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Light rail for Galway

  • 23-12-2017 6:25pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2 WillieB1


    Hi Recently I went into Holland's Newsagents in Galway, and the girl in there asked me if I would like to sign a petition for the Light rail, which I think is a fantastic idea, but I said is Galway not to small, maybe now it is but in 20 years time they expect the pop to be 140,000, do we wait for the traffic to get worse before we start planning, so I signed up immediately , the more I think about same the better the idea, if its doing such a fantastic job in Dublin why not in Galway. hope to get opinion

    WillieB1


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,838 ✭✭✭ thesandeman


    You have walked into a minefield just in time for Christmas.

    Btw I agree.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,090 ✭✭✭ dok_golf


    Great idea. Right up there with the western rail corridor


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,769 Mod ✭✭✭✭ nuac


    A Light Railway system may be part of a solution to Galway's traffic problem


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,502 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    You really think Galway is going to get the go ahead for light rail before Cork ?

    This is Ireland they will only try and sort a problem after it gets desperately bad


  • Registered Users Posts: 72,647 ✭✭✭✭ colm_mcm


    "I hear those things are awfully loud"


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭ ronnie3585


    Is there a chance the track could bend?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,028 ✭✭✭ mrsdewinter


    What route do they envisage? I've often thought that the city would be suited to an orbital track that connected the suburbs without going into the city centre, which is, after all, well served by buses.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,076 ✭✭✭✭ Fr Tod Umptious


    colm_mcm wrote: »
    "I hear those things are awfully loud"

    "It glides as softly as a cloud"


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,076 ✭✭✭✭ Fr Tod Umptious


    ronnie3585 wrote: »
    Is there a chance the track could bend?

    "Not on your life my Hindu friend"


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,477 youngrun


    Would be a great idea,
    Potential loops , outer and or inner
    Barna, Moycullen, cross the Corrib, Headford Road, Claregalway, Parkmore, Oranmore and city
    Or Cappagh Road, Newcastle, cross River, headford Road, Parkmore, Doughiska, Eyre sq


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub


    Galway doesn't have anywhere near the required population to support it. The green line would move the entire population of Galway in less than a day


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,320 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2


    Now that would be a waste of money

    BRT is as much as ever should be invested in Galway


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,971 ✭✭✭ DaCor


    Won't happen for the next 30-40 years.

    Removing private cars from the city centre, setting up Park and Rides, adding bus corridors to the main arterial routes and high frequency bus timetables will all see Galway fine until at least 2050.

    There is no logical reason for it now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,070 ✭✭✭ SeaSlacker


    I’m kinda surprised none of the cyclists here have pointed out the issues the ones in Dublin are having with the Luas. Very dangerous if you’re not careful, a lot of getting the front wheel into the tracks and going over the handlebars. Nasty stuff.

    As a matter of history, Galway once did have a tram system that went from Eyre Square to Salthill. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galway_and_Salthill_Tramway#


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,971 ✭✭✭ DaCor


    SeaSlacker wrote: »
    I’m kinda surprised none of the cyclists here have pointed out the issues the ones in Dublin are having with the Luas. Very dangerous if you’re not careful, a lot of getting the front wheel into the tracks and going over the handlebars. Nasty stuff.

    Is that not a case "look where you are going" for those folks who fell off?

    It's like a driver complaining about broken suspension because he didn't slow down for a speed ramp or the

    Pay attention and there won't be an issue. I say this as a cyclist


  • Registered Users Posts: 857 ✭✭✭ Unrealistic


    Galway doesn't have anywhere near the required population to support it. The green line would move the entire population of Galway in less than a day
    It's probably not fair to compare the Galway proposal to the LUAS. Dublin already has five times as many stations as is proposed for Galway, and if you compare the proposed (but not yet built) stations in Dublin the ratio is even higher. There are a number of cities across Europe in the 80,000 to 120,000 population range that have tram or light rail systems, including some that have opened in recent years.
    lawred2 wrote: »
    Now that would be a waste of money

    BRT is as much as ever should be invested in Galway
    But, yes, this is a much more sensible option.
    DaCor wrote: »
    SeaSlacker wrote: »
    I’m kinda surprised none of the cyclists here have pointed out the issues the ones in Dublin are having with the Luas. Very dangerous if you’re not careful, a lot of getting the front wheel into the tracks and going over the handlebars. Nasty stuff.
    Is that not a case "look where you are going" for those folks who fell off?

    It's like a driver complaining about broken suspension because he didn't slow down for a speed ramp or the

    Pay attention and there won't be an issue. I say this as a cyclist
    I thought that too but some reports I've been hearing have changed my mind. As I understand it there are two main issues.
    1) The problem with getting the wheels caught in tracks sometimes isn't just down to not looking where you are going. It has become much more pronounced since the LUAS cross city link opened because the layout there forces bicycles to cross the tracks at a sharper angle so a slight deviation can have a wheel in the groove. Because the road layout is tighter there too it can result in other vehicles getting to close so that taking evasive action is what causes bike wheels to end up in the groove.
    2) A separate problem is that the rails apparently get very slippy when it rains and that can bring riders down without wheels needing to get caught.
    There's more about it here. http://www.stickybottle.com/latest-news/cyclists-luas-crash-injuries/


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional West Moderators Posts: 6,715 Mod ✭✭✭✭ connemara man


    DaCor wrote: »
    Won't happen for the next 30-40 years.

    Removing private cars from the city centre, setting up Park and Rides, adding bus corridors to the main arterial routes and high frequency bus timetables will all see Galway fine until at least 2050.

    There is no logical reason for it now.

    Just asking the question but just because we don't need it now shouldn't we be planning to need it and where it's going to go?

    Like this could be a key part in how the city grows next. Galway is currently suffocating under the crisis management strategy of it's city planning. So maybe literally planning the next 50-60 years of houses, roads, transport, and communities, is the best way to go


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,889 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    There are a number of cities across Europe in the 80,000 to 120,000 population range that have tram or light rail systems, including some that have opened in recent years.

    Can you name a few please, so we can make some meaningful comparisons?

    I was horrified at the recent public meeting to discover that the comparison being done was with a French city population 240,000. Meaningless. And then someone commented that the light-rail systems in many French cities have had difficulty meeting their projected demand levels anyway - that's with the population already in their cities.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,971 ✭✭✭ DaCor


    Just asking the question but just because we don't need it now shouldn't we be planning to need it and where it's going to go?

    Like this could be a key part in how the city grows next. Galway is currently suffocating under the crisis management strategy of it's city planning. So maybe literally planning the next 50-60 years of houses, roads, transport, and communities, is the best way to go

    Yes, that's called the LAP's, local area plans. Already a well established process.

    What you are looking for is a complete overhaul of all the rules. Not going to happen in the life of the next 2 governments due to capacity issues


  • Registered Users Posts: 857 ✭✭✭ Unrealistic


    Can you name a few please, so we can make some meaningful comparisons?

    These are some that popped up when I searched.

    Aubagne, France; pop. 55k
    Besancon, France; pop. 116k
    Mestre, Italy; pop. 89k
    Bergamo, Italy; pop. 119k
    Mulhouse, France; pop. 112k
    Valenciennes, France; pop. 44k
    Nancy, France; pop. 105k
    Orleans, France; pop. 114k
    Soller, Spain; pop. 14k
    Strausberg, Germany; pop. 26k
    Liepaja, Latvia; pop. 69k
    I was horrified at the recent public meeting to discover that the comparison being done was with a French city population 240,000. Meaningless. And then someone commented that the light-rail systems in many French cities have had difficulty meeting their projected demand levels anyway - that's with the population already in their cities.
    To be clear, as I already said above, I think a Bus Rapid Transit system is a much more sensible option for Galway. I only pointed out the smaller European cities that have tram or light rail systems because I thought that using the Luas/Dublin as a sole comparison was lazy and/or misleading.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,645 ✭✭✭ Webbs


    These are some that popped up when I searched.

    Aubagne, France; pop. 55k
    Besancon, France; pop. 116k
    Mestre, Italy; pop. 89k
    Bergamo, Italy; pop. 119k
    Mulhouse, France; pop. 112k
    Valenciennes, France; pop. 44k
    Nancy, France; pop. 105k
    Orleans, France; pop. 114k
    Soller, Spain; pop. 14k
    Strausberg, Germany; pop. 26k
    Liepaja, Latvia; pop. 69k

    .

    Thanks for the list I was intrigued to see how other places did it and had a bit of a search through the first few and most actually serve a much bigger urban area such as
    Bergamo, Italy; pop. 119k densely urbanized area with slightly less than 500,000 inhabitants
    Mulhouse, France; pop. 112k 284,739 inhabitants in the metropolitan area


    But the one that amazed me and is surely something for Galway to look at is Aubagne, granted the tram project is not really what the GLUAS people are looking at as is only 2.7km long but its their attitude to public transport that got my attention.
    Both their buses and Trams are zero fare, how this is funded I am not sure but what a great idea to get people out of cars and into buses, I knew Tallin had a zero fare tram but not with a place of the small size of Aubagne.


  • Registered Users Posts: 785 ✭✭✭ Paddico


    Keep dreaming lads, wont in the next 40 years.
    Unless the find the black stuff in Galway Bay that is .........


  • Registered Users Posts: 725 talking_walnut


    I'm always surprised that so many people seem to be for a light rail system while so many seem against an increase in bus lanes and corridors. Surely that's the cheaper, easier and faster option.


    Disclaimer: Purely an anecdotal observation. They might not be the same group of people either.


  • Registered Users Posts: 235 ✭✭ dropping_bombs


    I'm always surprised that so many people seem to be for a light rail system while so many seem against an increase in bus lanes and corridors. Surely that's the cheaper, easier and faster option.
    .

    I think people are against bus lanes etc. because buses in Galway (Ireland?) are very unreliable. I am sure there is not one person in the city who has never has a bad experience with a city bus, and this adds up to a lack of trust in the suppliers.

    I do wonder however if there was further privatization of bus routes and park and rides in the city would this improve the bus service and lessen the traffic issues?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,166 ✭✭✭ xckjoo


    I think people are against bus lanes etc. because buses in Galway (Ireland?) are very unreliable. I am sure there is not one person in the city who has never has a bad experience with a city bus, and this adds up to a lack of trust in the suppliers.

    I do wonder however if there was further privatization of bus routes and park and rides in the city would this improve the bus service and lessen the traffic issues?

    I've been trying to use them more recently and they've been okay reliability wise. The RTI app and Journey Planner help. Biggest issue is that there's very few bus lanes. Not sure how privatization would help.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,084 ✭✭✭ what_traffic


    I think people are against bus lanes etc. because buses in Galway (Ireland?) are very unreliable. I am sure there is not one person in the city who has never has a bad experience with a city bus, and this adds up to a lack of trust in the suppliers.

    I do wonder however if there was further privatization of bus routes and park and rides in the city would this improve the bus service and lessen the traffic issues?
    NO, but Bus Lanes would help current Network and P& R if it is ever rolled out. Only 10% of current Bus Network (for both Public and Private Bus Companies) has bus priority in Galway City.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,889 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    I think people are against bus lanes etc. because buses in Galway (Ireland?) are very unreliable. I am sure there is not one person in the city who has never has a bad experience with a city bus, and this adds up to a lack of trust in the suppliers.

    I do wonder however if there was further privatization of bus routes and park and rides in the city would this improve the bus service and lessen the traffic issues?

    Soo ...

    People don't like buses because they're unreliable.

    But they're also opposed to the very thing (bus lanes) which would make the buses more reliable.

    Logic at its finest.




    Re privatisation: we have currently have one state-owned bus operator, and a number of private ones operating in Galway. All of them have the same reliability problems, due to traffic congestion. None of them have the capacity to add extra buses into the system to allow for congestion. (I'm not even sure if the NTA would allow that, even if a company could afford to do it.) On factors other than reliability, I'd say that the state-owned operator is in the middle - some of the private companies are better, but some are worse. Overall, more of it wouldn't make any difference.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,084 ✭✭✭ what_traffic


    All of them have the same reliability problems, due to traffic congestion. None of them have the capacity to add extra buses into the system to allow for congestion. (I'm not even sure if the NTA would allow that, even if a company could afford to do it.) On factors other than reliability, I'd say that the state-owned operator is in the middle - some of the private companies are better, but some are worse. Overall, more of it wouldn't make any difference.

    + all of them are asking for the same thing as well - more bus lanes/priority measures, have heard(public transport meetings) and seen(twitter) reps and owners of BusEireann,City Direct and Burkes Bus's all ask for this in the past few months.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,971 ✭✭✭ DaCor


    + all of them are asking for the same thing as well - more bus lanes/priority measures, have heard(public transport meetings) and seen(twitter) reps and owners of BusEireann,City Direct and Burkes Bus's all ask for this in the past few months.

    By all accounts, they'll soon be getting them


This discussion has been closed.
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