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Barbed or electric fence

  • 27-02-2019 9:04pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,822 ✭✭✭ Dunedin


    Cut/strimmed down a number of ditches recently and they all need fencing now. My mains electric fence gives a lot of bother up and down and not realible

    Would folk go for electric or barbed given I have a clean slate. About a third of it is a mearing (bordering with neighbor) and thinking that three row of baarbed might be the safest there.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,998 ✭✭✭ visatorro


    Its dear but four strands is a job for life. Peace of mind


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,167 ✭✭✭ emaherx


    Dunedin wrote: »
    Cut/strimmed down a number of ditches recently and they all need fencing now. My mains electric fence gives a lot of bother up and down and not realible

    Would folk go for electric or barbed given I have a clean slate. About a third of it is a mearing (bordering with neighbor) and thinking that three row of baarbed might be the safest there.

    I'm going to be putting up a good bit of fencing this year myself, I'm going to put 3 strands barbed wire and one electric, or possibly 2 barbed wire 2 electric.

    If your mains fencer is not reliable maybe it's time to replace it or at least check connections / earth rod.


  • Registered Users Posts: 340 ✭✭ Nobbies


    Dunedin wrote: »
    Cut/strimmed down a number of ditches recently and they all need fencing now. My mains electric fence gives a lot of bother up and down and not realible

    Would folk go for electric or barbed given I have a clean slate. About a third of it is a mearing (bordering with neighbor) and thinking that three row of baarbed might be the safest there.

    hard to beat abarbie and posts well done.you can then forget about it for along time


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,818 ✭✭✭ bogman_bass


    Don’t go with3 strand go with 4. With 3 they can put their head through while scratching and it’ll go slack


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,818 ✭✭✭ bogman_bass


    Don’t go with3 strand go with 4. With 3 they can put their head through while scratching and it’ll go slack


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,768 ✭✭✭ Good loser


    Don’t go with3 strand go with 4. With 3 they can put their head through while scratching and it’ll go slack


    Would prefer 3 strand myself or even two against a ditch.


    If ditches are straight consider concrete strainer posts with struts.


    My electric fencer wires are generally strained to concrete posts - very easy to tighten over time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,907 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    Electric fence is such a simple system there’s no reason for it to be unreliable.
    Good energiser
    Well placed earth
    Good wire, no copper wire
    Good insulators.
    Keep growth off fence.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,822 ✭✭✭ Dunedin


    _Brian wrote: »
    Electric fence is such a simple system there’s no reason for it to be unreliable.
    Good energiser
    Well placed earth
    Good wire, no copper wire
    Good insulators.
    Keep growth off fence.

    Sur maybe around 9 Saturday morning. If I’m not around, just belt ahead and let me know when it’s sorted.......!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    2 or 3 strands of barbed in the ditch and let the whitethorn grow through it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,907 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    Dunedin wrote: »
    Sur maybe around 9 Saturday morning. If I’m not around, just belt ahead and let me know when it’s sorted.......!!!

    Right.
    Sure, you keep holding your breath there lad.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,160 ✭✭✭✭ Bass Reeves


    Electric fence all the way. Barbed wire fence is 4-5 times the price. Biggest issue with electric fence is lads will not do a deecnt earth system. 3-4 bars and linked right with proper galvanized eklectric fence wire. keep wire and posts out from ditch so hedge cutter can work inside it. Barbed wire is a nuisance and gaps will always be created

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    Electric fence all the way. Barbed wire fence is 4-5 times the price. Biggest issue with electric fence is lads will not do a deecnt earth system. 3-4 bars and linked right with proper galvanized eklectric fence wire. keep wire and posts out from ditch so hedge cutter can work inside it. Barbed wire is a nuisance and gaps will always be created

    My grandfather fenced a field with thorny wire and it's as good as Fort Knox. Right in the middle of the ditch. I don't know what year he put it up it but he died in 1968.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,063 ✭✭✭ riemann


    The only advantage of electric over barbed is cost.

    Depending on your stock, 3 or 4 rows of barb on Octos or PDM posts is a serious long term fence. If you're putting up 1 row it only takes a few minutes to put up another few when all the tools are on the ground including a hayes wire strainer. I often stick a row of electric on top to ensure stock don't bother trying to get near the fence.

    Electric might be quicker to install and cheaper, but all the time over the years clearing back overgrowth and finding faults has a cost too.

    Great peace of mind with the barb. If I had the money every bit of electric would be replaced in the morning. It's great as a temporary fence, not a permanent one.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,063 ✭✭✭ riemann


    My grandfather fenced a field with thorny wire and it's as good as Fort Knox. Right in the middle of the ditch. I don't know what year he put it up it but he died in 1968.

    Exactly, like a lot of things fencing is a skill that requires patience and practice. Some people would leave a hole installing a gate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,030 ✭✭✭ MfMan


    Problem with barbed wire is that stock can loosen the stakes by scratching off them. A belt from a mains fencer would keep them back much more.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,160 ✭✭✭✭ Bass Reeves


    I have to disagree with anyone who thinks that barbed wire is better than electric fences. The sheer cost alone is prohibitive. As I stated in an earlier post get your earth system right. I did not realize the benefit until I replaced mine a few years ago. Previous it was a single bar I replaced it with a earth plate and three bars now it drives the 5 leds on the tester all the time.

    You will fence and paddock a farm cheaper than you will do bounds only with Barbed wire. It is immaterial which you are using posts are critical. However PDM and octo post are no longer what they were 10+ years ago. They have changed from the original cresote to a newer weaker version. Keep the posts out from the ditch so that a hedge cutter can clean behind every few years. The real advantage of electric fences is moving stock you can move cattle right across a farm using pigtails and a few reels

    With electric fence not only will the cattle be on your farm they will also be in the field where you left them not in the ajoining field. But the real benefit is paddocking and running cattle in the biggest bunches possible so as to maximize grass output

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,053 ✭✭✭ Dinzee Conlee


    My grandfather fenced a field with thorny wire and it's as good as Fort Knox. Right in the middle of the ditch. I don't know what year he put it up it but he died in 1968.

    What kinda posts did he use?

    The bounds was fenced here with railway sleepers, prob sometime in the 1960s i’d imagine but not really sure...
    But they are almost gone by now, still, 50+ years isn’t too bad I suppose :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,822 ✭✭✭ Dunedin


    riemann wrote: »

    Electric might be quicker to install and cheaper, but all the time over the years clearing back overgrowth and finding faults has a cost too.

    Great peace of mind with the barb. If I had the money every bit of electric would be replaced in the morning. It's great as a temporary fence, not a permanent one.


    Starting to lean this way too. I seem to spend more and more time ensuring the mains is working. I have 4 earth rods probably connected by an electrician, no leakage anywhere and yet the power seems to be up and down.

    No doubt electric is fierce handy for paddocks but working towards baarbed for perm and boundary fences


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    What kinda posts did he use?

    The bounds was fenced here with railway sleepers, prob sometime in the 1960s i’d imagine but not really sure...
    But they are almost gone by now, still, 50+ years isn’t too bad I suppose :)


    Posts!!!!! Penty of good trees and white thorn. There's a healthy ditch up through it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,531 ✭✭✭ Say my name


    Dunedin wrote: »
    Starting to lean this way too. I seem to spend more and more time ensuring the mains is working. I have 4 earth rods probably connected by an electrician, no leakage anywhere and yet the power seems to be up and down.

    No doubt electric is fierce handy for paddocks but working towards baarbed for perm and boundary fences

    The very same as myself.

    That's what I eventually am working to do here. Sheep and barb for the boundaries and electric for the paddocks. I don't have sheep. Just don't like work and spraying ditches. And piece of mind if the electric does go that there's not a 4 a.m. call that there's stock on the road.

    With strainers and tractor driven post drivers and wire tensioners now there's no excuse now for bad sheep and barb wire fencing.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    The downside to external electric fencing is, stock from your neighbours can break in from the other side. Say you stop a field for silage, you will need to keep that part of the fence on all the time and so have to keep grass cut back from it.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,907 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    The downside to external electric fencing is, stock from your neighbours can break in from the other side. Say you stop a field for silage, you will need to keep that part of the fence on all the time and so have to keep grass cut back from it.

    Fairness we’ve had this where neighbors stock push threw hedge inside electric fence.

    Still, it kept them back until home was patched up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,160 ✭✭✭✭ Bass Reeves


    Posts!!!!! Penty of good trees and white thorn. There's a healthy ditch up through it.

    It is a crime to put barb wire on to trees and Whitethorn.

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,991 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    Had cattle chased here on rented ground one year, however bad it was taking regular wire off of cow's barbed would have been desperate. Can't stand the stuff, regular wire and a good electric fencer all the way


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    It is a crime to put barb wire on to trees and Whitethorn.

    What's the penalty?


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭ gozunda


    What's the penalty?

    Dead trees unfortunately :(. The wire will eventually cut through them heart wood and weaken the tree to wind etc . If you have good trees I wouldn't do it that way tbh. Electric fence is what I would suggest - keeps stock away from fence. If it's a bound ditch then certainly used barbed wire to stop stock from elsewhere which might gain access if the fence was off for whatever reason.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭ memorystick


    gozunda wrote: »
    Dead trees unfortunately :(. The wire will eventually cut through them heart wood and weaken the tree to wind etc . If you have good trees I wouldn't do it that way tbh. Electric fence is what I would suggest - keeps stock away from fence. If it's a bound ditch then certainly used barbed wire to stop stock from elsewhere which might gain access if the fence was off for whatever reason.

    Never had it here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭ gozunda


    Never had it here.

    Maybe you dont get the winds we do I dunno?

    In the last storm but one - bounds ditch had a number of bigger trees came down to my side. Cutting them up several we found had wire embedded in the wood close to where the trunk broke. It must have been put there before my time anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,160 ✭✭✭✭ Bass Reeves


    What's the penalty?

    Number of them as Gozunda it will kill trees and Whitethorn over time. It also devalues the wood, it is areason why Hurley makers will not take Ash trees from farms to make hurleys. However as well it means that hedge/ditch can never be cut back hard with a blade saw or a hedge cutter. Another problem is if a bounds is fenced like that other farms cattle can come in contact with yous this can spread TB, BVD etc.

    Slava Ukrainii



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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Barbed wire is the bane of hurley makers all over the country. Destroys chainsaws, cutting blades in timber mills etc.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



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