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Recommend a running shoe

  • 10-04-2020 9:11am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 452 ✭✭


    Hi All,

    Can you recommend a decent pair of running shoes for road running? Maybe around the €100 to €120 mark? Leaving aside current restrictions, I normally do no more than 6km to 10km. I've always used asics, without putting too much thought in to a particular type.

    In terms of support, i do have slight fallen arches.

    anyway, any recommendations would be great.

    Thanks


«1345

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 11,711 ✭✭✭✭Charlie19


    I had previously wore Asics for years, they were a very sturdy runner, but have changed in the last year to a Nike Presto and I can't recommend enough. It's a very light weight fit but just so comfortable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,508 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    Meursault wrote: »
    Hi All,

    Can you recommend a decent pair of running shoes for road running? Maybe around the €100 to €120 mark? Leaving aside current restrictions, I normally do no more than 6km to 10km. I've always used asics, without putting too much thought in to a particular type.

    In terms of support, i do have slight fallen arches.

    anyway, any recommendations would be great.

    Thanks

    The most important part of a "good" running shoe is comfort..
    So it very hard for anyone to make recommend, as they'll only be suggesting a shoe that feels right to them..
    As for stability over neutral etc, theres no evidence to say one is better than the other at preventing injury.

    You best bet is to got to as many shops as possible and try on a good few pairs and see what feels right for you.
    When current restrictions are lifted of course


  • Registered Users Posts: 452 ✭✭Meursault


    Ceepo wrote: »
    The most important part of a "good" running shoe is comfort..
    So it very hard for anyone to make recommend, as they'll only be suggesting a shoe that feels right to them..
    As for stability over neutral etc, theres no evidence to say one is better than the other at preventing injury.

    You best bet is to got to as many shops as possible and try on a good few pairs and see what feels right for you.
    When current restrictions are lifted of course

    Agree but not possible at the moment, unfortunately. Might just go with Asics again. Served me well enough up to now I guess.

    Thanks again All.


  • Registered Users Posts: 954 ✭✭✭caff


    Meursault wrote: »
    Agree but not possible at the moment, unfortunately. Might just go with Asics again. Served me well enough up to now I guess.

    Thanks again All.

    Used to wear asics until they changed the position of the seam on the instep and caused blisters.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,745 ✭✭✭Swiper the fox


    Meursault wrote: »
    Agree but not possible at the moment, unfortunately. Might just go with Asics again. Served me well enough up to now I guess.

    Thanks again All.

    Try out Saucony guide13, you won’t regret it, light, cushioned and with the support you need, a great shoe


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,508 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    Try out Saucony guide13, you won’t regret it, light, cushioned and with the support you need, a great shoe

    Curious to know what you base the above on?
    Do you think my previous post was acutate ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,745 ✭✭✭Swiper the fox


    Ceepo wrote: »
    Curious to know what you base the above on?
    Do you think my previous post was acutate ?

    Of course, but the luxury of visiting numerous running shops won’t be with us for quite a while, the spec sounded similar to my own and I recommended a show for somebody who probably wants them soon.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,582 ✭✭✭Swashbuckler


    If you like Asics then the Dynaflyte is a great buy. Nice comfortable shoe for easy miles.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    The brand name means nothing. Get shoes that suit you. Do you pronate or or underpronate? Do you need cushioned shoes or stability shoes?.Get yourself checked by a shop that knows what they are doing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,807 ✭✭✭skyblue46


    If you like Asics then the Dynaflyte is a great buy. Nice comfortable shoe for easy miles.


    I've worn them and liked them but Asics have upped their game significantly recently. The Evoride is in a different league to the Dynaflyte....too new to get any reductions or deals on but a super shoe.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    Wise up lads. Wearing someone elses shoes is like taking someone elses medicine.

    If you are serious about your running, find out what suits you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,807 ✭✭✭skyblue46


    First Up wrote: »
    Wise up lads. Wearing someone elses shoes is like taking someone elses medicine.

    If you are serious about your running, find out what suits you.


    I'd agree...but whether they are neutral or support shoes probably wont come into the equation. There is no evidence to back up the idea that there are benefits to choosing one over the other. Try them on, if they feel good then buy them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭bilbot79


    Nike pegasus


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    skyblue46 wrote:
    I'd agree...but whether they are neutral or support shoes probably wont come into the equation. There is no evidence to back up the idea that there are benefits to choosing one over the other. Try them on, if they feel good then buy them.

    What feels good when sitting in the shoe shop? Yeah, that'll set you up for 100+miles a month and a few 20 milers.

    You'll find out eventually.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,807 ✭✭✭skyblue46


    First Up wrote: »
    What feels good when sitting in the shoe shop? Yeah, that'll set you up for 100+miles a month and a few 20 milers.

    You'll find out eventually.


    No, what feels comfortable on a run. Anywhere I buy runners gives me the option to return them after a few runs if they don't suit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,582 ✭✭✭Swashbuckler


    OP ignore the scaremongering. It's well within reason to just try a pair and see how they suit. All the analysis in the world won't make a difference. A lot of myths and hyperbole surrounding pronation and cushioning/support. If you like Asics then it's worth checking out the runners recommended by myself and skyblue. If you start to run into issues then consider digging a little deeper.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    OP ignore the scaremongering. It's well within reason to just try a pair and see how they suit. All the analysis in the world won't make a difference. A lot of myths and hyperbole surrounding pronation and cushioning/support. If you like Asics then it's worth checking out the runners recommended by myself and skyblue. If you start to run into issues then consider digging a little deeper.

    Yes, and I recommend medicine made by Bayer. If it doesn't work you can always go to a doctor or something.

    Asics make shoes that suit your weight, gait, mileage and pocket. So do Adidas, Nike, Brooks, Saucony, New Balance and everyone else. And they all make shoes that don't suit you too.

    If you are serious about your running (and shoes), listen to people who know what they are talking about. Go to a proper shop.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,745 ✭✭✭Swiper the fox


    First Up wrote: »
    Yes, and I recommend medicine made by Bayer. If it doesn't work you can always go to a doctor or something.

    Asics make shoes that suit your weight, gait, mileage and pocket. So do Adidas, Nike, Brooks, Saucony, New Balance and everyone else. And they all make shoes that don't suit you too.

    If you are serious about your running (and shoes), listen to people who know what they are talking about. Go to a proper shop.

    There’s no shops open and this person wants to run now, there’s plenty of safe options going on what the OP has said, your advice is to wait a few months?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,580 ✭✭✭NoviGlitzko


    Are running shops still open though? Maybe the OP wants to get out now and run. Anyway, well done for getting back into the running. Make sure you make full use of your running app.

    My go-to exercising was cycling and I've only started jogging in the past couple of weeks. I bought a pair of Saucony Ride Iso 2 and I'm really happy with them. Lightweight, very comfortable, great on the road, great design, and not too expensive. I'm so happy with the brand that I just bought the Iso 5 Triumph (max cushioning version) but have yet to test them out. I will today!


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    There’s no shops open and this person wants to run now, there’s plenty of safe options going on what the OP has said, your advice is to wait a few months?

    I think he already has Asics. He asked for recommendations for getting a new pair. Spending €100 - €120 merits a bit of research; if he really wants to buy now, then at least look into it online.

    I certainly wouldn't ask here and the responses show why. Recommending brands means nothing; recommending specific shoes without knowing anything about the person who will wear them is irresponsible.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,745 ✭✭✭Swiper the fox


    First Up wrote: »
    I think he already has Asics. He asked for recommendations for getting a new pair. Spending €100 - €120 merits a bit of research; if he really wants to buy now, then at least look into it online.

    I certainly wouldn't ask here and the responses show why. Recommending brands means nothing; recommending specific shoes without knowing anything about the person who will wear them is irresponsible.

    Would you go so far as to say it’s evil?
    Apologies to the OP, I was merely trying to help


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    Would you go so far as to say it’s evil? Apologies to the OP, I was merely trying to help


    Not evil, but if you ask a silly question......


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    First Up wrote: »
    Yes, and I recommend medicine made by Bayer. If it doesn't work you can always go to a doctor or something.

    Asics make shoes that suit your weight, gait, mileage and pocket. So do Adidas, Nike, Brooks, Saucony, New Balance and everyone else. And they all make shoes that don't suit you too.

    If you are serious about your running (and shoes), listen to people who know what they are talking about. Go to a proper shop.

    The medicine comparison is a fallacy as they are not like for like.

    Throughout majority of research done in the area there is actually very little to say that shoes have any major impact on injury prevention. As has been said before comfort has been one of the most reliable guides in terms of shoe choice.

    Some brands will have similar traits from a comfort perspective (toe box fit etc so recommendations on that regard can be useful but other than that a if you are looking from injury risk perspective better of spending time on bio-mechanics and injury prevention rather than relying on the shoes.

    FWIW I always found Brooks heavier shoes tend to have a good bit of Cross over with the Asics so could be worth looking for as pricewise they tend to be a bit more reasonable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    The medicine comparison is perfectly valid. Brands can be of some value as a measure of quality but they are no value whatever as a guide to what shoe is best for you.

    Trying shoes on in a shop (or looking at them online) won't tell you how comfortable they will be for high mileage. Even a superficial analysis of your gait (for example looking at which side of your shoes are most worn down) will show if you pronate, over pronate or supinate and that will point you towards cushioned or stability shoes. The OP mentioned a problem with his arches. That is usually an indicator of over pronation and raises the possibility that he has been wearing the wrong type for his gait.

    He is not going to get that sort of analysis or advice on Boards.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,582 ✭✭✭Swashbuckler


    So in summary, the Evoride, Dynaflyte or Pegasus. Happy days.


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    First Up wrote: »
    The medicine comparison is perfectly valid. Brands can be of some value as a measure of quality but they are no value whatever as a guide to what shoe is best for you.

    Trying shoes on in a shop (or looking at them online) won't tell you how comfortable they will be for high mileage. Even a superficial analysis of your gait (for example looking at which side of your shoes are most worn down) will show if you pronate, over pronate or supinate and that will point you towards cushioned or stability shoes. The OP mentioned a problem with his arches. That is usually an indicator of over pronation and raises the possibility that he has been wearing the wrong type for his gait.

    He is not going to get that sort of analysis or advice on Boards.

    They might tell you your type of gait but they give absolutely no indication of why your gait is as such.

    Take excessive over-pronation for example and the arches as mentioned, trunk instability, short tight piriformis muscles, tight posterior tibialis and a host of other imbalances in muscles along the kinetic chain will have a bearing on this. A shoe won't combat this in any shape or form it simply kicks the can down the road through compensation (normally affecting another area on the kinetic chain)

    There is no wrong type (this is the myth) as long as the muscles are conditioned correctly they will adapt to a gait change. It's a sudden change to what the person (and there muscles) are used to that creates over-use issues (this is where I agree with your statement taht he won't get this sort of Analysis on boards or online in general). This is why comfort and not the "right type" is important despite the many marketing claims that are made


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 873 ✭✭✭Casey78


    So in summary, the Evoride, Dynaflyte or Pegasus. Happy days.

    Prefer the New Balance Beacon myself :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,822 ✭✭✭✭First Up


    KSU wrote: »
    They might tell you your type of gait but they give absolutely no indication of why your gait is as such.

    Take excessive over-pronation for example and the arches as mentioned, trunk instability, short tight piriformis muscles, tight posterior tibialis and a host of other imbalances in muscles along the kinetic chain will have a bearing on this. A shoe won't combat this in any shape or form it simply kicks the can down the road through compensation (normally affecting another area on the kinetic chain)

    There is no wrong type (this is the myth) as long as the muscles are conditioned correctly they will adapt to a gait change. It's a sudden change to what the person (and there muscles) are used to that creates over-use issues (this is where I agree with your statement taht he won't get this sort of Analysis on boards or online in general). This is why comfort and not the "right type" is important despite the many marketing claims that are made

    The OP can decide for himself if he wants to try to change the gait he was born with. I'm just suggesting that in the meantime, he wear shoes that suit him.

    I've advised him to listen to people who know what they are talking about. He can decide for himself who they are.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 Quay_Inn


    First Up wrote: »
    The OP can decide for himself if he wants to try to change the gait he was born with. I'm just suggesting that in the meantime, he wear shoes that suit him.

    I've advised him to listen to people who know what they are talking about. He can decide for himself who they are.

    Christ you're insufferable. He's deciding on a pair of shoes, not a chemotherapy treatment. The medicine comparison is just ludicrous. There is a consensus about which shoe manufacturers produce decent running shoes, and when given a few options he can make the final decision himself. If he ends up ordering a pair that turns out to be a bad fit, he can easily return them.

    Saying that you cannot advise somebody is not helpful. If you won't help, then leave it to the people who will.

    OP - I suggest a pair of Hoka Clifton 6. They're 20 euro above your budget but are very well regarded in the running community. I've had my pair for over a year and they're holding up well - very comfortable.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    First Up wrote: »
    The OP can decide for himself if he wants to try to change the gait he was born with. I'm just suggesting that in the meantime, he wear shoes that suit him.

    Your gait is not pre-determined though, it's in a state of flux just think of how many times a minute your muscles will go through contraction cycle and all the variables such as hydration, fatigue, mineral content will affect each muscle fibre and how this affects muscle recruitment and in turn how muscles act and react with each other.

    Strong, healthy muscles will be able to deal with change and the point is that building up this foundation is more important than the shoes you run in outside of what feels natural to you (which is not a pre determined state)


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