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Cap and ball revolvers

  • 20-07-2019 12:02am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,877 ✭✭✭ minktrapper
    Registered User


    What is the story with acquiring one of theses.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭ archer22
    Registered User


    Same laws as cartridge firearms.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,877 ✭✭✭ minktrapper
    Registered User


    archer22 wrote: »
    Same laws as cartridge firearms.

    Thanks. I would love to own one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭ tac foley
    Registered User


    If you live in the Republic of Ireland, please be aware that they use either the correct grade of LOOSE black powder, or one of the non-Class 1 explosive black powder substitutes - Pyrodex P or Triple 7.

    To obtain either of those in the RoI requires an Explosives licence for the propellant - as above, and also for the percussion caps, which are also explosives. And who knows, maybe, since air-gun pellets are classed as 'live ammunition', an accountable number of suitable balls to shoot.

    Popular calibres for C&B revolvers are .31cal - pocket pistols, the .36cal Navy colt, and numerous .44cal. I've left out single-shot firearms as you've expressed no interest in them - but they are basically flintlock or percussion. Flintlock handguns can be great fun, and of course, you don't need a licence for a lump of rock, unlike percussion caps. Which still leaves you the problem of getting BP of a suitable grade in the RoI.

    I might be wrong, but I don't bleeve there are ANY such provisions in the Republic. I am, however, prepared to be corrected.

    So, basically, if you live in the North, it's easy.

    And if you live in the Republic, it ain't.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 286 ✭✭ oldgit1897


    Thanks. I would love to own one.

    Me too, i'd love a ruger cap and ball revolver, i don't think they make them anymore, but companies like Uberti and Pedersoli certainly do. Sadly muzzleloaders seem to have fallen between two stools and i doubt anything will ever be done about it.


    https://www.uberti-usa.com/black-powder-revolvers


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,555 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass
    Moderator


    archer22 wrote: »
    Same laws as cartridge firearms.

    Not if it's the powder, percussion cap, and ball/bullet type as the components are all individual so as Tac said above it requires separate licensing to own the various components.

    A cartridge firearm, whether restricted or unrestricted, is different as all components are "pre-made" and sold as a unit so you're never, technically, in possession of the individual components.

    Silly, yes. Necessary under Irish law, also yes.

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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭ archer22
    Registered User


    Cass wrote: »
    Not if it's the powder, percussion cap, and ball/bullet type as the components are all individual so as Tac said above it requires separate licensing to own the various components.

    A cartridge firearm, whether restricted or unrestricted, is different as all components are "pre-made" and sold as a unit so you're never, technically, in possession of the individual components.

    Silly, yes. Necessary under Irish law, also yes.

    Was referring to the revolver itself, there is no difference in law between say a .44 percussion revolver and a .44 cartridge revolver.

    The loading components are another area and Pryodex and percussion caps would (or should) fall under the same rules as modern cartridge reloading components.

    While of course genuine Blackpowder is classed as an explosive.

    But of course whatever the reality is, you can be certain you won't get far trying to explain any of it to a Garda member :D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭ tac foley
    Registered User


    The Ruger Old Army, probably THE most popular C&B revolver of the modern era, ceased production back in 2008, to the howls of dismay from its many fans, me included. I bought mine on my blibble-blibble birthday in 1986, and it has probably had at least two whole church roofs shot through it since then.

    Ruger then went and cr*pped on our collective hats by reneging on their avowed intent to support the gun with spares for ten years. Three years after production stopped, I bought ALL the backstrap screws in existence [four] and a cylinder base pin [one]. Luckily, the thing is built like a D8, and being made almost entirely of stainless steel, will be around long after I'm dust on the wind.

    With the general handgun ban on mainland UK back in 1997/8, handgunners there bought them by the truckload, and from Ruger's own figures, it's estimated that there are around seven or eight thousand of them on the mainland, and a few up in the North. They sell here for between £450 and £800, depending on general state and seller greed. I provide owners in my club with replacement nipples at 1/3th the cost of buying them in UK.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭ tac foley
    Registered User


    archer22 wrote: »
    Was referring to the revolver itself, there is no difference in law between say a .44 percussion revolver and a .44 cartridge revolver.

    The loading components are another area and Pryodex and percussion caps would (or should) fall under the same rules as modern cartridge reloading components.

    While of course genuine Blackpowder is classed as an explosive.

    But of course whatever the reality is, you can be certain you won't get far trying to explain any of it to a Garda member :D.

    ...and meanwhile, how many .44cal cartridge revolvers do you know of in the RoI?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭ archer22
    Registered User


    If you want to do percussion gun shooting in Europe then best idea is move to France.

    I have even seen percussion revolvers and single shot guns for sale in supermarkets there...all you need to buy is proof that you are over 18 and a EU citizen.

    But that was a few years ago now, perhaps the law has changed there since.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭ archer22
    Registered User


    The Pietta target percussion revolver was an excellent gun also.

    I remember knocking in consistent 1.5 inch groups at 30 yards from a benchrest.

    Of course you had to wait between shots for the 'fog' to clear...and that was Pryodex :pac:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,342 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45
    Registered User


    archer22 wrote: »
    If you want to do percussion gun shooting in Europe then best idea is move to France.

    I have even seen percussion revolvers and single shot guns for sale in supermarkets there...all you need to buy is proof that you are over 18 and a EU citizen.

    But that was a few years ago now, perhaps the law has changed there since.

    Still Category D[over 18 only on ID to French residents and citizens] at the moment.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



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