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Are Adjustable Combs For Shotguns Worth it?

  • 20-05-2020 10:40am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 171 ✭✭ cosieman


    Are Adjustable combs for sporting clays worth the extra price?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 473 ✭✭ The pigeon man


    cosieman wrote: »
    Are Adjustable combs for sporting clays worth the extra price?

    It the shotgun fits perfectly without an adjustable comb you don't need it.

    But in the likely event that you need to make minor adjustments to make it fit you it's worth every penny.

    Pat sluds is the man to do them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    I don't see the point of them on shotguns, as the pigeon man said, if the gun fits it doesn't need an adjustment. But they would be good on rifles, where if you change the scope, or revert to open sights, you may need to move the comb.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,540 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    Have you ever done a pattern test with the shotgun?

    If not then i'd suggest that as a first step. If you have then it'll show you if you're natural hold is suitable to the gun or not.

    What i mean by that is when i shoot a Beretta i'm straight down the rib. I only see the front sight and i must aim with the target just on or slightly above the sight.

    When i shoot with a Bettinsoli i must be able to look "down along" the rib, meaning i need to see a slight amount of the rib and the front sight/muzzle of the gun must block out the target.

    The reasons for the difference is because of my cheek position. So in order to compensate for my cheek position, which is my natural hold of the gun, i aim higher with one make over the other. This could be because Beretta make their stocks a little "higher" than Bettinsoli.

    Now if i shoot a Winchester or Browning shotgun i notice in the majority of cases i'm in the same position as either the Beretta or Bettinsoli, but with the added complication of being to the side of the gun. In other words i'm either right down the rib with a Browning (like with a Beretta) but i'm also looking along the side of the rib. So i'd either be behind or in front of hte target. I have to move my head to an "unnatural" hold position to compensate.

    With the couple of Winchester guns i've tried i have to look up along the rib like the Bettinsoli, but am still out to the side of the gun as with the Browning. So again i'm not only to be low by in front or behind the target.

    Its why when i go looking for a gun i shoulder it with my eyes shut and get the gun into my natural shooting/shouldered position and then open my eyes to see where i'm aiming.

    A pattern test will tell you what you need to know quite quickly. Stick up a sheet of paper or piece of cardboard at least two foot square. Draw a large aiming dot in the centre (about an inch or two). Aim the shotgun, without adjusting your hold, at the dot and fire a single shot. Take note if you're looking along the rib, or if you can only see the front sight. See how the shot patterns around the dot.

    If the majority of your shot is above or below the aiming dot then the gun is not sitting correctly. Now you can either learn to adjust your hold, change the gun or depending on whether you need to increase your cheek weld or not, can fit a cheek riser/comb and this will correct the problem. The same thing applies if the pattern is to the left or right of the centre dot.

    The other aspect of pattern testing is don't just use one choke, with one brand of cartridge at one distance. Try as many chokes with as many cartridges at various distances to give yourself the best possible report of how the gun fires. It also gives you good info on which combo of choke/cartridge works best at what distance.

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  • Registered Users Posts: 850 ✭✭✭ zeissman


    As others have said if the gun fits you it is not needed but I had one on my last clay gun and if I was buying another I would have it as well.
    Very few guns will fit perfectly so if you have an adjustable comb you can set it your requirements.
    Once your happy with it leave it and dont be messing about with it.
    Most shooters prefer a higher comb for DTL and an adjustable comb allows you to use your sporter as a trap gun as well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    zeissman wrote: »
    As others have said if the gun fits you it is not needed but I had one on my last clay gun and if I was buying another I would have it as well.
    Very few guns will fit perfectly so if you have an adjustable comb you can set it your requirements.
    Once your happy with it leave it and dont be messing about with it.
    Most shooters prefer a higher comb for DTL and an adjustable comb allows you to use your sporter as a trap gun as well.

    I have seen lads if they miss a few, doubting the gun, they start messing around with the chokes and i can see the adjustable comb being the same.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 441 ✭✭ jb88


    tudderone wrote: »
    I have seen lads if they miss a few, doubting the gun, they start messing around with the chokes and i can see the adjustable comb being the same.

    Contact Pat Sludds, he will tell you what you need. The man has helped countless people I know with all types of guns and is in my experience a forgotten gem in this country.
    No 1 shotgun furniture guy.

    His prices are extremely reasonable and it can actually add to the value of a gun when your selling it, or in my case when I bought a gun with his modifications to the stock with a cheak riser and riser bars, I realised immediately that I needed higher riser bars as I had installed a new rail and had medium mounts.


    A trip down to him and a great conversation later, problem fixed for free and an extremely happy customer. His work is perfection countless shotgun guys across the country rely on his work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 121 ✭✭ Steel rain


    What's the cost roughly to get an adjustable comb fitted?


  • Registered Users Posts: 210 ✭✭ bluezulu49


    It's five years since I had Pat do adjustable comb risers on two shotguns and he charged €120 each at the time. One of them allows my son, who is left master eye, to shoot successfully from the left shoulder with a right handed gun.

    My only regret is that I did not get the work done earlier. ( As in 40 years ago.)


  • Registered Users Posts: 171 ✭✭ cosieman


    Pat clinton?


  • Registered Users Posts: 210 ✭✭ bluezulu49


    cosieman wrote: »
    Pat clinton?
    Pat Sludds, Glenbrien, Enniscorthy.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Pat is a terrible nice bloke, i was down with a friend getting a stock done and went along for the spin. Nice work for not much money.


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