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Which hospital to choose

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Comments

  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Doesn't really matter though.I met some seriously competent students, doctors and midwives (who also were not yet worn down by working in the system and had a great manner!).They were never solely responsible for what they were doing, there was always someone in the room with them.Don't think it makes any difference if you are public or private that way.Met a couple of trainee GPs in my GP office too.We all have to learn somewhere, once someone is overseeing it's fine by me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,715 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    shesty wrote: »
    Doesn't really matter though.

    Not sure what you mean. Personal experience was that going private meant there was no 'Hi, my name is Dr x, these are my colleagues, we're going to examine where you are now'.

    I understand some may appreciate the extra attention or like that they are helping students/junior doctors learn. But, can you understand some others wont? It's that simple.

    To reiterate I'm talking about well before the delivery room.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    Not sure what you mean. Personal experience was that going private meant there was no 'Hi, my name is Dr x, these are my colleagues, we're going to examine where you are now'.

    I understand some may appreciate the extra attention or like that they are helping students/junior doctors learn. But, can you understand some others wont? It's that simple.

    To reiterate I'm talking about well before the delivery room.

    You seem to be debating public vs private, which isn’t what the OP asked. They asked for opinions on the different hospitals within a reasonable distance of their home


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,715 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    jlm29 wrote: »
    You seem to be debating public vs private, which isn’t what the OP asked. They asked for opinions on the different hospitals within a reasonable distance of their home

    Teaching hospitals, which were suggested, will also have a lot more teaching ( not surprisingly).

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    Teaching hospitals, which were suggested, will also have a lot more teaching ( not surprisingly).

    All public hospitals in Ireland are teaching hospitals. They all will have students throughout the year. There is no private maternity hospital.
    You must really like Chinese whispers


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,715 ✭✭✭ Chinese whospers


    jlm29 wrote: »
    All public hospitals in Ireland are teaching hospitals. They all will have students throughout the year. There is no private maternity hospital.
    You must really like Chinese whispers

    Only what I've read on this thread where people were raving about the benefits of teaching hospitals.

    I’m in love with him and I feel fine.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    Can you please bring this back on track. I don’t care about your opinions on teaching hospitals, if you want to discuss the merits of such please start your own thread


  • Registered Users Posts: 450 ✭✭ jopax


    I had my 3 in Waterford, the first I went with the midwife only care which was a huge mistake from my experience. After that my next 2 I just went with the regular public route. I can't complain about the care on the last 2 times.
    A lot depends on the type of labour you have, if it's very difficult one or an easy it will taint your memory of the experience.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,421 ✭✭✭ splinter65


    Can you please bring this back on track. I don’t care about your opinions on teaching hospitals, if you want to discuss the merits of such please start your own thread

    Grandnephew born in portlaoise last April, first baby for them. Everything very satisfactory.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24 ✭✭✭ Jasminecat


    I too would love to hear people's experiences and recommendations about where to give birth. I am 11 weeks pregnant. I am living in Kilkenny and I am apprehensive about giving birth in St. Lukes due to the high rates of c-sections for first time mothers (this is my first) Like most mothers, I would like my labour to have as little intervention as possible ie. No C-sections or instruments, unless of course absolute needed for the safety of my baby or me.
    From peoples experience, why are the rates so high?? I asked my GP but she had no answers or reassurance for me.
    Is it due to inexperienced doctors feeling it is safer on them to give a csection because they don't have the experience to assist in vaginal delivery ? Is it the hospital not giving women enough time to progress through labour before calling a csection to hurry things along? Is it a shortage of midwifes or experienced midwives in the delivery room to assist women through labour without doctor interventions? Is there just a culture in the hospital that its easier to give a csection in the fear of what might come up if allowed for vaginal delivery? Ie. Court cases if something went wrong during delivery etc.
    Would love to hear peoples experiences or recommendations of where to give birth. Obviously Kilkenny would be much handier location but safety and peace of mind is more important so if people had positive experiences please share, I am incredibly excited about my pregnancy but slightly terrified(mhopefully unnecessarily so) at the thoughts of my babies life and my life been in incompetent hands.

    Do people that have midwife led maternity care have lower rates of c-sections etc? It's all new to me and I don't know anyone who has given birth in Kk to her they experiences so all information is much appreciated.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24 ✭✭✭ Jasminecat


    Hi, do u mind if I ask why do u feel the midwife led was a mistake? And what was the main difference between midwife led or the regular public route?
    jopax wrote: »
    I had my 3 in Waterford, the first I went with the midwife only care which was a huge mistake from my experience. After that my next 2 I just went with the regular public route. I can't complain about the care on the last 2 times.
    A lot depends on the type of labour you have, if it's very difficult one or an easy it will taint your memory of the experience.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24 ✭✭✭ Jasminecat


    I can't post links but bump2babe.is has informative info of maternity care available nationally
    Hi Boardsies,

    Very early posting here. Myself and my wife have just found out that we are due our first child in February 2020, we’re just starting to research and are lost in a mine of info. Trying to decide which hospital to go to (we live in Carlow). My initial thoughts would have been Kilkenny which is our closest hospital however I’ve heard some horror stories. Other options would be Waterford, Wexford and Dublin which are all within an hour (although Dublin could be far longer with traffic depending on the time of day). Is there anywhere I can read reviews for the maternity section of the various hospitals (rate my hospital doesn’t seem to have maternity specific info).

    Thanks in advance


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Mod Note

    As requested, can posts respond to the OPs questions, rather than getting into an argument over public vs private.

    @blindside, I appreciate you are trying to get the thread back on track, but can you report posts that you feel are a problem rather than replying in-thread to them.

    Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,421 ✭✭✭ splinter65


    Jasminecat wrote: »
    I too would love to hear people's experiences and recommendations about where to give birth. I am 11 weeks pregnant. I am living in Kilkenny and I am apprehensive about giving birth in St. Lukes due to the high rates of c-sections for first time mothers (this is my first) Like most mothers, I would like my labour to have as little intervention as possible ie. No C-sections or instruments, unless of course absolute needed for the safety of my baby or me.
    From peoples experience, why are the rates so high?? I asked my GP but she had no answers or reassurance for me.
    Is it due to inexperienced doctors feeling it is safer on them to give a csection because they don't have the experience to assist in vaginal delivery ? Is it the hospital not giving women enough time to progress through labour before calling a csection to hurry things along? Is it a shortage of midwifes or experienced midwives in the delivery room to assist women through labour without doctor interventions? Is there just a culture in the hospital that its easier to give a csection in the fear of what might come up if allowed for vaginal delivery? Ie. Court cases if something went wrong during delivery etc.
    Would love to hear peoples experiences or recommendations of where to give birth. Obviously Kilkenny would be much handier location but safety and peace of mind is more important so if people had positive experiences please share, I am incredibly excited about my pregnancy but slightly terrified(mhopefully unnecessarily so) at the thoughts of my babies life and my life been in incompetent hands.

    Do people that have midwife led maternity care have lower rates of c-sections etc? It's all new to me and I don't know anyone who has given birth in Kk to her they experiences so all information is much appreciated.

    If you are looking for a hospital which will garuntee that your pregnancy and delivery will be trouble free and a happy experience for you, your baby and your loved ones then your search will be in vain.
    Maternity services are provided by other humans who make mistakes and are sometimes careless or just not very good at what they do the same as any other profession.
    I think a good starting point for you is to remember that you are pregnant, not sick injured or ill in any way, and you must continue to live your life in a healthy way and let nature take its course.
    You won’t need medical treatment unless you or your baby develop a pregnancy related medical condition, which doesn’t happen in the vast majority of pregnancies and is usually spotted very early and treated satisfactorily.
    Maternity care is just really the monitoring of your pregnancy by doing regular checks and building up to the delivery of your baby.
    Many women expecting baby 3 or 4 don’t realize that they are pregnant until 20 weeks or even more at which stage the pregnancy is 1/2 over.
    I personally would pick the hospital that is most convenient for me and will be handiest to get to in a rush, instead of trying to decipher which is “better”.
    Don’t forget. There is no garuntee that your preferred midwife or doctor will even be on duty when you go into labour. So form good bonds with all the staff you meet when attending ante natal visits so you won’t be disappointed when the delivery day comes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 192 ✭✭ Clashmore


    One thing to note with Kilkenny is they do not have a neo natal unit. So if required baby would have to moved to probably Waterford. My friend had an emergency section, baby was sent to Waterford straight away but she had to remain in Kilkenny for a day or 2 due to being to sick to travel.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    Clashmore wrote: »
    One thing to note with Kilkenny is they do not have a neo natal unit. So if required baby would have to moved to probably Waterford. My friend had an emergency section, baby was sent to Waterford straight away but she had to remain in Kilkenny for a day or 2 due to being to sick to travel.

    That’s exactly the kind of info I’m looking for. Thank you


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    I would also enquire does your choice of hospital include a 20 week anomaly scan as part of their schedule of appointments.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    shesty wrote: »
    I would also enquire does your choice of hospital include a 20 week anomaly scan as part of their schedule of appointments.

    Does this vary by hospital generally or is it just something you have to ask and pay extra for


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    Does this vary by hospital generally or is it just something you have to ask and pay extra for

    It varies by hospital. Some don’t offer it to anyone, but you could go and get scanned privately if you were attending one of those hospitals. A lot of hospitals offer it to everyone, public or private


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,281 ✭✭✭ Gatica


    I thought most hospitals had 12 week dating scan and a 20 week anomaly scan as standard. When it's included, it certainly isn't charged.

    I think choice of hospital based on their statistics isn't a bad idea. Sure, you can get good as well as bad doctors at any hospital but there are definitely trends, policies and culture, which influence the path your care is _likely_ to take.
    AIMS Ireland has good stats section http://aimsireland.ie/birth-statistics-for-ireland/ if you're interested.
    There's also different stances on breastfeeding, with some hospital being more encouraging in bf, and with others resolving everything with bottles. So it depends on your own outlook and what you want from your birth and follow-up.


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  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    The 20 week scan should be included but isn't in (I hope) a small number of hospitals-seems to be related to staffing issues??It is important and should be done, and if you are deciding between three hospitals, then it's worth asking the question.If you are going public all those scans and appointments should be free, if private it's an upfront fee for the consultant that should cover everything (although I know this can vary slightly between hospitals, some have extra charges for bloods etc for private patients).

    I'd be a bit wary of stats too.I think there was a report on the C-section rate alright, but I haven't drilled into the numbers....so be wary of stupid distortions like Kilkenny may have had a 50% C-Section rate out of 200 patients (which is 100 in total), but say Holles St may have had a 10% rate out of 2000 patients, (which is 200 in total) so......it really depends on what data is being used.(pulling numbers out of the air btw.)

    As someone else said, you aren't sick.There is one outcome here, that a baby is delivered.If you really want to compare, I'd consider location and proximity to yourself, scans offered and if a NICU is in the hospital, maybe if a midwife scheme is offered if you would like that.Unless there is some major proven issue with a hospital that you are aware of, there isn't much else to consider.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,281 ✭✭✭ Gatica


    shesty wrote: »
    As someone else said, you aren't sick.There is one outcome here, that a baby is delivered.

    I think for some people this is an important consideration beyond just getting a healthy baby. I don't think it's too much to ask to have a positive birth experience, where your wishes are honoured, where you have choices and controls over the type of care you receive, whether you end up with C-section or easy natural birth. Even where women are asked for consent for procedures or examinations and are made aware of it rather than telling them that this is what's happening and that's that, sign on the dotted line.
    If you want a medical approach with epidural and coached pushing, then your choices of care and, therefore, hospital preference may be different from someone who wants low-intervention, no pain relief unless they feel they really need it and to be allowed space and time to progress naturally. Obviously choice may be wider if you're up in Dublin or between 2 hospitals, and more limited if you're living right beside one already anyway.

    I do believe statistics are helpful in this regard irrespective of the actual numbers (unless you're talking 1 in 10 C-section, vs, say, 20 out of 200, as the number is too low to be statistically robust), as this may show a trend at a particular hospital and the attitude and culture of staff there.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    I did consider saying a "safe" delivery but so many people have differing views on that-everyone wants a safe delivery and for some people that might eventually mean getting the baby out no matter what, vs people who are traumatised because their wishes aren't heard or they feel the process is done to them, so to speak.I don't know if there is any good way to judge that from the few reports that exist though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    Thank you everyone for your input, we met with the GP today who advised that in her opinion we should go between a Dublin maternity hospital or Kilkenny. Her reasoning was that if god forbid there was an issue, the child would be transferred to Dublin so picking here would mean the mother and baby are close by. Kilkenny being the easiest accessible hospital so choose here if speed of access is the most important. My wife was leaning towards Kilkenny as she works here and it’s close to home so she was conscious or being able to get their quickly in an emergency. In the end we decided that my wife being at ease throughout the pregnancy was most important so we chose Kilkenny to take one worry off her mind. Thanks again for the input


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭ blindside88


    Also just to note, the gp advises that St Luke’s in Kilkenny do the anomaly scan at 27 weeks but we can request it be done at 20 weeks which we plan on doing


  • Registered Users Posts: 312 ✭✭ Abba987


    I understand the hypocrisy. And the payment to avoid is worth it in my opinion. But again, I'm not talking about the delivery room, it's the run up to it.

    You don't have to pay to avoid it ?


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Also just to note, the gp advises that St Luke’s in Kilkenny do the anomaly scan at 27 weeks but we can request it be done at 20 weeks which we plan on doing

    From past experience in the Rotunda, it apparently needs to be done between 20-24 weeks, as the baby grows too much for them to see everything they need to after that (just what I was told by the hospital, I don't know details I'm afraid), so maybe keep that window of time in mind when you request.I'm glad you found somewhere you are happy with.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,387 ✭✭✭✭ iamwhoiam


    shesty wrote: »
    From past experience in the Rotunda, it apparently needs to be done between 20-24 weeks, as the baby grows too much for them to see everything they need to after that (just what I was told by the hospital, I don't know details I'm afraid), so maybe keep that window of time in mind when you request.I'm glad you found somewhere you are happy with.

    I was at a scan recently with a family member and the Prof said the ribs thicken at about 24/25 weeks and its more difficult to see the heart after that

    ( this was not the usual anomoly scan which was done at 21 weeks )


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,493 Mod ✭✭✭✭ shesty


    Yes, I was told the above on my second where she was turned in an odd direction at the anomaly scan around 21 weeks and the sonographer told me I had to come back and it had to be by 24 weeks or she wouldn't be able to see the parts of the heart that she needed to, so sounds about right.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,820 ✭✭✭ jlm29


    shesty wrote: »
    Yes, I was told the above on my second where she was turned in an odd direction at the anomaly scan around 21 weeks and the sonographer told me I had to come back and it had to be by 24 weeks or she wouldn't be able to see the parts of the heart that she needed to, so sounds about right.

    It’s funny, because when I went for my anomaly, the sonographer couldn’t see the heart properly because of position, but she said that the later the better for me to find back, because it gets easier to see what they need to see.


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