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Advice on buying clubs

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,683 ✭✭✭dan_ep82


    Dinarius wrote: »
    I think I know what you mean by lower swing weight. But, how does that play out with a beginner like me?


    Thanks.

    D.

    In the beginning of learning to play it more than likely won't make a difference. It can effect swing speed, timing and probably fatigue if the differences are big enough.

    I'd prefer to have a shaft too light rather than too heavy but everyone is different.


  • Registered Users Posts: 396 ✭✭bmay529


    I'm sorry this is untrue, there is no way you see the difference between one degree lie angle change in a divot. The club has interacted with the ball before the divot and this interaction changes the trajectory of the club into the ground, so there's a number of things going on.



    Yes the ball flight will change with changing the lie angle, but no way will you notice a change in the divot

    It is quite easy to tell the difference between a flat divot (ideal) and one that favors toe or heel but I could not tell the degree. For that a fitter will put tape on the sole of an iron or use a strike board to test strike and define optimum lie angle suited to the individuals swing. Even 1* (degree) can make a difference. Generally the taller the person the more upright lie angle should be and the shorter the person the flatter the lie angle. I seem to remember reading somewhere that the standard lie angle for irons is usually set to suit an average height of 5'10" (open to correction) for men.


  • Registered Users Posts: 742 ✭✭✭ShivasIrons


    bmay529 wrote: »
    It is quite easy to tell the difference between a flat divot (ideal) and one that favors toe or heel but I could not tell the degree. For that a fitter will put tape on the sole of an iron or use a strike board to test strike and define optimum lie angle suited to the individuals swing. Even 1* (degree) can make a difference. Generally the taller the person the more upright lie angle should be and the shorter the person the flatter the lie angle. I seem to remember reading somewhere that the standard lie angle for irons is usually set to suit an average height of 5'10" (open to correction) for men.


    I'm sorry you are wrong you can't tell from a divot about what lie angle some one should have, because of how the club head changes on impact with the ball.


    The lie board can indicate a starting point on lie angle but again its above the level of the ground so it doesn't indicate exactly what it should be.



    It's not just 1 degree that can make a difference but 0.5 of a degree too


  • Registered Users Posts: 396 ✭✭bmay529


    I'm sorry you are wrong you can't tell from a divot about what lie angle some one should have, because of how the club head changes on impact with the ball.


    The lie board can indicate a starting point on lie angle but again its above the level of the ground so it doesn't indicate exactly what it should be.



    It's not just 1 degree that can make a difference but 0.5 of a degree too

    Let us agree to disagree. I can quite clearly tell from the divot on a flat lie on turf if the toe or heal is digging into the ground and thereby deduce if repeated often that a more upright or flatter iron lie angle would provide a better strike. An experienced fitter will use a strike board or tape to judge the required lie adjustment. There are other factors that can influence the divot profile. Loft/Lie can be adjusted on most irons as sometime they can be knocked out of line through use especially with forged irons.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭Dinarius


    Still considering....

    I think I will go for graphite rather than steel shafts.

    The mixed bag I have now has graphite 5/7 and 3 wood. I definitely hit the ball with greater accuracy with these than I do with the rest.

    The set of Big Bertha 2004 are graphite. But, the grips are well worn. I might hold out for newer clubs and pay a bit more. The BB 2004 are €200 for 5 to SW.

    Thanks.

    D.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 387 ✭✭Skyfloater


    I would suggest that you factor in the price of a new set of grips, certainly for negotiation purposes. No point in getting replacement clubs only to have to use a vice like grip to hold on to them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,486 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    Skyfloater wrote: »
    I would suggest that you factor in the price of a new set of grips, certainly for negotiation purposes. No point in getting replacement clubs only to have to use a vice like grip to hold on to them.

    I know a man :/


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,683 ✭✭✭dan_ep82


    Dinarius wrote: »
    Still considering....

    I think I will go for graphite rather than steel shafts.

    The mixed bag I have now has graphite 5/7 and 3 wood. I definitely hit the ball with greater accuracy with these than I do with the rest.

    The set of Big Bertha 2004 are graphite. But, the grips are well worn. I might hold out for newer clubs and pay a bit more. The BB 2004 are €200 for 5 to SW.

    Thanks.

    D.

    I would say 200 is on the high side with poor grips. For 8 clubs it's not bad if they had good grips.


  • Registered Users Posts: 742 ✭✭✭ShivasIrons


    bmay529 wrote: »
    Let us agree to disagree. I can quite clearly tell from the divot on a flat lie on turf if the toe or heal is digging into the ground and thereby deduce if repeated often that a more upright or flatter iron lie angle would provide a better strike. An experienced fitter will use a strike board or tape to judge the required lie adjustment. There are other factors that can influence the divot profile. Loft/Lie can be adjusted on most irons as sometime they can be knocked out of line through use especially with forged irons.


    I'll go through this one more time, when the club hits the ball on contact it's trajectory through the turf is changed, hence why looking at divots is useless. The position of the lie angle of the club is different pre impact and at impact then it is after impact when the divot is taken.


    It's not a question of agreeing or disagreeing, you're wrong.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭Dinarius


    In the end I bought a set of Ping G irons and a trolley from Golf Market, a bag from Halpenny and a driver and putter from Golf Studio.

    Very pleased.

    Thanks to all for the advice.

    D.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,089 ✭✭✭Happy4all


    Dinarius wrote: »
    In the end I bought a set of Ping G irons and a trolley from Golf Market, a bag from Halpenny and a driver and putter from Golf Studio.

    Very pleased.

    Thanks to all for the advice.

    D.

    I'm tempted to try Golf studio. But prices not greatly down on prices to buy new. Is there any leeway on marked prices?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭Dinarius


    I disagree that prices in GS are comparable to new. Nothing close in my opinion. But, I guess it depends on what you’re looking at.

    I bought a Ping Karsten putter there last week. It is, quite literally, like new. It came with a mint, matching head cover and it cost me €90. Bargain.

    D.

    Ps. I’m self-employed, so I never, ever pay the asking price. It’s second nature to me to haggle. ;)


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