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Which hospital to choose

  • 06-06-2019 8:02pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    Hi Boardsies,

    Very early posting here. Myself and my wife have just found out that we are due our first child in February 2020, we’re just starting to research and are lost in a mine of info. Trying to decide which hospital to go to (we live in Carlow). My initial thoughts would have been Kilkenny which is our closest hospital however I’ve heard some horror stories. Other options would be Waterford, Wexford and Dublin which are all within an hour (although Dublin could be far longer with traffic depending on the time of day). Is there anywhere I can read reviews for the maternity section of the various hospitals (rate my hospital doesn’t seem to have maternity specific info).

    Thanks in advance


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ THESPIDER


    Had my two ìn Wexford. Went public. Excellent care. One emergency section. Two sisters and few friends all went Wexford also. About 20 babies in total and no complaints from any of the mammys. Can't fault it from start to finish.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,510 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    My only knowldge of them was a colleague who said to me his wife was going to Waterford as it is a teaching hospital and they felt this was an advantage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,732 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    shesty wrote: »
    My only knowldge of them was a colleague who said to me his wife was going to Waterford as it is a teaching hospital and they felt this was an advantage.

    One thing about teaching hospitals and going public is that you'll have more strangers looking where few people have looked before. But, at that stage you may not care less.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,510 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Oh that's irrelevant, you leave your dignity at the door in pregnancy and childbirth anyway.I think this guy felt there would be more of a throughput of patients (and therefore more experience) in a teaching hospital, which was a fair enough point.I can't verify it one way or the other anyway.I had my babies in the Rotunda, and there were regularly student midwives there but I can't say that really meant a marked increase in who looked and how often!!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,732 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    shesty wrote: »
    Oh that's irrelevant, you leave your dignity at the door in pregnancy and childbirth anyway.

    Good for you. But would you be open at all to the possibility your opinion might not be universal?

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭ Cash_Q


    Good for you. But would you be open at all to the possibility your opinion might not be universal?

    I don't think that's a very fair reply to shesty who makes fair and valuable contributions to almost every post in this forum.

    I personally think it's also irrelevant how many people are looking at you, you can't have too much maternity care in my view. As shesty says, your dignity goes out the window. This is not a fault of staff or the number of staff who attend to you, I was of course treated in a dignifying manner by all staff in the Coombe, but they were splaying my legs apart after my section as I was numb, stripping me and changing my pads as I bled heavily, and milking me as I struggled to breastfeed. That's what's meant in using that term. Whether one person examined me or ten, my dignity went out the window so to speak!

    OP I attended the Coombe which is a teaching hospital and found it excellent to have groups of students at my bedside under a senior experienced doctor. I learned more about what was going on and as a teacher myself I felt it great to play a part in the student doctors education. It also helped to pass the time lol!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,732 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    Cash_Q wrote: »
    I don't think that's a very fair reply to shesty who makes fair and valuable contributions to almost every post in this forum.

    I'm more concerned about being fair to the OP who's looking for information.

    It's not the trainee midwives that are a problem it's the tired mother that doesn't want to be prodded by a consultant showing a bunch of young trainee doctors that a few years ago were sitting the leaving cert what x amount of dilation looks like.

    At least now they will be aware of it. Forewarned etc.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    Thanks for all the opinions guys. Anyone any experience of Kilkenny, my wife wants to go there but I’ve heard some horror stories


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    One thing about teaching hospitals and going public is that you'll have more strangers looking where few people have looked before. But, at that stage you may not care less.

    You can always refuse. Nobody is obliged to have students observing in a room if they’re so bothered. But TBH, shesty is right, many people wouldn’t even notice who was in the room when things are getting hot and heavy


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    Thanks for all the opinions guys. Anyone any experience of Kilkenny, my wife wants to go there but I’ve heard some horror stories

    I have friends who have gone there and heard no complaints. You will hear something bad about every hospital if you listen hard enough. People rarely take to the joe Duffy show to say good things about the hse. If you’re going private, ask for recommendations and choose your consultant accordingly. If you’re going publicly, remember that many of the doctors move around every six to twelve months in every hospital, so the doctor you heard a horror story about a year ago in Kilkenny may well be in Waterford or Wexford or Dublin now


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭ Cash_Q


    I'm more concerned about being fair to the OP who's looking for information.


    Don't want to derail this thread any further but it was the tone I was referring to rather than the point you were making.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,961 ✭✭✭ iwillhtfu


    Living in Carlow the last 10 years and the wife has had 4 kids all delivered in the Rotunda in Dublin. It began with the first, wife worked in Dublin so appointments were handy and Family are local up there we're exiled down here. I've no opinion on the other hospitals but couldn't have been happier with the staff in the Rotunda. All Labours were quite short and we almost got caught out on the second literally arrived at the front door and baby was born 10 mins later :eek:

    I guess the reasoning for sticking with a Dublin hospital was in the very remote off chance something went wrong wife and baby would most likely be transported to Dublin Temple st or otherwise.

    Wife went into labour one morning at rush hour and I think I was in the rotunda in about 40 mins from Carlow if not less ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 303 ✭✭ BriarPatch


    One thing about teaching hospitals and going public is that you'll have more strangers looking where few people have looked before. But, at that stage you may not care less.

    Are Student Doctors and Midwives confined to public patients?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,961 ✭✭✭ iwillhtfu


    BriarPatch wrote: »
    Are Student Doctors and Midwives confined to public patients?

    No. They will ask if it is ok if a student is present in my experience


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,732 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    BriarPatch wrote: »
    Are Student Doctors and Midwives confined to public patients?

    1st time we went public (I was a trainee), 2nd and 3rd time private. The first time being a new experience it felt more invasive. There were no students the last two times.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,281 ✭✭✭✭ TheValeyard


    About the horror stories....

    We always hear about them, but you never hear about the many, many successful happy stories. :)

    Fcuk Putin. Glory to Ukraine!



  • Registered Users Posts: 303 ✭✭ BriarPatch


    iwillhtfu wrote: »
    No. They will ask if it is ok if a student is present in my experience

    Oh I know they ask, I had a trainee doctor at my first and trainee midwife at my second.

    I just wasn't aware that they only attended births of public patients but I was public both times.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,241 ✭✭✭✭ road_high


    The “horror stories” are always doing the rounds-I’ve heard them about Waterford and portlaoise especially. Portlaoise patients using Kilkenny instead. I’m sure your gp will be able to guide you. St Luke’s would be a lot handier for appointments, scans etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,961 ✭✭✭ iwillhtfu


    BriarPatch wrote: »
    Oh I know they ask, I had a trainee doctor at my first and trainee midwife at my second.

    I just wasn't aware that they only attended births of public patients but I was public both times.

    Mine were

    private
    Semi private
    public
    public

    Asked about students each time and wife had no issue the kids have to learn.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,228 ✭✭✭ Loveinapril


    iwillhtfu wrote: »
    the kids have to learn.

    This is how I feel. I have a medical condition so attend hospital regularly (also a teaching hospital) and have no issue with students being present. If my willingness to be open, answer questions and allow them to examine me helps them become better doctors or nurses then I am glad to do my bit. I had to do placement during my (non medical) degree and appreciated that I was allowed to learn in a practical way. I had a student midwife present at my son's birth 18 months ago and literally could not have cared less. It actually helped keep myself and my husband distracted as we chatted to her about her course/ experience etc.It was a LONG labour so we actually had two separate ones on different shifts. They are often eager, enthusiastic and I wonder does it keep the midwife/ doctor in charge on their toes as they are being observed and are accountable for someone's learning.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,732 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    This is how I feel. I have a medical condition so attend hospital regularly (also a teaching hospital) and have no issue with students being present. If my willingness to be open, answer questions and allow them to examine me helps them become better doctors or nurses then I am glad to do my bit. I had to do placement during my (non medical) degree and appreciated that I was allowed to learn in a practical way. I had a student midwife present at my son's birth 18 months ago and literally could not have cared less. It actually helped keep myself and my husband distracted as we chatted to her about her course/ experience etc.It was a LONG labour so we actually had two separate ones on different shifts. They are often eager, enthusiastic and I wonder does it keep the midwife/ doctor in charge on their toes as they are being observed and are accountable for someone's learning.

    That sounds okay, I was referring to a team of junior doctors outside of the delivery room.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,228 ✭✭✭ Loveinapril


    That sounds okay, I was referring to a team of junior doctors outside of the delivery room.

    I have never heard of that happening. You have just reminded me that I did have a team of junior doctors attend my bedside during a pretty horrible diagnosis a few years ago without my consent. That wasn't maternity related so maybe it is managed differently in maternity hospitals.
    Most of my friends and peers had their kids in the Rotunda and most, like me, just had student midwives at appointments, scans or at delivery, just one each time. I have never had a student do anything invasive but I have allowed them to feel my tummy to guess baby's position, etc. I am 8 months pregnant now and again have had a few present at different things but I don't know if they do placement over the summer so I may have a student free birth this time!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    iwillhtfu wrote: »
    Living in Carlow the last 10 years and the wife has had 4 kids all delivered in the Rotunda in Dublin. It began with the first, wife worked in Dublin so appointments were handy and Family are local up there we're exiled down here. I've no opinion on the other hospitals but couldn't have been happier with the staff in the Rotunda. All Labours were quite short and we almost got caught out on the second literally arrived at the front door and baby was born 10 mins later :eek:

    I guess the reasoning for sticking with a Dublin hospital was in the very remote off chance something went wrong wife and baby would most likely be transported to Dublin Temple st or otherwise.

    Wife went into labour one morning at rush hour and I think I was in the rotunda in about 40 mins from Carlow if not less ;)

    That was my concern, getting to Dublin at rush hour and being stuck. I thought about the advantage of the other hospitals near by if something went wrong. The wife works in Kilkenny so it would be handiest for scans however while convenience is importance it’s not my main concern


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,510 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Semi-private on all three, student midwives around on all three, mainly during labour, birth and after-care.No objections on my part either, they aren't exactly taking it in turns to investigate.They are literally a second person in the room, observing and handing instruments etc if needed.Only once did a midwife ask did I mind if she checked something and then let the student check it too, and that was just to feel the bump to see could they work out the baby's position.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    BriarPatch wrote: »
    Oh I know they ask, I had a trainee doctor at my first and trainee midwife at my second.

    I just wasn't aware that they only attended births of public patients but I was public both times.

    I was private on my first, and there were three medical students and a trainee midwife looking on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    That sounds okay, I was referring to a team of junior doctors outside of the delivery room.

    There’s a huge difference between a junior doctor and a student. If you’re a public patient, you’re going to meet junior doctors from the team.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,235 ✭✭✭ javagal


    Can you not go to Portlaoise? Pregnant on my 3rd and 3rd time public there. First time was admittedly a disaster but thay was 7 years ago. No complaints since, parking is great, never huge traffic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    javagal wrote: »
    Can you not go to Portlaoise? Pregnant on my 3rd and 3rd time public there. First time was admittedly a disaster but thay was 7 years ago. No complaints since, parking is great, never huge traffic.

    We could actually go to Portlaoise either, hadn’t considered there, it’s about as close as Kilkenny


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,421 ✭✭✭ splinter65


    That sounds okay, I was referring to a team of junior doctors outside of the delivery room.

    But if a doctor wants to become an obstetrician then they have to start training somewhere. The more deliveries they are present for the more they learn, and we all benefit from it. You want to have experienced qualified personnel attending to you in hospital? Well, be prepared to be part of the learning experience.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,732 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    splinter65 wrote: »
    But if a doctor wants to become an obstetrician then they have to start training somewhere. The more deliveries they are present for the more they learn, and we all benefit from it. You want to have experienced qualified personnel attending to you in hospital? Well, be prepared to be part of the learning experience.

    I understand the hypocrisy. And the payment to avoid is worth it in my opinion. But again, I'm not talking about the delivery room, it's the run up to it.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



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