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Parthenaise cattle.

  • 30-09-2017 12:30pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 169 ✭✭ Farmer Dan


    Saw these at the ploughing.
    Good looking cattle.
    Anyone much experience of them & what sort of calves would you get from black white head or angus cows. Would they bring more muscle to the calves v a limousin.
    Appreciate any advice & thanks in advance.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ charolais0153


    Farmer Dan wrote: »
    Saw these at the ploughing.
    Good looking cattle.
    Anyone much experience of them & what sort of calves would you get from black white head or angus cows. Would they bring more muscle to the calves v a limousin.
    Appreciate any advice & thanks in advance.
    Bb> pt is my advice


  • Registered Users Posts: 169 ✭✭ Farmer Dan


    Bb> pt is my advice

    Thanks charolais0153 & I could see how that would be a great cross.
    I have Bwh cow's & used a hereford bull. The calves to be good only when selling I can still only get a hereford price iykwim.
    Looking at improving my calves quality & parthenaise caught my eye.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ charolais0153


    Farmer Dan wrote: »
    Thanks charolais0153 & I could see how that would be a great cross.
    I have Bwh cow's & used a hereford bull. The calves to be good only when selling I can still only get a hereford price iykwim.
    Looking at improving my calves quality & parthenaise caught my eye.

    Belgian blue are better than parthanesi. Is what i meant.
    Id try and get an easy calving charolais bull for the cows. Parthaneise dont sell well


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭ Willfarman


    They don't sell well but they are great cattle. Very docile light boned high kill out percentage. Just had difficulty getting fat score on bullocks at times here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,466 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    They have that dreaded Jersey colour about them. Not that well known as a breed either. Doesnt help sell them as stores.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    The ideal job for these is as a sucker cow and then cross a blue bull onto them.
    No point using a blue bull on whiteheads. The cow won't bring out the muscle of the blue. I have gotten up to €4.25 per kg for blue weanlings off of parthenaise cows.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,110 ✭✭✭ jfh


    I picked up one of these cheap last year, purely down to the jersey colour on him,
    Off topic, the blue crosses very well on the angus.
    Blue cow x angus bull


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    jfh wrote: »
    I picked up one of these cheap last year, purely down to the jersey colour on him,
    Off topic, the blue crosses very well on the angus.
    Blue cow x angus bull

    Most bulls cross well with a blue cow to be fair. I have a couple here and the cow brings that bit of muscle to the cross. Have bred good limousine, blonde, parthenaise and blues off of them over the years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 169 ✭✭ Farmer Dan


    They have that dreaded Jersey colour about them. Not that well known as a breed either. Doesnt help sell them as stores.

    What colour would the calves come parthenaise x whitehead? What attracted me was the double muscling along with easy calving.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭ Willfarman


    Farmer Dan wrote: »
    What colour would the calves come parthenaise x whitehead? What attracted me was the double muscling along with easy calving.

    Do you sell as weanlings? It's hard to beat a good Charolais on a whitehead in my opinion.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,930 ✭✭✭ Who2


    Charolais are great for selling but they are a big lazy sleepy lump of an animal, you'd need to be getting 200 more than the average animal to allow for the extra loses and the rooting with having them. And as for extra weight they'll carry it alright, but they don't put on anymore than a decent limo or part. It's alright keeping a ch bull if your around the whole time but no good for the part timer. I'd actually have a blue bull ran with the cows than arch again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ charolais0153


    Who2 wrote: »
    Charolais are great for selling but they are a big lazy sleepy lump of an animal, you'd need to be getting 200 more than the average animal to allow for the extra loses and the rooting with having them. And as for extra weight they'll carry it alright, but they don't put on anymore than a decent limo or part. It's alright keeping a ch bull if your around the whole time but no good for the part timer. I'd actually have a blue bull ran with the cows than arch again.

    Easy calving charolais bull and plenty of minerals. Lzf and fiston and the like. A bad white calf is worth as much as a good red or black calf a lot of the time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 169 ✭✭ Farmer Dan


    Willfarman wrote: »
    Do you sell as weanlings? It's hard to beat a good Charolais on a whitehead in my opinion.

    Weanlings or year & halves.
    Working full time so afraid of charolais or Belgian blue.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,930 ✭✭✭ Who2


    Easy calving charolais bull and plenty of minerals. Lzf and fiston and the like. A bad white calf is worth as much as a good red or black calf a lot of the time.

    I don't know where your going but there's far more lads around me looking for limo and something with a bit of style rather than big heavy boned slack backed charolais.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ charolais0153


    Who2 wrote: »
    I don't know where your going but there's far more lads around me looking for limo and something with a bit of style rather than big heavy boned slack backed charolais.

    Not round here


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Ye are like 2 bald men fighting over a comb lads. In the weanlings sales there is nothing to touch a blue.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭ Willfarman


    Or here. There's nowhere near enough charolais cattle to meet demand. The c section type blues may be a seller for export but ordinary types (and there are plenty)wouldn't have the gentleman farmer finishers hammering each other at all. Refer to the prices and pictures from Roscommon in the journal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Willfarman wrote: »
    Or here. There's nowhere near enough to meet demand.

    Blues?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭ Willfarman


    Grueller wrote: »
    Blues?

    I had to edit it!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Willfarman wrote: »
    Or here. There's nowhere near enough charolais cattle to meet demand. The c section type blues may be a seller for export but ordinary types (and there are plenty)wouldn't have the gentleman farmer finishers hammering each other at all. Refer to the prices and pictures from Roscommon in the journal.

    Listen to David Quinn's mart report on South East for last Wednesdays weanlings show and sale. Charolais society sponsored it. Champion was a charolais weighing 582kg and made €1480.
    That is €2.54 per kilo.
    On the same night blues were selling for €3 - 3.50 per kilo and up to a tops of about €4.30 per kilo. The c section point of view is way out of date too. I calves 45 cows to a blue in the last year. The rest were billed to parthenaise, blonde and limo to breed replacements. Not one section nor any pull that should have been either. The only bull I have ever had that caused me a lot of sections was actually a charolais bought from a very prominent breeder.
    Don't get me wrong, I love charolais cattle. They are noble animals but a blue beats all in the sale ring.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ charolais0153


    Grueller wrote: »
    Listen to David Quinn's mart report on South East for last Wednesdays weanlings show and sale. Charolais society sponsored it. Champion was a charolais weighing 582kg and made €1480.
    That is €2.54 per kilo.
    On the same night blues were selling for €3 - 3.50 per kilo and up to a tops of about €4.30 per kilo. The c section point of view is way out of date too. I calves 45 cows to a blue in the last year. The rest were billed to parthenaise, blonde and limo to breed replacements. Not one section nor any pull that should have been either. The only bull I have ever had that caused me a lot of sections was actually a charolais bought from a very prominent breeder.
    Don't get me wrong, I love charolais cattle. They are noble animals but a blue beats all in the sale ring.

    Friend of the auld lad had an exceptional bb jeufer around 280~300 kg i think. Our charolais heifer was 6 weeks older and 390 kgs. Ours made 1100e . his had to be 3.80kg plus to make same price . whats the difference between them


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    I am putting up a docket for some bull weanlings sold recently. The price per kilo average circled in red is dragged a long way back by the limousins.
    The oldest blue there was born February 21 2017. The limousins sold as a pair were born early and mid January.
    Edit:
    Just to relate the topic to the op, two of the best three prices per kilo there were off ptx cows.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭ Willfarman


    The c section is far from out of date. Pedigree blue cattle are unethical at best! I'm not a fan. Cattle should have some stardard of correctness,functionality and proportion. But there's always serious prices for extreme muscled types for export. The Italian mafia like cattle with big arses!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Friend of the auld lad had an exceptional bb jeufer around 280~300 kg i think. Our charolais heifer was 6 weeks older and 390 kgs. Ours made 1100e . his had to be 3.80kg plus to make same price . whats the difference between them

    6 weeks is 42 days @ 1.25 kg per day conservative estimate. That is 52.5 kg extra at the same weight.
    Now she is 290 + 52.5 = 340kg.
    1100÷ 340 = €3.23 per kilo. No problem to a quality blue.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,942 ✭✭✭ charolais0153


    Grueller wrote: »
    I am putting up a docket for some bull weanlings sold recently. The price per kilo average circled in red is dragged a long way back by the limousins.
    The oldest blue there was born February 21 2017. The limousins sold as a pair were born early and mid January.
    Edit:
    Just to relate the topic to the op, two of the best three prices per kilo there were off ptx cows.
    Are the limousins heifers calves


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Willfarman wrote: »
    The c section is far from out of date. Pedigree blue cattle are unethical at best! I'm not a fan. Cattle should have some stardard of correctness,functionality and proportion. But there's always serious prices for extreme muscled types for export. The Italian mafia like cattle with big arses!

    We are not going to agree on this but I have been in plenty of charolais breeders yards where there were zippers in cows sides too.
    Yes the pedigree blues are sectioned out but very very few commercial blues are nowadays. Our vet has a huge practice and would concur on the sections too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Are the limousins heifers calves

    One of them only. Two of the blues were by accident.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    Are the limousins heifers calves

    Are you not one of the younger brigade here? Get out on a Saturday night for pints and not be talking cattle with Auld lads.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,738 ✭✭✭ CloughCasey1


    Grueller wrote: »
    Are you not one of the younger brigade here? Get out on a Saturday night for pints and not be talking cattle with Auld lads.

    He's still too young for pints yet.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    He's still too young for pints yet.

    Never too young sure didn't we all start at 15 with harp and twenty Carroll's. Sure look where it got us.


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