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Cycle Lane on Talbot Memorial Bridge

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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    forumlover wrote: »
    How? There's enough cycle lanes in the city as it is, & half the time they just use the roads anyway.

    I guess you don't cycle so? There are only a handful of short stretches of cycle lane in Dublin City centre, there are some painted on ones that act as free parking for cars.


  • Registered Users Posts: 40 forumlover


    cgcsb wrote: »
    I guess you don't cycle so? There are only a handful of short stretches of cycle lane in Dublin City centre, there are some painted on ones that act as free parking for cars.

    Used to. Now I mostly drive. Too far to cycle to work & requires 2 or more buses to get there as no direct bus route.
    Fortunately it's not in the City.
    Although once there, trips to & from the city are a regular occurrence.
    Over the past 20 years, I've noticed congestion in the city has become increasingly worse due to several reasons.
    Cycling infrastructure is just the latest one.
    When I used to cycle into the city, there were no cycle lanes & i survived. Now they're everywhere. Dublin's gone cycling mad.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    forumlover wrote: »
    Dublin's gone cycling mad.

    Isn't it great, the vast majority of commutes into the canals are by sustainable mode. Long may this trend continue. The CBC project will hand even more road space over from cars to sustainable modes and greater reduce the rate of car commuting. Can't wait.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 48,299 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    forumlover wrote: »
    Over the past 20 years, I've noticed congestion in the city has become increasingly worse due to several reasons.
    between 2006 and 2018, the number of private cars passing the canal cordon dropped by nearly 10,000 (from just over 58.5k in 2006 to just under 49k in 2018); but the increase in cycling and walking combined has jumped by a greater margin.

    https://www.nationaltransport.ie/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Canal_Cordon_Report_2018.pdf


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,736 ✭✭✭✭loyatemu


    Dublin has some of the worst traffic in the world. The only way to improve that is to reduce the number of cars - for every person who claims they have to into drive into the city centre because the public transport options aren't practical, there's probably 3 more who could get the bus, or cycle but don't because they prefer to drive.

    People don't cycle because they don't think it's safe, and they don't get the bus because it's unreliable. Making cycling safer and buses reliable involves giving them more space and taking that space away from cars.

    You'll still be able to drive into the city, you'll just have fewer lanes dedicated to private cars (or maybe you'll have to pay if they bring in congestion charging). This process is only going in one direction, even if DCC aren't exactly gung-ho about it.
    I see a lot more private cars carrying passengers than any cyclists carrying them

    the average number of people in a typical rush hour car in Dublin is well under 2. Also all the taxis driving around the city with no passengers are effectively carrying no-one - it's time they were treated as private cars rather than public transport which they are not.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,533 ✭✭✭Beta Ray Bill


    cgcsb wrote: »
    Are you saying we should ban cars outright? I think you're onto something there but I'd limit the area the ban applies to. There isn't a real need for car commuters on Aston Quay or Bachelors walk for example.

    Perhaps you're right. However the long term effects of doing something like that need to be considered.
    The traffic evaporation is just another way of saying people wont use their cars anymore and wont come into town if they can avoid it and instead use public transport as a last resort.

    That being said, many large businesses are moving out of Dublin City Centre, which in fairness is grand as they don't need to be there anymore, AIB is a prime example of this, they are in the process of moving 4,000 staff out of Balsbridge to Leapordstown. Bank Centre will probably be knocked and they'll build apartments. But while that's happening the local business (which a heavily dependent on AIB staff trade will be out of pocket)

    As I said I don't drive and am lucky enough to live on the DART line.
    In fact I don't know anyone that drives into town :confused:

    If I was unfortunate enough to live on crappy bus line, I'd probably not work in town OR work from home 4 days a week! :D
    loyatemu wrote: »
    People don't cycle because they don't think it's safe, and they don't get the bus because it's unreliable. Making cycling safer and buses reliable involves giving them more space and taking that space away from cars.

    There's an overlap there.
    Cycling on wet or windy day is 100% crap! one of the main reasons I stopped.
    You get in/start late cause you're freezing, it's harder to cycle, and you need to dry off etc. Then you've the windy wet cycle home. One is not at all motivated to cycle in such conditions.

    A lot of the bus routes in Dublin are ropey as hell.
    You've a VERY good chance that an overweight, smelly, or weird person will sit beside ya. Or worse still, some skanger/junkie


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    That being said, many large businesses are moving out of Dublin City Centre,

    Well, no actually, the opposite is the case. Employment density in the City Centre is increasing. Dublin postal districts 1,2,4,7 and 8 now account for 95% of current office developments by sqm. with the vast majority of that being in 1 and 2.

    AIB is a solitary example to the contrary. and they're not moving because they want their staff to drive to work. :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,533 ✭✭✭Beta Ray Bill


    cgcsb wrote: »
    Well, no actually, the opposite is the case. Employment density in the City Centre is increasing. Dublin postal districts 1,2,4,7 and 8 now account for 95% of current office developments by sqm. with the vast majority of that being in 1 and 2.

    You can just say the Quays and Large American Multinational Internet company Land.
    cgcsb wrote: »
    AIB is a solitary example to the contrary. and they're not moving because they want their staff to drive to work. :rolleyes:

    Are you joking?
    I used to work in Bank Centre, A massive amount of them drive to work!
    That being said I dont think they have the parking facilities in Leapordstown that have in Bank Centre


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭0lddog


    cgcsb wrote: »
    ........AIB is a solitary example to the contrary. and they're not moving because they want their staff to drive to work. :rolleyes:

    Whats the point here ?

    When the old Bankcentre is built out the office space will be about double what it was. There will be a heap more people there. They will work for Facebook and not AIB - but so what, they still have to get to and from work


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 48,299 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    i suspect i parsed that sentence differently.
    the 'not' applies to the 'because they want their staff to drive to work' - i.e that's not the reason they're moving.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,818 ✭✭✭donvito99


    70% of people manage to get into the city without a car on weekdays, the 30% i.e. motorists are causing carnage.

    It's high time more space was dedicated towards improving the experience for the 70%. Most are paying "road" tax but leaving the car at home.


  • Registered Users Posts: 40 forumlover


    donvito99 wrote: »

    It's high time more space was dedicated towards improving the experience for the 70%. Most are paying "road" tax but leaving the car at home.

    And what percentage use public transport compared to those who cycle. I would say the minority cycle, so you're basically saying it's high time more space was dedicated towards improving the experience for the minority.

    Buses can't use cycle lanes.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 48,299 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    it's quite simple. the reaction to traffic gridlock, caused mostly by cars, is to prioritise efficient modes of transport; and not to dedicate more space to the very cause of the gridlock.


  • Registered Users Posts: 40 forumlover


    it's quite simple. the reaction to traffic gridlock, caused mostly by cars, is to prioritise efficient modes of transport; and not to dedicate more space to the very cause of the gridlock.

    We're heading into Autumn. School runs will be restarting soon = More cars on the road.

    And when the weather turns nasty ie; rain, wind, cold & snow, the bikes will be left at home = More cars on the road.

    They're prioritizing the wrong mode of transport.


  • Registered Users Posts: 40 forumlover


    Plus nobody's asking them to dedicate more space for cars.

    Just don't take it away!


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,891 ✭✭✭✭Stark


    Not really sure what the issue is here. I commute via Talbot Memorial bridge every day and there's been no removal of car traffic lane that I've noticed. They extended the City quay off-road cycle lane back up the bridge a little in their pathetic panic building spree before the Velocity conference but that was at the expense of pedestrian space from what I can see. Still 4 lanes for car traffic.
    forumlover wrote:
    Cycling infrastructure is just the latest one.
    When I used to cycle into the city, there were no cycle lanes & i survived. Now they're everywhere. Dublin's gone cycling mad.

    Try visiting a city like Amsterdam, Copenhagen or Hamburg that has proper infrastructure and then try and come back and say that Dublin is "cycling mad". The infrastructure in Dublin is so bad it's almost criminal.
    Something needs to be done, but what!?
    We can't keep going they way are.

    BTW I used the DART 99% of the time!

    Make the alternatives more attractive for people. I like my car too but I accepted long ago that it's just not realistic to expect that every single person who commutes into Dublin city centre can do so by car and not encounter traffic. And since that leaves the option of bus / bike for me I'd rather that the former be prioritized (luckily my current route has QBC most of the way so is quite efficient, but I've been looking for a new place to live and finding my options limited because of the ****ty routes the buses have to take into town from most places in Dublin) and the latter be safe.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    forumlover wrote: »
    We're heading into Autumn. School runs will be restarting soon = More cars on the road.

    And when the weather turns nasty ie; rain, wind, cold & snow, the bikes will be left at home = More cars on the road.

    They're prioritizing the wrong mode of transport.

    Are you actually serious or are you just trying to be a melter? You're proposing that the city/state should revert to 1960s think and prioritise cars, contrary to the rest of the developed world's knowledge on the matter. Why?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    forumlover wrote: »
    Plus nobody's asking them to dedicate more space for cars.

    Just don't take it away!

    Are you familiar with the laws of physics? The same applies here, road space cannot be created or destroyed merely changed from one form to another.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,533 ✭✭✭Allinall


    forumlover wrote: »
    We're heading into Autumn. School runs will be restarting soon = More cars on the road.

    And when the weather turns nasty ie; rain, wind, cold & snow, the bikes will be left at home = More cars on the road.

    They're prioritizing the wrong mode of transport.

    What’s wrong with school walks?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,818 ✭✭✭donvito99


    cgcsb wrote: »
    Are you actually serious or are you just trying to be a melter? You're proposing that the city/state should revert to 1960s think and prioritise cars, contrary to the rest of the developed world's knowledge on the matter. Why?

    Because he would rather sit in his car for longer, increasing the risk of death and serious injury in the city centre, than sit on a bus and reduce commutes for everybody, as is done everyday by a majority of commuters.

    Fact and reason don't come into it. It's spite in an Octavia.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,896 ✭✭✭✭Spook_ie


    cgcsb wrote: »
    Are you familiar with the laws of physics? The same applies here, road space cannot be created or destroyed merely changed from one form to another.

    Don't think he's referring to destroying road space, just the changing from shared use to exclusive use.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators Posts: 26,399 Mod ✭✭✭✭Peregrine


    forumlover wrote: »
    And what percentage use public transport compared to those who cycle. I would say the minority cycle, so you're basically saying it's high time more space was dedicated towards improving the experience for the minority.

    Buses can't use cycle lanes.

    I'm glad to hear that you're supportive of improving public transport. Most people here are too. See the Core Bus Corridors project. Luckily, it's possible to improve both public transport and cycling infrastructure.

    Since there is limited space is the city (and widening roads has been proven to fail at reducing traffic due to induced demand), the space to improve both public transport and cycling will have to come from the least inefficient user — the private car. It's very simple.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,891 ✭✭✭✭Stark


    Oh but it's not fair. All the space should be for me. It's not "fair" otherwise.

    ** Parents note **: Stark is tired after a long day stuck in traffic in the car and needs his nap now. He'll be allowed talk to you again tomorrow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,217 ✭✭✭howiya


    Does reducing car capacity here have a direct negative impact on public transport in the immediate area? I’m thinking of the buses using Amiens St and Beresford place.

    If it was up to me the place I’d be removing a general traffic lane is the stretch inbound alongside where the bus lane disappears to maintain two general traffic lanes.

    Buses are also occasionally hampered by the location of the Dublin bus stop for the 27 and 151 when the bus lane resumes.

    Buses that don’t cross the bridge will then have to fight through the queuing traffic to get to the right turn at Custom House Quay.

    Just my own observations from using the bus this morning.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    Spook_ie wrote: »
    Don't think he's referring to destroying road space, just the changing from shared use to exclusive use.

    General traffic lanes are not 'shared' try 'sharing' one as a cyclist.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,818 ✭✭✭donvito99


    cgcsb wrote: »
    General traffic lanes are not 'shared' try 'sharing' one as a cyclist.

    Exactly, taxi drivers won't share the Bus lanes but they're more than happy to share the cycle lane, parking all over them


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    I've often been cycling in a 'shared' lane and had a cars and taxis beep at me because they want to go faster, shout things, throw things, bump my back wheel even.

    If you can civilize the population perhaps 'shared' lanes would work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 926 ✭✭✭Utter Consternation


    cgcsb wrote: »
    General traffic lanes are not 'shared' try 'sharing' one as a cyclist.

    I've been beeped at and abused on this bridge in particular by motorists on many, many occasions.

    Some people seem to lose the run of themselves when they get behind the wheel.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    I've been beeped at and abused on this bridge in particular by motorists on many, many occasions.

    Some people seem to lose the run of themselves when they get behind the wheel.

    They feel safe in their little metal box. I've made a few fat boys in Skodas feel very unsafe mind you when they get stuck at a red light.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 926 ✭✭✭Utter Consternation


    cgcsb wrote: »
    They feel safe in their little metal box. I've made a few fat boys in Skodas feel very unsafe mind you when they get stuck at a red light.

    The tune changes when you get face to face with them alright. :D


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