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Anyone regret reading a book?

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,114 ✭✭✭ BeerWolf


    Some fanfics...

    /shudders


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,313 ✭✭✭ valoren


    Day Lewin wrote: »
    The film is nothing like the story.

    "The Hobbit" is a children's book, originally written by the author for his own kids, bit by bit. A light-hearted book, with some funny scenes, talking animals etc. And a serious plot twist too.

    When Jackson had finished making "Lord of the Rings" he must have decided that the public love battles like video-games!
    - so, why doesn't he make a film of the Hobbit, like a Prequel, and simply fill it with video-game battles that go on and on and ON?
    It was a terrible film that I regret paying money for: but the original book should be viewed as a kid's story-book; fresh and innocent.

    The Peter Jackson adaptations are a cinematic example of the inverse square law.

    He originally pitched the Lord of the Rings as two movies but New Line decided that there was sufficient material in the books to actually warrant 3 films. Jackson was ecstatic. He, Fran Walsh and Philippa Bowens actually had to drop material from the books e.g. Beorn and the Scouring of the Shire which upset fans of the book. As Jackson himself put it "..this could actually go on and on and on". As such, over 3 very long films the subjective quality could be consistently strong as a consequence of the book being such a strong 'source' material.

    The opposite happened with The Hobbit movies. The source wasn't strong enough to warrant a trilogy. It was a children's book. It was sufficient for one long movie, not three but New Line wanted to follow the $ucce$$ formula from the original trilogy and the filmmakers had to drum up second rate, weak material to the detriment of the overall quality of three long movies.

    Inverse_square_law.svg

    Think of S as "The Lord of the Rings" with r as The Fellowship of the Ring movie. You get to make a rich, thematic movie but there is sufficient strength from S to allow 2r (The Two Towers) and 3r (Return of the King) to receive sufficient intensity from S with the subjective quality holding over time. The Hobbit simply didn't have enough strength in S to sustain it over 2r and 3r per above. If it was only done with r it would have been a classic film. So when someone says the Hobbit films were crap, just tell them "well that's the inverse square law for you". The plot and the running times were, as Bilbo himself might put it "....thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread"


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ topper75


    mariaalice wrote: »
    The bible is a very interesting book full of allegory and myth.

    There is no hope of understanding western culture without reading it.
    As they say in Irish - Tá siad fite fuaite lena chéile. Whether you like it or not.
    Nobody would be so dumb as to study Arabic culture and utterly ignore the Koran.

    I was not really a novel man, more non-fiction. I got gifted Dermot Bolger's The Valparaiso Voyage years back. Haven't touched another novel since.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,609 ✭✭✭ AudreyHepburn


    pauliebdub wrote: »
    I've just finished Gone Girl and found the ending very unsatisfying and just implausible.

    Agreed although I loved the book as a whole. I think the whole point of it was the none of the characters were particularly likable.

    The one book I regret reading entirely is The Road - so bleak and depressing and the film was even worse.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ topper75


    valoren wrote: »
    The Peter Jackson adaptations ... it would have been a classic film.

    I very much sensed this at the time, but I love the spelled out explanation of what went wrong!

    I foolishly tried to get girlfriend interested by bringing her to the third Hobbit movie. As she slumped down in her seat with boredom I could see her estimation of me going down in unison.


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  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 16,283 Mod ✭✭✭✭ quickbeam


    valoren wrote: »
    The opposite happened with The Hobbit movies. The source wasn't strong enough to warrant a trilogy. It was a children's book. It was sufficient for one long movie, not three but New Line wanted to follow the $ucce$$ formula from the original trilogy and the filmmakers had to drum up second rate, weak material to the detriment of the overall quality of three long movies.

    Nice analysis. Only one thing I'd correct is that the Hobbit book is so short, you couldn't have even made a long movie out of it. It could have made a nice 90 minute movie though.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 16,283 Mod ✭✭✭✭ quickbeam


    On topic (at least the topic that this thread has evolved into, as I don't think the OP just meant for us to mention hated books).

    Left Behind. The plot was bad enough to begin with but it's also incredibly badly explained. There's one paragraph where a woman offers someone a lift home. He says no thanks. in the next sentence he's getting out of her car and thanking her for the lift. It completely skips any mention of him changing his mind about taking the lift from her.

    That's just one example. The book is full of things that make no sense. I think I only read about a third of it before I couldn't take any more.

    Though an entirely different genre of book, the above description reminded me of the same sort of thing happening in Master & Commander which I read recently. I found it utterly impossible to figure out where or what was happening at any given time. I have serious disinterest in continuing with the series.


  • Registered Users Posts: 854 ✭✭✭ beveragelady


    quickbeam wrote: »

    Though an entirely different genre of book, the above description reminded me of the same sort of thing happening in Master & Commander which I read recently. I found it utterly impossible to figure out where or what was happening at any given time. I have serious disinterest in continuing with the series.

    I chain-read the Patrick O'Brian Aubrey-Maturin books after I discovered M&C by accident. They are engrossing and charming and enlightening and exciting and heartbreaking and amusing and occasionally bewildering but mostly perfect. The seafaring vocabulary leaks into my daily speech even now and the characters are like friends I wish I could ring for a chat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,372 ✭✭✭ Duffy the Vampire Slayer


    quickbeam wrote: »
    Nice analysis. Only one thing I'd correct is that the Hobbit book is so short, you couldn't have even made a long movie out of it. It could have made a nice 90 minute movie though.

    I actually think it could have made two films. The book is short, but relatively action packed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,372 ✭✭✭ Duffy the Vampire Slayer


    Joseph O'Connor, Redemption Falls.

    Such a disappointing follow up to the epic Star of the Sea.

    Yes, I was very, very disappointed.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,095 ✭✭✭ chrissb8


    The Luminaries

    The author would only get the book herself. Convoluted and trying to be far too smart. Adding nonsense that had nothing to do with the plot but just showed the authors knowledge in astrology. Well done for diluting what could have been a great story with a bunch of gobblygook.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,316 ✭✭✭ CQD


    chrissb8 wrote: »
    The Luminaries

    The author would only get the book herself. Convoluted and trying to be far too smart. Adding nonsense that had nothing to do with the plot but just showed the authors knowledge in astrology. Well done for diluting what could have been a great story with a bunch of gobblygook.

    I loved the luminaries..


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,184 ✭✭✭ Ardent


    The Da Vinci Code. A fifth grader could have written something with more substance to it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,699 ✭✭✭ The Pheasant2


    quickbeam wrote: »
    Though an entirely different genre of book, the above description reminded me of the same sort of thing happening in Master & Commander which I read recently. I found it utterly impossible to figure out where or what was happening at any given time. I have serious disinterest in continuing with the series.

    The jargon can be very heavy initially, I agree.

    But I would also really recommend sticking with them - with some help from a naval glossary you'll quickly get a general idea of what's going on in sailing terms, and that's all you need, the real fine points aren't necessary to fully imagine the manouevres occuring.

    That apart, the series is a triumph of historicity and characterisation. Amongst the finest historical series I've ever come across.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,226 ✭✭✭ The Mulk


    Agreed although I loved the book as a whole. I think the whole point of it was the none of the characters were particularly likable.

    The one book I regret reading entirely is The Road - so bleak and depressing and the film was even worse.

    I couldn't put the book down at the time. We had just had out first son, and he was lying in his crib beside our bed as I read the scene with the pregnant woman and the two men in the forest. It broke my heart. I still feel sad visualising that scene. Based on this I regret reading 'The Road'.

    I don't think that scene made it to the movie, i haven't watched it


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,021 ✭✭✭ RiderOnTheStorm


    I have never finished a book that I didnt like. There isn't enough time to read all the books in the world, so why waste time on one that you dont like?

    My mother-in-law insisted on finishing once she started. She saw it as a challenge if it was a bad book.

    Also.... I did write a novel once, and struggled to get it published. And every piece of advice I read said that the first page, the first paragraph, HAS to capture the reader. Then I read some piece of dross and get annoyed that they got this published. I always finish 1 chapter, just in case. But if it hasn't hooked me by then ... Off to the next one!


  • Registered Users Posts: 416 ✭✭ uncommon_name


    John Grisham's An Innocent Man. Like reading a shopping list. I know it is non-fiction but there wasn't any flow to it.

    That's disappointing to hear. It was the next book on my list.


  • Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 23,072 Mod ✭✭✭✭ GLaDOS


    Don't think i can say I've ever really regretted reading any book. Even if I didn't like it, I can usually take something positive from it.

    Some books I loved mentioned a few times here. Amazed at The Road being mentioned so often!

    Cake, and grief counseling, will be available at the conclusion of the test



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,021 ✭✭✭ RiderOnTheStorm


    ....boks started but never finished:
    Catch 22
    Moby Dick
    Great Expectations

    OP.... Do try that concentration camp book. A depressing/ thought-provoking story might still be a good book. "Mans Search For Meaning" (viktor frankls personal story of life in various concentration camps) is a favourite of mine and I get something positive out of it every time i read it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,228 ✭✭✭✭ mariaalice


    ....boks started but never finished:
    Catch 22
    Moby Dick
    Great Expectations

    OP.... Do try that concentration camp book. A depressing/ thought-provoking story might still be a good book. "Mans Search For Meaning" (viktor frankls personal story of life in various concentration camps) is a favourite of mine and I get something positive out of it every time i read it.

    I have read Mans Search for Meaning but that is in a slightly different vain i.e how to find meaning in suffering.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭ Day Lewin


    ....boks started but never finished:
    Catch 22
    Moby Dick
    Great Expectations

    OP.... Do try that concentration camp book. A depressing/ thought-provoking story might still be a good book. "Mans Search For Meaning" (viktor frankls personal story of life in various concentration camps) is a favourite of mine and I get something positive out of it every time i read it.

    Catch-22 is one of those rare books that make far more sense on a second reading. Sorry, but it's true!
    The dénouement at the end of the first reading is unexpected and shocking: and thus, iif you re-read, it will be found to have influenced the entire story up to then - the flash-backs etc - now that you know what they were flask-backing To. Enlightenment - (and black humour)


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,092 ✭✭✭ The Tetrarch


    A book about the Mafia, can't remember the title or author.
    I won't read another books about them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,209 ✭✭✭ KatyMac


    Faerie Tale by Raymond Feist ... I was reading it during my lunch breaks because it was so scary I couldn't read it unless I had company around me. I used to be literally scared stiff and had to look up to see other people around me! But to be honest I don't regret reading it and may some day re-read


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Politics Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 81,351 CMod ✭✭✭✭ coffee_cake


    There have been plenty of books i didn't like but none i actually regretted.
    Maybe the windup girl. Thomas covenant books.
    shrug


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 11,962 Mod ✭✭✭✭ riffmongous


    Moby Dick

    I read an adaptation (rip off) of the ending section once in a Warhammer book that really had me interested in reading the original.. then once I found it and started it I found it to be so incredibly dull at times that I just skipped to the end. Total waste of time for me sadly


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭ Deise Vu


    ....boks started but never finished:
    Catch 22
    Moby Dick
    Great Expectations

    OP.... Do try that concentration camp book. A depressing/ thought-provoking story might still be a good book. "Mans Search For Meaning" (viktor frankls personal story of life in various concentration camps) is a favourite of mine and I get something positive out of it every time i read it.

    I read Catch 22 about 30 years ago and I recall that I loved a lot of it but there is a huge section in the middle that was just torturous On the pain of death though, don't read Heller's follow-up "Something Happened". Relentlessly depressing, unhumourous (it's not meant to be) self absorbed, drivel.

    Another book that was supposed to capture the zeitgeist was The World According to Garp. It was supposed to be funny and feminist. I thought it was misogynistic and about a funny as a guinness, chicken tikka masala and piles combination.

    This won't be popular but Lord of the Rings was the first book that I started and decided life was too short and finishing books was not compulsory.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭ Day Lewin


    Deise Vu wrote: »

    Another book that was supposed to capture the zeitgeist was The World According to Garp. It was supposed to be funny and feminist. I thought it was misogynistic and about a funny as a guinness, chicken tikka masala and piles combination.

    Giggle, so true! It was a desperately dull book. I didn't finish.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 16,283 Mod ✭✭✭✭ quickbeam


    If the Garp film is anything to go by then I've zero interest in the book.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 16,283 Mod ✭✭✭✭ quickbeam


    I chain-read the Patrick O'Brian Aubrey-Maturin books after I discovered M&C by accident. They are engrossing and charming and enlightening and exciting and heartbreaking and amusing and occasionally bewildering but mostly perfect. The seafaring vocabulary leaks into my daily speech even now and the characters are like friends I wish I could ring for a chat.

    Each to their own. And I do know that feeling especially close to favourite book characters, but M&C just wasn't for me. It wasn't just the nautical terminology it was constantly having no clue of what was going on. As per above, one minute they were in the middle of a battle and the next minute they were back in harbour and I'd no idea how they got there. Oh, and reading about battle after battle got boring very quickly. I had zero interest in these particular characters or their exploits.

    I do tend to finish all books I've started though as I feel I don't have the right to an opinion unless I've finished them. So, got through M&C and happy to now know that it's not for me.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,633 ✭✭✭✭ Buford T. Justice XIX


    Mod note: This thread is more suited to the Literature forum. I'll close it and move it now.


    Please note the new forum and change of forum rules.


    Buford T. Justice.


This discussion has been closed.
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