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Running on Dual Carriageways - is it okay?

  • 08-11-2017 3:34am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3 Kodoque


    So I've been looking to change up my route and run from Kildare Town to Naas, about 20km but it seems the only real way to get there is to run along the dual carriageway r455, it's probably a stupid question, alas I'm wondering if it's even legal to do so?

    I've never seen anyone run, I've seen cyclists many times, and the RSA has zero information on whether it's legal.

    So just wondering if anyone has experience with long distance running across Ireland that isn't just the normal doing loops of your town etc. And if anyone has ever run along the dual carriageway what was your experience?


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Comments

  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 20,320 Mod ✭✭✭✭ RacoonQueen


    You can walk on it so you can run on it too I assume. Not sure how safe I'd feel running on one...had to run up part of the N11 once when I got lost on a lunchtime run. Was not fun. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 354 ✭✭ loudymacloud


    Kodoque wrote: »
    So I've been looking to change up my route and run from Kildare Town to Naas, about 20km but it seems the only real way to get there is to run along the dual carriageway r455, it's probably a stupid question, alas I'm wondering if it's even legal to do so?

    I've never seen anyone run, I've seen cyclists many times, and the RSA has zero information on whether it's legal.

    So just wondering if anyone has experience with long distance running across Ireland that isn't just the normal doing loops of your town etc. And if anyone has ever run along the dual carriageway what was your experience?

    Did it a few times in Athlone, cant say i enjoyed it all that much. The constant fear of some car doing 120km veering over too close.

    On the stretch of road you are looking at would you have to run past an exit, if so i would find that rather dangerous


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,003 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2


    Kodoque wrote: »
    So I've been looking to change up my route and run from Kildare Town to Naas, about 20km but it seems the only real way to get there is to run along the dual carriageway r455, it's probably a stupid question, alas I'm wondering if it's even legal to do so?

    I've never seen anyone run, I've seen cyclists many times, and the RSA has zero information on whether it's legal.

    So just wondering if anyone has experience with long distance running across Ireland that isn't just the normal doing loops of your town etc. And if anyone has ever run along the dual carriageway what was your experience?

    I'm sure it's fine to do so

    I doubt it's safe or fun though


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,989 ✭✭✭✭ The Muppet


    I run on the Swords bybass regularly and I have not been arrested yet. I run in the hard shoulder and always facing approaching traffic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,344 ✭✭✭✭ drunkmonkey


    At the Inquest it will be recorded as an accidental death. Don't tempt faith. Pick a different route.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,003 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2


    At the Inquest it will be recorded as an accidental death. Don't tempt faith. Pick a different route.

    fate


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,683 ✭✭✭ ronaneire


    Kodoque wrote: »
    So I've been looking to change up my route and run from Kildare Town to Naas, about 20km but it seems the only real way to get there is to run along the dual carriageway r455, it's probably a stupid question, alas I'm wondering if it's even legal to do so?

    I've never seen anyone run, I've seen cyclists many times, and the RSA has zero information on whether it's legal.

    So just wondering if anyone has experience with long distance running across Ireland that isn't just the normal doing loops of your town etc. And if anyone has ever run along the dual carriageway what was your experience?

    That's the old road from Newbridge to Naas? I have seen some people run on it before.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,335 ✭✭✭ EC1000


    Legal? Yes. Wise? No.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,836 ✭✭✭✭ ThisRegard


    I can't really remember that dual carriageway particularly well so don't know the limits, but it could be safer than running on regular road. Take the Tallaght bypass from the Square to the M50. I would say that's a pretty safe road to run down, limits are low enough, traffic doesn't go too mental and plenty of space off the road should you need it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,339 ✭✭✭ fletch


    Looks absolutely fine for running on tbh, just make sure you wear high viz and stay close to the edge of the hard shoulder...to be honest, it looks a lot safer than most country roads as at least you have a hard shoulder to run in. And as already mentioned, run in the opposite direction to traffic.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 540 ✭✭✭ Slow_Runner


    There is a hard shoulder on that road and iirc the speed limit is 80kph with flash for cash there regularly. However I think the biggest danger is traversing the roundabout coming into Naas (at the Mway junction) - pretty busy with no facilities for pedestrians.
    If it was me, I wouldn't do it........


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,896 ✭✭✭ Sunny Dayz


    Technically and legally you can run on a dual carriage way. But would you feel safe doing so? Some here mentioned the Athlone by-pass - IMO that's a very dangerous road to run on as it's between two motorway sections and many drivers don't reduce their speeds. I've seen cyclists on it a few times and even at that I would worry about them. Impact on a cyclist or runner at speeds in excess of 100 kmph don't bear thinking of. I sometimes run on a national road, hard shoulder, hi-vis, against the traffic flow and at times I find that scary enough when you see cars traveling at speed, you are in a very vulnerable condition.


    Lastly bear in mind that if you do decide to run on the dual carriageway, to wear bright clothing, hi visand also a light of some description - we only have daylight now for a few hours, many days are dull and wet and the visibility of a unexpected pedestrian in the hard shoulder is greatly reduced.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,570 ✭✭✭ Lazare


    Had to run a small stretch of the N7 at Citywest before after misjudging my route, with the traffic on a dark wet morning.

    Was scary as hell tbh.

    Obv that's not what you're thinking of doing but either way I'd avoid it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,836 ✭✭✭✭ ThisRegard


    To be a contrarian, if the advice given is to avoid that particular road, what's the alternative, a single lane regional or local road with less visibility, cars probably driving similar speeds and no shoulder or verge?


  • Registered Users Posts: 540 ✭✭✭ Slow_Runner


    ThisRegard wrote: »
    To be a contrarian, if the advice given is to avoid that particular road, what's the alternative, a single lane regional or local road with less visibility, cars probably driving similar speeds and no shoulder or verge?
    I would say the alternative road you describe is not an alternative and should also not be used. I do 95% of my running on rural back roads and there are some roads I will not run on, you need to factor in:
    1: Traffic volume
    2: Speed of traffic
    3: Verge/hard shoulder - I always go on roads where there is space to move/jump in off the road
    4: Any busy/dangerous junctions to cross
    This is just a basic list but you get the idea, advice here is don't run on the dual carriageway and use common sense when picking an alternative - my take is, if you can't find a safe route between x and y then don't run from x to y, no point getting maimed or killed for a hobby.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,335 ✭✭✭ EC1000


    I would say the alternative road you describe is not an alternative and should also not be used. I do 95% of my running on rural back roads and there are some roads I will not run on, you need to factor in:
    1: Traffic volume
    2: Speed of traffic
    3: Verge/hard shoulder - I always go on roads where there is space to move/jump in off the road
    4: Any busy/dangerous junctions to cross
    This is just a basic list but you get the idea, advice here is don't run on the dual carriageway and use common sense when picking an alternative - my take is, if you can't find a safe route between x and y then don't run from x to y, no point getting maimed or killed for a hobby.

    Good advice above. I live in the sticks a stones throw from the N4 which I would have to run on for at least 1km in order to get to another road. For this reason, I usually drive a km or two to get to a safe starting point and go from there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,380 ✭✭✭✭ walshb


    Gimme a dual carriageway over a quiet country road any day of the week.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,836 ✭✭✭✭ ThisRegard


    I would say the alternative road you describe is not an alternative and should also not be used. I do 95% of my running on rural back roads and there are some roads I will not run on, you need to factor in:

    That's my point, the dual carriageway may bethe better option in this case, it's relatively safe.

    Vast majority of my road running is on rural back roads too, mostly single lane. I avoid the busier ones but I don't think that simply the fact that a road is a dual carriageway should rule it out altogether without factoring in other things.

    Many dual carriageways would be pretty safe, they tend to have street lighting at the busier sections. There was a thread in the commuting forum a while ago from someone who drove the road around Dunboyne complaining about people out walking on it and how dangerous it was. It too had a a good hard shoulder and grass verge on both sides.


  • Registered Users Posts: 540 ✭✭✭ Slow_Runner


    ThisRegard wrote: »
    That's my point, the dual carriageway may bethe better option in this case, IF it's relatively safe.
    FYP :)
    Totally agree that a dual carriage way should not be excluded as a running route just because it has 4 lanes, it's all down to each individual to risk assess the route however off the top of my head I can't think of a dual carriage way that I would consider safe to run on due to volume and speed of traffic


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,003 ✭✭✭ ronnie085


    Kodoque wrote: »
    So I've been looking to change up my route and run from Kildare Town to Naas, about 20km but it seems the only real way to get there is to run along the dual carriageway r455, it's probably a stupid question, alas I'm wondering if it's even legal to do so?

    I've never seen anyone run, I've seen cyclists many times, and the RSA has zero information on whether it's legal.

    So just wondering if anyone has experience with long distance running across Ireland that isn't just the normal doing loops of your town etc. And if anyone has ever run along the dual carriageway what was your experience?

    I ran the Newbridge Naas road fairly often, always felt safe, big hard shoulder and not mad busy. Toughers roundabout the only tricky bit, up onto the grass for that,although never crossed the bundle of sticks roundabout at Naas end.


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  • Administrators Posts: 33,521 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ dudara


    I had to make an emergency stop years ago on the hard shoulder of the N7 (three lane carriage way southbound). While stopped, my car was rear-ended by another driver who was driving in the hard shoulder. I think it's absolutely suicidal to put yourself on the hard shoulder of a dual carriage way or motorway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,380 ✭✭✭✭ walshb


    dudara wrote: »
    I had to make an emergency stop years ago on the hard shoulder of the N7 (three lane carriage way southbound). While stopped, my car was rear-ended by another driver who was driving in the hard shoulder. I think it's absolutely suicidal to put yourself on the hard shoulder of a dual carriage way or motorway.

    Agreed, and should be illegal as well.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,836 ✭✭✭✭ ThisRegard


    dudara wrote: »
    I had to make an emergency stop years ago on the hard shoulder of the N7 (three lane carriage way southbound). While stopped, my car was rear-ended by another driver who was driving in the hard shoulder. I think it's absolutely suicidal to put yourself on the hard shoulder of a dual carriage way or motorway.

    Only time I was hit by a cars when I was driving was on a narrow country road and in a residential estate, therefore it's absolutely suicidal to run on a country road or within a housing estate.

    Everyone should know that you walk or run in the opposite direction to the traffic. If you were to be rear ended in that situation then there's something wrong if you don't hear the carnage and explosions behind you leading up to that point.


    Nobody mentioned motorways.

    I know I'm being very flippant, but as the guys have said evaluate the roads you're going to run on individually.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20 ✭✭✭ psalm69


    OP - Do you run on the Curragh? You could make up a safe 20k using the Curragh, and footpaths in Kildare Town, Newbridge, Athgarvan.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,335 ✭✭✭ EC1000


    ThisRegard wrote: »

    Everyone should know that you walk or run in the opposite direction of the traffic.

    FYP


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 6,319 Mod ✭✭✭✭ TFBubendorfer


    walshb wrote: »
    Gimme a dual carriageway over a quiet country road any day of the week.

    I spent 13 years running thousands of miles on quiet country roads without a single incident. You don't know what you're talking about.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 27,836 ✭✭✭✭ ThisRegard


    EC1000 wrote: »
    FYP

    Absolutely, corrected.


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,380 ✭✭✭✭ walshb


    I spent 13 years running thousands of miles on quiet country roads without a single incident. You don't know what you're talking about.

    Lucky fooker!....

    Now, go run 1000s of miles on the dual carriageway so we can compare!

    I know what I'd choose, and I know what I think is a little safer!

    No incidents......well, I believe this because an incident would likely mean your ass is grass! Unless you had a collision with a fellow runner.....could survive that one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,003 ✭✭✭ ronnie085


    dudara wrote: »
    I had to make an emergency stop years ago on the hard shoulder of the N7 (three lane carriage way southbound). While stopped, my car was rear-ended by another driver who was driving in the hard shoulder. I think it's absolutely suicidal to put yourself on the hard shoulder of a dual carriage way or motorway.
    It's not exactly the N7, it's the old naas bypass, very quite most times of the day , 80kph speed limit, long straight road with big hard shoulder, would consider it as safe as you'll get for road running. Now the N7 is another story altogether, driving it is bad enough wouldn't dream of running on it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,373 ✭✭✭ ger664


    I spent 13 years running thousands of miles on quiet country roads without a single incident. You don't know what you're talking about.

    Thats cause every other sane person was asleep :rolleyes:


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