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Advice on buying clubs

  • 02-07-2020 5:23pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    I’m 60.

    I’ve been playing for one year - cajoled into it by a friend who retired last year - and I’m hooked.

    When I started last year, I bought a set of clubs and a bag (probably older than me!) on Adverts for under €100. A neighbour lent me a couple of clubs also.

    For my 60th I’d now like to treat myself to a set that will see use for some years to come.

    I’ve seen sets in shops in the €300-400 range, including bag. Are these worth it? Or would I be better off buying a set of irons and adding what I want to these. (Probably, three wood, rescue club and putter - driver is still a bit beyond me, ability-wise.)

    I’m happy to spend more. Max budget would be €800.

    Or should I buy better secondhand irons on Adverts (just looking at a set of Ping) and add the woods and putter to these?

    And advice appreciated, PM or here on the board.

    Many thanks.

    D.


«1

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 296 ✭✭ Golf is my Game


    You are on the right track there, used is defo the way to go with golf clubs. Their way over priced when new and not at all worth the money as they bring out new ones all the time but really there is no difference year to year. But the good thing about that is that very quickly they are only worth a fraction of what the first lad paid for them so effectively you can get a really decent set for little money. All the clubs are the same too really, but I like a set that looks clean and neat without dings or dirt or missing paint if their that type, but otherwise not fussed about the brand really or the models which are just marketing to gouge more money out of them who has it to spare. Worth going with a set of irons alone which you will pick up pretty handy as they tend to be sold like that rather than by the bag with woods and putter and what have you. Then you pickup some good looking woods or hybrids and putter to whatever catches your eye. The expensive ones are no better as such than the cheap ones, really thats just sales stuff where they have to have different model at different levels because that what people expect, when really the only upgrading an 'upgraded' shaft does is upgrade profits of the club company. Theres great value to be had actually, so worth taking advantage if youd like a nice shiney newish set, as long as you arent expecting them to make any difference to your game then you wont be disappointed and will enjoy them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    Thanks! :)

    Been reading a bit more and consensus seems to be that people should try lots of different clubs,because some will feel right and some won’t. Advice was find longer irons that suit you coz they’re harder than the short irons.

    I think I’ll go to a shop and try out lots of second-hand clubs and see what I like.

    5 to PW, I’m reasonably ok. 3 & 4 iron, I’m poor. I can see why fairway woods exist. I’ve never owned one.

    So, if I find 5/6/7 that I like, I’ll buy a set and add the longer clubs.

    To be honest, I like the idea of quality used clubs, rather than average new ones.

    Thanks again.

    D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,088 ✭✭✭ tritriagain


    Dinarius wrote: »
    Thanks! :)

    Been reading a bit more and consensus seems to be that people should try lots of different clubs,because some will feel right and some won’t. Advice was find longer irons that suit you coz they’re harder than the short irons.

    I think I’ll go to a shop and try out lots of second-hand clubs and see what I like.

    5 to PW, I’m reasonably ok. 3 & 4 iron, I’m poor. I can see why fairway woods exist. I’ve never owned one.

    So, if I find 5/6/7 that I like, I’ll buy a set and add the longer clubs.

    To be honest, I like the idea of quality used clubs, rather than average new ones.

    Thanks again.

    D.

    Try a hybrid to replace long irons. I was old school using long irons until I borrowed a hybrid the brother doesn't use. He's not getting it back. Straight as a dye and very easy to hit. Definitely worth trying.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,001 ✭✭✭ finglashoop


    Not sure where your located but ive bought my clubs and wedges in golf studio celbridge. Brother done the same
    Driving range on site where they let you try clubs out which was the persuader for me.

    I couldnt recommend them enough to be honest and will be going back as im in need of driver wood hybrid upgrade soon


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ dan_ep82


    Not sure where your located but ive bought my clubs and wedges in golf studio celbridge. Brother done the same
    Driving range on site where they let you try clubs out which was the persuader for me.

    I couldnt recommend them enough to be honest and will be going back as im in need of driver wood hybrid upgrade soon


    Derek has a trackman aswell which can speed things up a bit.


    For second hand clubs on site there is no where with as much stock as far as I know.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 718 ✭✭✭ ShivasIrons


    Don’t buy clubs or get advice from anyone who has never seen you hit a shot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    Try a hybrid to replace long irons. I was old school using long irons until I borrowed a hybrid the brother doesn't use. He's not getting it back. Straight as a dye and very easy to hit. Definitely worth trying.

    The guy I play with uses a rescue club? Hits it sweetly almost every time. I struggle with 4 and 3 irons. Am ok with the 5, but it’s a more modern club. Very different looking head.

    What’s the difference between hybrid/rescue/fairway wood?

    Thanks.

    D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    Not sure where your located but ive bought my clubs and wedges in golf studio celbridge. Brother done the same
    Driving range on site where they let you try clubs out which was the persuader for me.

    I couldnt recommend them enough to be honest and will be going back as im in need of driver wood hybrid upgrade soon

    Thanks. Not too far from me.

    Might give them a go.

    D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,088 ✭✭✭ tritriagain


    Dinarius wrote: »
    The guy I play with uses a rescue club? Hits it sweetly almost every time. I struggle with 4 and 3 irons. Am ok with the 5, but it’s a more modern club. Very different looking head.

    What’s the difference between hybrid/rescue/fairway wood?

    Thanks.

    D.
    Hybrid and rescue are the same. They are easier to get the ball up in the air than fairway woods. Easier play out if the rough etc. Worth trying out. Fella in our club uses hybrids from 7 down.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    Hybrid and rescue are the same. They are easier to get the ball up in the air than fairway woods. Easier play out if the rough etc. Worth trying out. Fella in our club uses hybrids from 7 down.

    Thanks.

    I’d probably buy a hybrid equivalent of the 3/4. I like using the 5 iron.

    D.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,088 ✭✭✭ tritriagain


    If you're not going to be professionally fitted there is really no point buying new clubs. Go to somewhere like golf studio and try them out and see what suits your eye.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 296 ✭✭ Golf is my Game


    Hybrids/Rescues are deadly and way better than trying a 3 or 4 iron, so they can be ditched from the bag. They won't be as long as a 5 would though fill the gap between that and a 5 iron well. Wouldn't bother with fitting as while it can be a bit of crack like a demo day and a chance to talk lots of golf gear horse**** which is fun enough if you want, it won't make any difference to your game. A pro will never send you away saying the clubs you have are the best for you so don't buy new ones. He wants to sell stuff. But hybrids, definitely get the. A20 or 21 degree and a 2324 degree or so. Remember that new clubs are like repainting the house. They won't make you play any better buts nice to have done.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    Hybrids/Rescues are deadly and way better than trying a 3 or 4 iron, so they can be ditched from the bag. They won't be as long as a 5 would though fill the gap between that and a 5 iron well. Wouldn't bother with fitting as while it can be a bit of crack like a demo day and a chance to talk lots of golf gear horse**** which is fun enough if you want, it won't make any difference to your game. A pro will never send you away saying the clubs you have are the best for you so don't buy new ones. He wants to sell stuff. But hybrids, definitely get the. A20 or 21 degree and a 2324 degree or so. Remember that new clubs are like repainting the house. They won't make you play any better buts nice to have done.

    Thanks.

    As I wrote in my original post, I have a mixed bag because of what I bought and what my neighbour gave me. He gave me 5,7,PW,SW. They are all more modern looking - chunky heads - and I am more consistent with them. The clubs I bought are probably ancient. Very thin heads. Am ok with 8/9, but poor with 3/4.

    Will try and find 5/6 I like and buy a set - secondhand, preferably. Then add hybrids and other clubs.
    Thanks again.

    D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 411 ✭✭ golfguy1


    Hybrids/Rescues are deadly and way better than trying a 3 or 4 iron, so they can be ditched from the bag. They won't be as long as a 5 would though fill the gap between that and a 5 iron well. Wouldn't bother with fitting as while it can be a bit of crack like a demo day and a chance to talk lots of golf gear horse**** which is fun enough if you want, it won't make any difference to your game. A pro will never send you away saying the clubs you have are the best for you so don't buy new ones. He wants to sell stuff. But hybrids, definitely get the. A20 or 21 degree and a 2324 degree or so. Remember that new clubs are like repainting the house. They won't make you play any better buts nice to have done.

    What a load of thrash you have just posted there.
    Correctly fitted clubs will help every golfer to maximise their ability/potential.
    A lot of pros/fitters don't push sales if ur current equipment is working.
    Demo days are a brilliant way to try some of the current products.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,859 ✭✭✭✭ callaway92


    golfguy1 wrote: »
    What a load of thrash you have just posted there.
    Correctly fitted clubs will help every golfer to maximise their ability/potential.
    A lot of pros/fitters don't push sales if ur current equipment is working.
    Demo days are a brilliant way to try some of the current products.

    Stop - My head was spinning. Somebody wanting a fitting is already in the market for new clubs anyway, so his point was kinda moot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,513 ✭✭✭ Luckycharm


    golfguy1 wrote: »
    What a load of thrash you have just posted there.
    Correctly fitted clubs will help every golfer to maximise their ability/potential.
    A lot of pros/fitters don't push sales if ur current equipment is working.
    Demo days are a brilliant way to try some of the current products.

    Definetly depends on the pro shop, I find halpenny Lucan very good.
    I have a cheap 15 year old 19 degree recovery which I hit fine so went in to try the latest and greatest thinking they are going to be much better. Tried them all they were OK then said will hit my old one a few times to see how it measured up. Of course 3 down the middle 10 yds further than new clubs :p
    I did end up getting a new 22 degree as wanted something that would get up in the air a bit quicker and higher.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    I am considering upgrading my irons, so if I do I'd have a set of Callaway X Hot irons for sale SW-5 iron.

    I'd sell them at a decent price if you're interested. I've come down from 22 to 18 using these irons and they are very forgiving.

    To be honest, I'd agree that a set of second clubs is the only way to go for a beginner, but you def want to have a set, rather than a mix of clubs in order to get a good feel and consistency to your shots.

    Cheers,

    Joey


  • Registered Users Posts: 380 ✭✭ bmay529


    Few thoughts:
    1. Look at irons and woods and see what models you like the look of. Some clubs are much more forgiving and easier to use than others. Ping in my view is possibly the most forgiving "quality" brand. While I don't personally like the chunky style of many of their clubs there is no denying they are very forgiving... I use a Ping Driver and Lob wedge.
    2. Do a bit of research online as I am sure you have
    3. I would go to Derek in the Golf Studio, look at the range he has (remember clubs come in and out of stock all the time) and ask him to advise you and fit you even if you have to pay for it. I would also go for a fitting in a shop and listen to what is suggested in terms of shaft length/lie. Compare the outcome(s) to ensure you are getting the right advice.
    3. People vary in height and physique so the length of shaft and the lie angle etc are important if you want to make proper contact with the ball esp with a full swing and esp if you are other than normal height. For example I am 6' 1" and my pro sold me shafts in my irons 1/2" longer and 1* upright (without fitting). I played them quite well but noticed the toe of the club would regularly dig into the ground on a full swing. When getting a new set a few years ago I went for a fitting and was recommended shaft 1/2" longer and 2* upright... result.. no more toe dig. Fitting can be well worth it. Shafts can be extended but best to look for used irons the right length. Lie can be changed easily by a pro with the right gear (Derek in Golf Studio can do it).
    4. Shafts vary in stiffness and it is good to choose the right one dependent on your normal swing speed.
    5. Forget a 4/3 iron and stick a 21* hybrid in your bag
    6. If you know the model and spec of the clubs you want you can buy excellent used clubs virtually as new online at golfbidder.co.uk delivered in a matter of a day or two for a cost of £10 (I think)
    7. Invest in and do a deal with a Pro for a few lessons

    Happy hunting


  • Registered Users Posts: 993 ✭✭✭ Ryder


    Similar enough to yourself OP 2 years ago. Had gotten a starter set and then wanted to upgrade after a year. Driving was shocking then so just got fitted for irons.

    Honestly didn't make any huge difference to my game at the start but the benefit was having the right style and length clubs for me, that I woukd have for years so would be used to them and not have the variability of changing clubs affecting me. Having nice clubs is a confidence boost and at least you can't blame equipment.

    With your budget you can get a set of irons and then woods later on when you're hitting the ones you have well

    Also have been fitted for clubs in American golf, halfpenny and mcguirks and never felt I was being oversold


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    Went to Celbridge and Halpenny today.

    Setup in Celbridge is great. Hit 90 balls with five different 5 irons. (A handful with PW and hybrid too.)

    Lots of secondhand sets of irons in Celbridge.

    Liked a set of Big Bertha irons. The set even had a 10 iron. Never seen one before. Its 5 iron was the one I liked the most.

    Will return next week.

    Thanks for the advice.

    D.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 380 ✭✭ bmay529


    Dinarius wrote: »
    Liked a set of Big Bertha irons. The set even had a 10 iron. Never seen one before. Its 5 iron was the one I liked the most.

    D.

    Big Bertha irons are a good choice, even older X14 models I used when playing off 7 h/c were super forgiving and I would happily still use.

    I am not sure but I think the 10 iron must be the pitching wedge. See if you can also pick up a matching sand wedge and gap wedge. The gap wedge sits between the pitching wedge and sand wedge.

    Modern clubs have stronger lofts than older clubs, ie a modern 7 iron usually now has the loft of an older 6 iron which gives the illusion the 7 iron goes further!!! the same applies throughout a set. Anyhow each club is designed to go a certain distance and it is a good idea to have a club that covers each distance. Modern 9 irons are about 40* loft, Pitching wedges about 45/46* and a sand wedge about 56* so a big gap between the Pitching wedge and sand wedge which the Gap wedge at about 50* is designed to fill.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ dan_ep82


    Those irons are strong enough in loft


    2tYKWtF.png


    More to it than loft though, if swing speed is low enough stronger lofts are not your friend.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    dan_ep82 wrote: »
    Those irons are strong enough in loft


    2tYKWtF.png


    More to it than loft though, if swing speed is low enough stronger lofts are not your friend.

    Yes, it was the 2004 I was looking at.

    Is it possible they had graphite shafts? I can’t remember now.

    Thanks.

    D.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 296 ✭✭ Golf is my Game


    Ryder wrote: »
    Honestly didn't make any huge difference to my game at the start but the benefit was having the right style and length clubs for me, that I woukd have for years so would be used to them and not have the variability of changing clubs affecting me. Having nice clubs is a confidence boost and at least you can't blame equipment.

    Thats the thing all right. Clubs are a style thing so the bottom line is if you like the look of them, theyre probably the right clubs for you. Theres no real right or wrong in it even though theres all the adds in the magazines and on TV. And probably a good thing not to change to often either because you get to know your length with each club with a set which while not a good are a bad thing that another set hits them longer or shorter, its that you get used to the length you hit them. And theres no improvement in clubs over recent years so you are lossing nothing by playing the same ones for a long time. No reason the amatuer golfer shouldnt be using his same clubs for 10 years or more. Get the grips changed in them every few years is nice, and thats another thing to look at when buy a second hand set, have a look at the grips to see are they cracked or worn in some parts. You should be able to find a set that have good condition ones or if you really want the sticks then get a new set of grips on them and your good to go with a nice new feel to them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ dan_ep82


    Dinarius wrote: »
    Yes, it was the 2004 I was looking at.

    Is it possible they had graphite shafts? I can’t remember now.

    Thanks.

    D.


    Yep, says they come in graphite also with a lower swing weight being the only difference.



    They should be great value at this stage being a few years old although I would check the grips. Fresh grips can change the club (for the better)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,431 ✭✭✭ valoren


    For someone taking up Golf, the 2004 Big Berthas are a great choice. Extremely forgiving which as a beginner is paramount. Gets the ball into the air easily and price should not be prohibitive. Those with lessons for basic fundamentals and you're set. I think as a beginner your prerogative will be honing a dependable repeating swing, the Big Bertha will serve that purpose. In terms of Driver then the G30 is a great, forgiving driver and again cost is more than acceptable given that its 6 years since its release. If you could stretch it to circa 250 euro for a driver then the G400 Max is very user friendly.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,248 ✭✭✭ Dinarius


    dan_ep82 wrote: »
    Yep, says they come in graphite also with a lower swing weight being the only difference.



    They should be great value at this stage being a few years old although I would check the grips. Fresh grips can change the club (for the better)


    I think I know what you mean by lower swing weight. But, how does that play out with a beginner like me?


    Thanks.

    D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 380 ✭✭ bmay529


    Dinarius wrote: »
    I think I know what you mean by lower swing weight. But, how does that play out with a beginner like me?

    Should not be a problem. I used graphite shafts in my irons since my mid 20's and liked the soft feel very much. Are the shafts Regular or Stiff flex? I used a Firm flex that used to be available and was sort of between stiff and regular. Ask the Pro to look at your swing as he should be able to advise you which is best for you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 718 ✭✭✭ ShivasIrons


    Thats the thing all right. Clubs are a style thing so the bottom line is if you like the look of them, theyre probably the right clubs for you. Theres no real right or wrong in it even though theres all the adds in the magazines and on TV.


    I'm sorry but this is a load of rubbish. The 18 handicapper should play blades because they look good to them?


    There is a reason why there is multiple models in all manufacturers lines, they all perform differently. So yes there is right and wrong


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  • Registered Users Posts: 718 ✭✭✭ ShivasIrons


    bmay529 wrote: »
    Few thoughts:

    For example I am 6' 1" and my pro sold me shafts in my irons 1/2" longer and 1* upright (without fitting). I played them quite well but noticed the toe of the club would regularly dig into the ground on a full swing. When getting a new set a few years ago I went for a fitting and was recommended shaft 1/2" longer and 2* upright... result.. no more toe dig.




    I'm sorry this is untrue, there is no way you see the difference between one degree lie angle change in a divot. The club has interacted with the ball before the divot and this interaction changes the trajectory of the club into the ground, so there's a number of things going on.



    Yes the ball flight will change with changing the lie angle, but no way will you notice a change in the divot


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