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Building up leg muscles for running?

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  • 21-03-2019 11:01pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,683 ✭✭✭


    Hi Folks,

    Any suggestions for building up the upper leg muscles for running? Just recently started so dont know much but would like to work on it.

    Thanks in advance.


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 297 ✭✭Kissy Lips


    zweton wrote: »
    Hi Folks,

    Any suggestions for building up the upper leg muscles for running? Just recently started so dont know much but would like to work on it.

    Thanks in advance.

    1. Squats with 10 - 20 kg on the shoulders. Youtube form.

    2. Jog slowly up big hills, 300 metre+ ascent.


  • Registered Users Posts: 604 ✭✭✭echancrure


    Use cross-trainer machine in a gym without using your arms for 30' at first, varying slope and resistance (taking it easy first couple of weeks).


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,431 ✭✭✭sideswipe


    zweton wrote: »
    Hi Folks,

    Any suggestions for building up the upper leg muscles for running? Just recently started so dont know much but would like to work on it.

    Thanks in advance.

    Not being smart but the best way to build up leg muscles for running is by running. As mentioned above running hilly terrain is good for strength and endurance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,706 ✭✭✭MisterDrak


    Would agree with above. Had a achillies issue last year which prevented me from running for 6 months. Devoted myself to the gym for most of the period, to get lean (not big) with Squats, lunges and lots of core.

    When I did get back to the running, I still felt "heavy" for the first 6-8 weeks, with little or no improvement as to where I was. The leg muscles had been conditions to a particular type of training.


    If you want to run fast? - run fast...


    If you want to run long? - run long...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,080 ✭✭✭BeepBeep67


    zweton wrote: »
    Hi Folks,

    Any suggestions for building up the upper leg muscles for running? Just recently started so dont know much but would like to work on it.

    Thanks in advance.

    For what type of running?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,403 ✭✭✭run_Forrest_run


    unless you're specifically training for high burst sprints you don't need to worry about weights and all that nonsense.
    Just start running easy and the legs muscles will build up themselves, eat well (protein) and no need for protein shakes either...more nonsense.

    And run outside, mix up your routes with different gradient etc but nothing severe. No need to go near a gym.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,016 ✭✭✭Itziger


    Run.


  • Registered Users Posts: 933 ✭✭✭jamule


    2. Run more


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,414 ✭✭✭Lazare


    3. Recovery.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,414 ✭✭✭Lazare


    4. Run more.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,208 ✭✭✭shotgunmcos


    Find the steepest hill you can find. Run hard up it and walk/jog down. Repeat

    And in general, run more often.


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    unless you're specifically training for high burst sprints you don't need to worry about weights and all that nonsense.
    .

    What you see as nonsense many other runners and coaches see as an integral part of training, especially in an era of sedentary, returning to the sport type runners where overuse injuries and imbalances account for an alarmingly high injury rate among recreational runners


  • Registered Users Posts: 396 ✭✭carter10


    I often wondered why I didn't see more runners in my local gym and this thread tells me why! I ran for years on the road on the basis that more running/hills/intervals was the answer to improvement. Have been running + Gym for 18 months now- a huge improvement in my times and overall health profile. It's not nonsense.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,370 ✭✭✭pconn062


    As someone mentioned, it depends on the type of running you are doing. Sprinting/middle distance typically requires more explosive strength so weights/gym training are pretty essential. But most long distance runners would benefit from gym work too, even if they don't know it.

    And ignore everyone who says that all you need to do to build muscle strength for running is run. Running is definitely good for specific muscular strength but if you're just starting out running I would get into the habit of incorporating some gym work into your plan. It provides variety and will reduce your likelihood of getting injured. Hill sprints/reps and a great running specific way of building leg strength too but don't write off strength and conditioning.

    Start with 3-4 key exercises, get someone to show you how to do them or have a look on youtube, throw on a moderate amount of weight and get started. I personally like: split quats, deadlifts, bench press, and calf raises.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,016 ✭✭✭Itziger


    pconn062 wrote: »
    As someone mentioned, it depends on the type of running you are doing. Sprinting/middle distance typically requires more explosive strength so weights/gym training are pretty essential. But most long distance runners would benefit from gym work too, even if they don't know it.

    And ignore everyone who says that all you need to do to build muscle strength for running is run. Running is definitely good for specific muscular strength but if you're just starting out running I would get into the habit of incorporating some gym work into your plan. It provides variety and will reduce your likelihood of getting injured. Hill sprints/reps and a great running specific way of building leg strength too but don't write off strength and conditioning.

    Start with 3-4 key exercises, get someone to show you how to do them or have a look on youtube, throw on a moderate amount of weight and get started. I personally like: split quats, deadlifts, bench press, and calf raises.

    John Treacy says 'hello'!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    Itziger wrote: »
    John Treacy says 'hello'!!!


    You mean the two time world cross country champion with a background in grass and drills growing up as well as moving to a college program under a coach who is described as changing the whole program with his conditioning expertise? The one who was forced to shovel track repeatedly during blizzard conditions in order to be able to train?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,016 ✭✭✭Itziger


    KSU wrote: »
    You mean the two time world cross country champion with a background in grass and drills growing up as well as moving to a college program under a coach who is described as changing the whole program with his conditioning expertise? The one who was forced to shovel track repeatedly during blizzard conditions in order to be able to train?

    Yep.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,370 ✭✭✭pconn062


    Itziger wrote: »
    John Treacy says 'hello'!!!

    Things have moved on a lot since John Treacy though. If we are using elites as an example, there are very few top level runners these days not doing gym work. Our own recent medal winners Mark English and Ciara Mageann being two examples.

    My point though was more about the variety and injury prevention that weight training can provide. It shouldn't be written off with "just run more". Most newbies would benefit from a day in the gym over another 5k jog (or ideally, both!).


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    Itziger wrote: »
    Yep.

    So a man who did tons of conditioning (unconsciously) is the reason you think people shouldn’t do conditioning work?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,414 ✭✭✭Lazare


    KSU wrote: »
    So a man who did tons of conditioning (unconsciously) is the reason you think people shouldn’t do conditioning work?
    In fairness he didn't say people shouldn't do conditioning work.

    He was disagreeing with this comment..
    And ignore everyone who says that all you need to do to build muscle strength for running is run

    All you need to do to build muscle strength for running is run. That statement doesn't say S&C isn't beneficial.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    Lazare wrote: »
    In fairness he didn't say people shouldn't do conditioning work.

    He was disagreeing with this comment..



    All you need to do to build muscle strength for running is run. That statement doesn't say S&C isn't beneficial.

    I would disagree personally and believe this mentality is the reason why therapist physio appointment books are full across the country especially come marathon season.

    Just my 2c


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,414 ✭✭✭Lazare


    KSU wrote: »
    I would disagree personally and believe this mentality is the reason why therapist physio appointment books are full across the country especially come marathon season.

    Just my 2c

    I'd say ignorance of the role of recovery plays a huge part too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,535 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    pconn062 wrote: »
    Things have moved on a lot since John Treacy though. If we are using elites as an example, there are very few top level runners these days not doing gym work. Our own recent medal winners Mark English and Ciara Mageann being two examples.

    My point though was more about the variety and injury prevention that weight training can provide. It shouldn't be written off with "just run more". Most newbies would benefit from a day in the gym over another 5k jog (or ideally, both!).

    What is also interesting to note is the times that people were running then and now...
    While there is not doubt that the marathon has moved in hugely.. this is probably down to the dominant Africa runners.. but when you look at time that were ran before the big shift to S&C they were in most part faster..


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,535 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    zweton wrote: »
    Hi Folks,

    Any suggestions for building up the upper leg muscles for running? Just recently started so dont know much but would like to work on it.

    Thanks in advance.

    While the idea of strong upper legs sounds like a good one, its important to remember you don't just run with your upper legs. You also need lower legs, **Active** glute muscles (not just strong ones) .
    The gait cycle is a sequence, get the sequence right is the key to better efficiency and in turn running faster..
    I would also advise against doing isolated strength work as you (we) don't move in isolation


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,526 ✭✭✭✭28064212


    KSU wrote: »
    I would disagree personally and believe this mentality is the reason why therapist physio appointment books are full across the country especially come marathon season.

    Just my 2c
    I don't disagree per se, but why is there an assumption that the person that doesn't know how to sensibly approach running is going to sensibly approach S&C? For a beginner runner, I don't believe introducing squatting, lunges etc. is going to produce better results than just "run lots, but slower". It would be different if they had a personal coach, able to personalise a program

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  • Registered Users Posts: 595 ✭✭✭rooneyjm


    With all due respect to the poster I’d imagine his running is not that great. If he has for example 8 free hours a week to train then he should spend those hours running, that’s where they will be best spent if they want to improve as a runner. If they want to have nice quads and calves to look at, then hit the gym by all means.
    People generally are not good enough at their core sport to justify taking an hour or two out of it to lift weights. As a middle ground they could look at doing some body weight squats, lunges, planks, press ups etc after an easy run.


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    28064212 wrote: »
    I don't disagree per se, but why is there an assumption that the person that doesn't know how to sensibly approach running is going to sensibly approach S&C?

    I am not saying they do in fact quite the opposite,a headstrong runner (be it beginner or not) who is not gonna take the time to learn good form for running or conditioning exercises* is likely to have lower injury risk from the latter because by nature they are more controlled movements, while most advise against reps to failure even if you do at a certain point you will lose ability to perform movement. Running on the other hand gravity takes over and the foot is coming down one way or another with or with control.

    Running is one of the most simple things in the world. Because of this people rarely distinguish between competent controlled running and not so rarely do people take the time to acquire this skill

    * conditioning exercises meaning body weight ,given, much like running people won’t spend time learning form so would never advise unless they were supervised by a coach or had spent time learning form and movement prior to introduction of conditioning work


  • Registered Users Posts: 604 ✭✭✭echancrure


    rooneyjm wrote: »
    With all due respect to the poster I’d imagine his running is not that great. If he has for example 8 free hours a week to train then he should spend those hours running, that’s where they will be best spent if they want to improve as a runner. If they want to have nice quads and calves to look at, then hit the gym by all means.
    People generally are not good enough at their core sport to justify taking an hour or two out of it to lift weights. As a middle ground they could look at doing some body weight squats, lunges, planks, press ups etc after an easy run.

    That's quite a lot of assumptions...;)


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