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The Mosasaur Thread

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  • 04-05-2011 12:26pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭


    It looks like protein tissue from the Cretaceous mosasaur Prognathodon has been found.
    I for one look forward to seeing the monster in Sea World :)
    Swedish scientists detail their new mosasaur find. The researchers note that the earlier ancient protein extractions have been controversial, but note that their new research is backed up by several tests to corroborate the tissue's authenticity.

    The researchers used infrared microspectoscopy, mass spectrometry, and a chemical analysis on the ancient sea-going predator's remains to make sure what they had found was not contamination from bacteria or other modern sources.

    Read more here.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSWgWh_6LQm3dYzH5pXiQtyu8aq-C_5lmpi_ENpDuvIBIGTLFHz&t=1


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 ✭✭✭Rubecula


    Does this mean that getting a sample of DNA is possible?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,169 ✭✭✭Alvin T. Grey


    Imagine the possibilities of sequencing that??/?

    You finally get to see if your classification of the amimal families was right, and what there closest living reletives are. That could make understanding what the creatures habits and behaviour was easier.

    Now, if they could only find a sample of Rex...


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor



    Now, if they could only find a sample of Rex...

    What ever happened to the soft tissue they found in a T-Rex leg bone?


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 91,051 Mod ✭✭✭✭Capt'n Midnight


    Imagine the possibilities of sequencing that??/?

    You finally get to see if your classification of the amimal families was right, and what there closest living reletives are. That could make understanding what the creatures habits and behaviour was easier.

    Now, if they could only find a sample of Rex...
    Even if you dont have the DNA you could still sequence the protein and compare it to the proteins coded by known DNA sequences.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    What ever happened to the soft tissue they found in a T-Rex leg bone?

    As far as I know it's ongoing...
    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=56732221


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,169 ✭✭✭Alvin T. Grey


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    What ever happened to the soft tissue they found in a T-Rex leg bone?

    It was tasty......:D


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    They also swam like sharks, not eels, but this had already been revealed :D

    http://www.livescience.com/17071-mosasaur-fossil-skin-locomotion.html

    mosasaurus_shark_tail.jpg

    mosasaur-scales.jpg?1321481284


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    Guess that'll be the end of the undulating mosasaurs so.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 ✭✭✭Rubecula


    A shark's skin supposedly helps it move more effortlessly through the water. (I am not sure this is true but it seems to be.) So if this is the case then other marine creatures that evolved a similar system is not beyond the bounds of possibility really.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    Rubecula wrote: »
    A shark's skin supposedly helps it move more effortlessly through the water. (I am not sure this is true but it seems to be.) So if this is the case then other marine creatures that evolved a similar system is not beyond the bounds of possibility really.

    Its actually to be expected. And yes, the denticles in a shark's skin help it move better underwater- I remember someone was designing a diver's suit that replicated a shark's skin. It allowed the divers/swimmers to move much faster than with normal suits!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    Huh huh....

    butthead-butt-head.jpg&sa=X&ei=I9nKTr-7OsrKhAfdx7nxDw&ved=0CAwQ8wc&usg=AFQjCNHDbF8KEQkiyhNTTq5mLtmCpWuyJw

    Denticles.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    And not only that; a freshwater mosasaur with legs. It could probably crawl on land.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/12/121219-sea-monster-new-species-freshwater-paleontology-science/

    20121219-pannoniasaurus-rekonstrukcio.jpg

    pannoniasaurus_by__tibor_pecsics.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭Kess73


    The T-Rex of inland waterways :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 ✭✭✭Rubecula


    Kess73 wrote: »
    The T-Rex of inland waterways :pac:

    Oh no don't. Please don't .... :D

    Another good find Adam, I bet one of them would keep herons from the fish pond.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    Chalk up another transitional fossil.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    Rubecula wrote: »
    Oh no don't. Please don't .... :D

    Another good find Adam, I bet one of them would keep herons from the fish pond.

    Would probably eat all the fish too XD


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor




  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    Ichthyosaurs in the Cambrian? Now wouldn't that be something? They must be hanging out with Robin Hood!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 ✭✭✭Rubecula


    See I knew Ichthyosaurs were totally awesome they even invented time machines, and perpetual motion mechanisms.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    What, now you need to be registered to READ their articles?

    Shame on you, Nat Geo. You used to be cool.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    Working normally for me and I never registered? :confused:


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor




  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭Galvasean


    How do they know the remains were scavenged?


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    It's an assumption apparently, because the jaws and skulls were not the "meaty parts", or that's what I think I read... :pac: Then again, I was under the impression that mosasaurs ate their prey either whole or in huge chunks, bones and all, so I don´t know...


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    Study included ancient sea turtle, mosasaur and ichthyosaur. Apparently mosasaurs had a dark back and a light underbelly which is not surprising in an aquatic predator, whereas the ichthyosaurs were completely black.

    Not sure how accurate this may be... after all, if those are the melanosomes preserved, wouldn´t one expect to find only the black pigmentation? Or did I get something wrong?

    http://www.livescience.com/42415-ancient-marine-beast-color.html

    ich-mosasaur.jpg?1389199230


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 9,694 Mod ✭✭✭✭Manach


    Again, echoing OP from what I remember of the fossilisation of soft material was always a very hap-hazard process, but not completely unknown.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭Kess73


    Seems to be a technique that would come a very large margin of error.

    If we were to take it as being the norm for medium to large aquatic animals and also medium to large aquatic/semi aquatic reptiles, then what evolutionary advantage was there for modern day aquatic animals of size to lose the same black colourations?

    I think that some extinct sea reptiles etc may have been black, but think colourations may have been as varied as they are today, and free swimming predators in particular would most likely have had body colourations that aided them ( dark on top, light underneath). Now I could see the advantage for an ambush predator to be dark or dull in colour, but again this would not mean that it had to be black.

    The UV protection bit I think is also very debatable as if it was such a big advantage ( even taking what we think the climate was like back then) then it would still make evolutionary sense now.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭Adam Khor


    No shark-like coastal nurseries for baby mosasaurs (at least some of them) after all:

    http://www.futurity.org/mosasaurs-babies-895672/

    Csotonyi_JuvenileMosasaur_1170-770x616.jpg


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  • Registered Users Posts: 218 ✭✭Linnaeus


    At least some species of Mosasaurs may have given birth to live offspring, like Ichthyosaurs. According to the article "Viviparity in Mosasaurs", from mapoflife.org, Carsosaurus marchesetti, described as a primitive "mosasaurid" of the Cretaceous, was certainly viviparous. A fossil of a pregnant Carsosaurus with four embryos has been discovered.


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