness somehow hanging around after we’re gone, it’s about plugging that gap in logic and narrative and avoiding ever confronting that we are probably time limited.

    Before you were born there’s just no awareness of anything. Even when you’re under a general anaesthetic time appears to have stopped, so consciousness seems likely to be some kind of incredibly complex model interpreting the world, running on a trillion connections in your brain all of which evolved organically, effectively building itself over millions of years to interact more successfully with its environment. It’s a remarkable system when you consider just how complicated it is. It even seems to contain possibly a petabyte or so of data and manages to do what would take machines vast data centres and gigawatts of energy, in something that fits inside your head, uses around 20 watts and can run on a cheese sandwich (which, in itself is an extremely complicated device when you consider what wheat is or how you’d make a cow to make milk, or bacteria to make cheese...)

    Then you’ve also got the social control element of it. Many, many religious beliefs seem to be about collecting brownie points for the after life and in some cases that has positive impacts and in others, they’re prioritising an imagined afterlife over actual existence and can do horrible things with notions of being rewarded in heaven and those beliefs have been used by many individuals, cults, sects and organised religions and even military leaders to justify all sorts of atrocities and to override human altruism and empathy.

    My view of it personally is that all we know is that we leave a legacy of memories. Some of us leave a legacy of genetic code by reproducing, plenty of us don’t. So it’s really to me about participating in society and trying to leave positive legacy, be nice to people and enjoy life. If existence is only for a few decades, you might as well make the most of it.

    We do all go on in a way, but the only way we know we do is in memories of others or artificial memories like writing, painting, recordings or nowadays online posts and all the stuff we did, be it big and influential or small. Every interaction leaves a memory somewhere. So my personal philosophy is make them good ones.

    To my anyway, that’s not necessarily a bleak outlook. It’s just seeing the place for what it is, rather than pondering what it isn’t.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭Bannasidhe


    Spleodar wrote: »
    If you think about it the human mind/brain has evolved enough to be able to express abstract ideas about existence. I don’t think awareness of mortality or loss is unique to humans - all animals fear death and all social animals mourn loss of those close to them, but we are the only ones who can discuss it.

    For obvious reasons, the concept of death and morality is extremely unpleasant and we are naturally frightened of it and I’m not quite sure that our minds can really just accept that one day we cease to exist. Even if they can accept it, it sits extremely uncomfortably with us as what that experience is is unknowable.

    To me, religious answers to questions like that are ways of providing a mind that needs answers with answers, whether they’re accurate or fantasy, they fill a hole in narrative and provide comfort. Even without formal religious beliefs, people often believe in ghosts, have full blown imagined conversations with ancestors, talk to them at grave sides and all sorts of things.

    The thought that we all just switch off one day and cease to exist is grim and we just seem to have to cling to a hope that whether it’s religious notions, spiritual or questionable science and philosophy about energy and consciousness somehow hanging around after we’re gone, it’s about plugging that gap in logic and narrative and avoiding ever confronting that we are probably time limited.

    Before you were born there’s just no awareness of anything. Even when you’re under a general anaesthetic time appears to have stopped, so consciousness seems likely to be some kind of incredibly complex model interpreting the world, running on a trillion connections in your brain all of which evolved organically, effectively building itself over millions of years to interact more successfully with its environment. It’s a remarkable system when you consider just how complicated it is. It even seems to contain possibly a petabyte or so of data and manages to do what would take machines vast data centres and gigawatts of energy, in something that fits inside your head, uses around 20 watts and can run on a cheese sandwich (which, in itself is an extremely complicated device when you consider what wheat is or how you’d make a cow to make milk, or bacteria to make cheese...)

    Then you’ve also got the social control element of it. Many, many religious beliefs seem to be about collecting brownie points for the after life and in some cases that has positive impacts and in others, they’re prioritising an imagined afterlife over actual existence and can do horrible things with notions of being rewarded in heaven and those beliefs have been used by many individuals, cults, sects and organised religions and even military leaders to justify all sorts of atrocities and to override human altruism and empathy.

    My view of it personally is that all we know is that we leave a legacy of memories. Some of us leave a legacy of genetic code by reproducing, plenty of us don’t. So it’s really to me about participating in society and trying to leave positive legacy, be nice to people and enjoy life. If existence is only for a few decades, you might as well make the most of it.

    We do all go on in a way, but the only way we know we do is in memories of others or artificial memories like writing, painting, recordings or nowadays online posts and all the stuff we did, be it big and influential or small. Every interaction leaves a memory somewhere. So my personal philosophy is make them good ones.

    To my anyway, that’s not necessarily a bleak outlook. It’s just seeing the place for what it is, rather than pondering what it isn’t.

    Thanks didn't seem enough so I'm quoting to express my appreciation of this post.
    True food for thought.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭nozzferrahhtoo


    nthclare wrote: »
    Stardust is beautiful

    So is the circle of life. And despite calling YOURSELF open minded earlier, while suggesting others have tunnel vision.... the fact is that through our science we can see beauty even in rot and decay. Because through our science we know what that rot and decay is. It is life (like bacteria) feeding on other ex-life in a circular process that begets further life.

    So you can look at rot and decry it, and look at people who acknowledge it and insult them. But the really open minded of us look at rot and decay and see the beauty inside it too. It does not have to be happy slappy twinkly star-stuff to be beautiful. At least outside YOUR world.
    nthclare wrote: »
    As you'll see that my post's in other forums I call a spade a spade.

    And yet when other people do exactly that, you insult them. One rule for you and one for everyone else I guess? Because....
    nthclare wrote: »
    I've every right to suggest that's not a nice way to look at it and from my perspective it's a very narrow and shallow way to look at a lifespan.

    ..... they call the spade a spade and all you can do is moan about it. And I mean moan given that ALSO no one at all suggested you did not have the right above. Always weird to me when people get offended they feel the need to not only assert their rights, but specifically rights no one challenged or inhibited in the first place.
    nthclare wrote: »
    And you're right, we do decay and maybe that's it, but the stardust sounds more adventurous and mystical than what I suggest isn't nice.

    And as I said that's just because it is happy slappy TO YOU. But those of us who know more science about the circle of life and existence can see no more (or less) beauty in the concept of star dust creating us and our bodies.... than we do rot and decay.

    Because when I look at my life I do not just need to see the pretty twinkle twinkle little star of my youth to be in awe of it. Rather I can view the bigger picture of EVERYTHING, including rot and decay, that went before me that led up to the moment of my conception and instantiation. You and I are literally here BECAUSE of rot and decay, and because tiny little organisms we can not even see make a party on corpses when they die. That's beautiful too.

    And no one part is more or less beautiful than any other to me, because I do not run the narratives on my neck top computer that you do to parse it all through. And that does not make me narcissistic, empty, close minded, or any other insult you want to fling mud around with in your little play box in the garden.
    Bannasidhe wrote: »
    (Hold the door. I am also getting me coat)

    Makes Gay innuendos.

    Gets their coats and leave together.

    People will talk :)


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭Bannasidhe



    Makes Gay innuendos.

    Gets their coats and leave together.

    People will talk :)

    Well this is a discussion forum.
    :p


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,039 ✭✭✭✭El_Duderino 09


    I don't necessarily believe in an afterlife but I believe our consciousness continues on in another form. Our body definitely dies but I don't think our consciousness does.

    Why do you think that?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,576 ✭✭✭Dr. Bre


    Best to ask people with near death experiences


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,316 ✭✭✭nthclare


    Like the other poster I prefer to leave a legacy behind me.

    And a good old fashioned pagan/heathen sermony, up in the Burren overlooking Galway bay.
    Or the opposite if I'm being buried in a church graveyard I'd prefer a ruin of a church or monastery in a wild place in the middle of nowhere.

    Id prefer to go to some other dimension or state of consciousness, I'm too curious and creative to believe that that's it.
    Poof gone...my brain can't cognitively believe that.
    Whether it's delusional thinking or Fantasyland I like it all the same.

    I love folklore and mythology unsolved mysteries etc and a dreamer, love taking photos and looking for faces behind shrubs and trees.
    I love patterns and abstract art, my eyes and mind creates shape's and when I circle them people can see what I mean.

    I've amazing pictures of thing's that pop up in photograph's in my Google photo album.

    They're probably not there but the mind and creativity is able to see the shape's like a shadow I got recently in the woods near Doolough Co Clare.

    It looked like a demonic figure standing there, watching me...


  • Advertisement
  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,316 ✭✭✭nthclare


    So is the circle of life. And despite calling YOURSELF open minded earlier, while suggesting others have tunnel vision.... the fact is that through our science we can see beauty even in rot and decay. Because through our science we know what that rot and decay is. It is life (like bacteria) feeding on other ex-life in a circular process that begets further life.

    So you can look at rot and decry it, and look at people who acknowledge it and insult them. But the really open minded of us look at rot and decay and see the beauty inside it too. It does not have to be happy slappy twinkly star-stuff to be beautiful. At least outside YOUR world.



    And yet when other people do exactly that, you insult them. One rule for you and one for everyone else I guess? Because....



    ..... they call the spade a spade and all you can do is moan about it. And I mean moan given that ALSO no one at all suggested you did not have the right above. Always weird to me when people get offended they feel the need to not only assert their rights, but specifically rights no one challenged or inhibited in the first place.



    And as I said that's just because it is happy slappy TO YOU. But those of us who know more science about the circle of life and existence can see no more (or less) beauty in the concept of star dust creating us and our bodies.... than we do rot and decay.

    Because when I look at my life I do not just need to see the pretty twinkle twinkle little star of my youth to be in awe of it. Rather I can view the bigger picture of EVERYTHING, including rot and decay, that went before me that led up to the moment of my conception and instantiation. You and I are literally here BECAUSE of rot and decay, and because tiny little organisms we can not even see make a party on corpses when they die. That's beautiful too.

    And no one part is more or less beautiful than any other to me, because I do not run the narratives on my neck top computer that you do to parse it all through. And that does not make me narcissistic, empty, close minded, or any other insult you want to fling mud around with in your little play box in the garden.



    Makes Gay innuendos.

    Gets their coats and leave together.

    People will talk :)

    Ah sure we're all different and I did say that I didn't mean to offend anyone and I apologized if I have so.

    I accept that my post wasn't nice and I'll take it back.

    Now I'm off collecting hazle nuts or Corylus nuts in the Burren, before they fall to the ground and rot and I won't have the chance to enjoy their flavours and benifets.

    I'll be enjoying the company of the nature spirits and entities, such as the Woodwose and other cryptoids in the treelines :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,359 ✭✭✭LessOutragePlz


    Why do you think that?

    I don't think we came into this world I think we came out of it. I think the consciousness we have always existed and it just currently exists inside the body we have. I'd also see our body more as a vessel through which we experience the universe. I'm reminded of this quote:

    "We are not human beings having a spiritual experience; we are spiritual beings having a human experience." - Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

    I have been listening to, reading and watching a bit of Alan Watts, Eckhart Tolle and Mooji so they have influenced my perception of life and how I see things but I've always been questioning life and our existence and some of what they've said has resonated with me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,039 ✭✭✭✭El_Duderino 09


    I don't think we came into this world I think we came out of it. I think the consciousness we have always existed and it just currently exists inside the body we have. I'd also see our body more as a vessel through which we experience the universe. I'm reminded of this quote:

    "We are not human beings having a spiritual experience; we are spiritual beings having a human experience." - Pierre Teilhard de Chardin...

    OK. But it judut leads to the same question... Why do you believe that?

    I suppose what I'm asking is whether you have any evidence to think these things are true or are they just wishful thinking?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 130 ✭✭inthenip


    I think they'll be able to transfer our consciousness to a computer and we all live in a world like the Matrix.

    Wouldn't be too bad.

    Or else be able to clone us where our thoughts can be transferred.

    Surely scientists are working on something that stops the aging process.

    I don't want to die and the thoughts of it frightens the jaysus out of me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,867 ✭✭✭CoBo55


    pauldla wrote: »
    Louis C.K.: Lots of things happen after you die, it's just none of them involve you.

    The funeral does (involve the dead person)


  • Registered Users Posts: 51,652 ✭✭✭✭tayto lover


    Can I take my free travel pass with me just in case?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,359 ✭✭✭LessOutragePlz


    OK. But it judut leads to the same question... Why do you believe that?

    I suppose what I'm asking is whether you have any evidence to think these things are true or are they just wishful thinking?

    Why does anyone believe anything? Because they think there's a possibility that it may be true and I'm the same I believe it maybe true which is why I believe it.

    I can't provide you any evidence to prove that it is true but, that's nothing new as no-one has been able to prove when or how our consciousness was created or when it ends.

    I see it as one of the mysteries of life that won't be solved so yes you may describe it as "wishful thinking" but I think it's a more plausible explanation than we just die and that's it.

    Fairly certain no-one can prove the theory that our consciousness ends when our body dies as we've no proof of that either.

    So it's anyone's guess and we are all speculating as to what happens when "we" die.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭John Hutton


    I think some people have a great misunderstanding of "faith". They just don't "get it".



    Some atheists dismiss religious belief as simple fantasy, something nice to think of like Santa, tooth fairy etc. ("How could you be so stupid/naive etc")



    Whereas for a lot of people with "faith" it is often based on personal religious experiences - transcendent moments of profundity, emotion, peace, security, grace etc. Much of religious belief is based on this personal "evidence", "faith" is not just "I think x".



    All of which is far and away above the fuzzy feeling you have as a child regarding Santa.


    It is important to note that "everlasting life" and a belief in a God, while it can (and is) be a comfort it can be scary too - while the idea of a perfect Judge dishing out perfect justice is comforting, it's worrying too, given that we are all sinners.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,338 ✭✭✭nozzferrahhtoo


    Dr. Bre wrote: »
    Best to ask people with near death experiences

    Why? Would you ask people who visit Dublin Airport what it is like to have a sunny holiday in Spain?
    inthenip wrote: »
    I think they'll be able to transfer our consciousness to a computer and we all live in a world like the Matrix.

    Wouldn't be too bad.

    Suppose it depends which world they put you in. There is an Ian Banks book on exactly that very thing which might make you rethink things a bit :)
    nthclare wrote: »
    Now I'm off collecting hazle nuts or Corylus nuts in the Burren, before they fall to the ground and rot and I won't have the chance to enjoy their flavours and benifets.

    Funny that, I was just about to hit the road to the hills behind my house to raid all the Quince Trees :) Might be a bit early in the year though but I like to scope the trees out at least before everyone else in the town here does.
    nthclare wrote: »
    I'll be enjoying the company of the nature spirits and entities, such as the Woodwose and other cryptoids in the treelines :)

    Healthy imagination you have there. That or its the mushrooms not the nuts you have been eating?


  • Advertisement
  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,316 ✭✭✭nthclare


    Why? Would you ask people who visit Dublin Airport what it is like to have a sunny holiday in Spain?



    Funny that, I was just about to hit the road to the hills behind my house to raid all the Quince Trees :) Might be a bit early in the year though but I like to scope the trees out at least before everyone else in the town here does.



    Healthy imagination you have there. That or its the mushrooms not the nuts you have been eating?

    Lol nature's bounty in my very own county.

    Quince trees, they flowerd late this year in Clare and will be late ripening here.

    My favourite is the medlar fruit, some people call it the open arse fruit lol

    The Burren is full of Hazelwood and hardly any body goes out collecting them..

    I hope it's not as wet there s it is here...


Advertisement