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What I log about when I log about running

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Monday, September 18th
    Plan: 11km Race pace & speed, strides and [email protected]
    Total: 11km (1:20:03)
    Avg Pace: 7:15 min/km
    Avg HR: 150 Max HR: 173
    Splits: 2k [email protected]:56. [email protected]:39. [email protected]:20. Cool-down plod.

    I had a niggle in my back, just below my ribcage all day and I assumed I’d slept funny. I headed on this run and my heart rate was a little bit high right from the start. It all felt okay, though. The race-pace section felt quite hard but better once I’d settled into it. I remember this session being surprisingly difficult the first time I did it, so I wasn’t concerned. Unfortunately, the wee back niggle was worse when I finished and then I woke up coughing in the middle of the night. My chest felt constricted. I felt lousy on Tuesday but thought I’d turned a corner yesterday. I’d another bad night last night and while I don’t think I’ve a full-blown chest infection, I definitely have some sort of a chest cold, which probably means I’ll be skipping Saturday. It’s annoying because I don’t feel unwell, especially once I’m upright :P I’ve looked around at alternative halfs and nothing seems to be immediately presenting itself. Not to worry, I’ve achieved nice PBs at 5 and 10k from this block of training, so I can’t be too disappointed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,552 ✭✭✭ Wubble Wubble


    Sorry to read of this. HMs are normally hard enough when you're in full health. Best of luck with the recovery and/or finding another HM :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 745 ✭✭✭ gypsylee


    That's a pity about the HM. You are right to listen to your body and concentrate on getting back to full health.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,338 ✭✭✭ eyrie


    Oh no! Really sorry to hear you're feeling unwell, particularly at this stage having put in all the hard work! I'd say keep an open mind maybe, if you got a good night's sleep tonight you might feel a whole lot better tomorrow. Lots of fluids in the meantime!! I'll keep my fingers crossed for you anyway!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,600 ✭✭✭ Annie get your Run


    Huzzah! wrote: »
    I’ve looked around at alternative halfs and nothing seems to be immediately presenting itself. Not to worry, I’ve achieved nice PBs at 5 and 10k from this block of training, so I can’t be too disappointed.

    What great attitude :) so sorry to hear you're not well but the training won't go to waste for sure. There might be a couple of options listed here http://www.athleticsireland.ie/runzone/fixtures/. Hope you're feeling better soon!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    I just read over all of your lovely words of encouragement and now I'm embarrassed :o

    So, maybe I should change my username to the girl who called wolf. I'm prone to chest infections and had to dropout of the GT5k last year when I was struck down with a bad one. When I had the warning symptoms, I thought the worst.

    I started to feel much better on Friday and the tightness was mostly gone from my chest, so I went out for a short recovery run. I felt okay on this but was still undecided on the half when the alarm went off this morning. I got up and ate breakfast with my OH, who was racing. I told him I wasn't racing but proceeded to get dressed and decided I'd make the trip to Newbridge House and see how I was feeling when I got there. And what a trip it was! Given the difficulties, I kind of thought it would be rude not to run and lined myself up between the 2:10 and 2:20 pacers. 2:15 was always the goal for this race (and has been since the first time I raced a half). I had briefly flirted with the idea of heading out with the 2:20 group and trying to pick it up, but didn't truly fancy the idea of leaving myself with that much work to do.

    Kilometers 1-5

    I headed off slightly too quickly and, to be perfectly honest, I felt cr*p from the start. The first small bump of a hill left me dreading the rest of the run. I was aiming for 6:23 splits and was hitting 6:15s approximately, but I didn't want to break my rhythm I'm not sure what happened at Lusk. I felt truly awful but my pace had picked up considerably. I struggled to slow down, despite the pace not agreeing with me. I just couldn't find a rhythm. I was worried that the 2:10 pacers were still well within sight. I stopped at the first water station and settled myself before heading on again at a more suitable pace.

    Kilometers 6-11

    A stitch was starting. I was hot. I was miserable. I spent most of this stretch wondering how I'd get back to Newbridge House if I quit. I was worried my other half would be worried if I stopped and it took me an age to get back to him. The pace was pretty okay through here until the stitch really took hold on a hill. I'm not sure where this hill was but I think it was around the 8th kilometer. A kind man stopped as he thought I was in distress. I'm really going to have to get something printed for the top I wear racing: “I'm okay; it's just a stitch”. Another man checked on me and someone offered me water. I was fairly frustrated at this point and I was embarrassed when people were stopping for me. I got rid of the stitch really quickly using the usual technique and started running again. I had to stop and walk again on the last big climb just before the Man O'War. I just didn't have the legs and when I realised that the last walk only set me back by about 30 seconds, I wasn't too concerned. The stitch was starting to bite again, anyway. Both of these walking segments slowed my time, but not as much as you'd think.

    Kilometers 12-19

    It was only the downill and huge support that got me going. I was happy once I started running again to push a bit. It was a delicate balance here for the next few clickers to try and up the pace a wee bit, while also recovering from the previous 7 miles. I definitely wasn't pushing too strongly at this point and the quicker kilometers are owed largely to gravity.

    I was using Cliff Shot Bloks as my gels and it was only once the downhill started that I realised that the promised water at mile 6 hadn't materialised. I was so thirsty. A woman ahead asked a volunteer for water and he gave her what he had. I could see her offering it to people and was trying to catch up but couldn't. I noticed her leave it gently down, so that someone could pick it up if needed. There was only one person between me and that bottle and when I saw her pick it up, I actually whimpered. I watched as she finished the last drop and chucked the bottle away. I'm not going to lie, it was a tough moment!

    I decided after three quicker kilometers, just as the course began to level out, to pull back the pace a bit and try and get it closer to the planned 6:23 pace. I've never run a half marathon without blowing up and was really nervous. I focused on getting to 16 kilometers, which is always a big milestone for me in a half – only a parkrun to go, after all! Any time I saw the road rise in front of me, I'd get really nervous, but none of these hills bothered me. I was suffering, though. I tried to occupy myself to figure out what I needed to do to run a PB, any sort of mind trick at all. If anyone around me stopped, I tried to urge them on to run with me. On the road down towards the last roundabout, I spotted a top that I'd seen on the way out and it made me realise how long I'd been running for. Seeing that top the first time around seemed like a lifetime ago.

    Kilometers 19-21

    We turned into the country roads for the last few kilometers. I was feeling a bit ill - probably from the gels - and kept telling myself that it was okay to drop off the pace a bit. When we started to meet the runners who had finished long ago, I was so tempted to ask them for water. I had gotten so thirsty again. I should have kept the bottle from the last stop, which is what I did at Wexford, and it's what I'll do the next time bottles are available during a race. I felt like a zombie. Meeting runners who are on their way home after finishing never bothered me before, but I found it so, so tough this time. The narrowness of the lanes didn't help and I'd to weave quite a bit. I'd stopped looking at my watch a long time ago, maybe around the 16-kilometer mark. It was just a case of putting one foot in front of the other at a pace that was quick enough to make this torture end without being so quick as to tip my delicate tummy over the edge. The stitch was omnipresent but not as bad as when it forced me to walk. The longest kilometer was the 19th. It was just never ending. When we passed the 800 meters sign, it felt like a long way since the 20k marker. I was so glad to see the 13-mile sign and we turned the corner, even though the finish seemed a long way away, I started to pick it up a wee bit. The girl beside me had plenty left and she pushed on and I tried to stay with her. I fell over the line and stopped the watch at 2:13:01. I was fairly surprised by this. Chip time: 2:12:58. Previous PB was 2:15:42. Nearly a 3-minute PB but I couldn't help but feel somewhat deflated. I'm not sure if it's because of the two walking breaks or if it's the realisation that a sub-2 half will probably never be within my reach. It might even just be the exhaustion after running a pretty hard race while not 100%.

    Splits: 6:13; 6:19; 6:17; 6:14; 6:13: 6:07; 6:16; 6:22; 7:11; 6:17: 6:57; 5:54; 6:07; 6:08; 6:15; 6:20; 6:16; 6:15; 6:21; 6:18; 6:20; and 4:13

    Once I stopped, both calfs were threatening to cramp. It may have been for the best then that I walked in completely the opposite direction to where we were parked, so I ended up doing a decent cool down walk before sitting in the car for two hours.

    As rubbish as the day was, I've never experienced this level of carmaraderie from runners at a race. Overall, I think I actually liked the course. It's certainly not easy, but I think it's easier than the R'N'R. It's great to get the hills out of the way and the significant downhill in the immediate aftermath allows a nice bit of recovery. It's also a really nice location and I've never experienced anything like the support of the locals. I just don't know if there's a viable way to make it work.

    So, what next? I swore yesterday that I'd never race another half, unless it was in the build up to a marathon or something. I'm not sure how true this is, but I don't think it's a distance for me. I love 10ks and would really like to properly race a 10 mile. It's just, for me, personally, HMP is still pretty spicy. It feels tough from the outset and it's pretty daunting to have to maintain that for over 2 hours. Given that I pronounced earlier in the week that I wasn't even racing, I should probably refrain from making dramatic pronouncements on my log – but, I guess, that part of the function of a log is to record your feelings in real time.

    In the shorter term, I'll do a short recovery run later. My legs are feeling okay. Certainly in much better shape than after my two previous halfs, when I had to gently lower myself onto the loo for a few days. The quad is a wee bit tender. I might well take the week off running once that's done and try and get back into the yoga groove.

    And, then, I've Donadea in three weeks and RTL in November. The plan was always to focus on 5k for Jingle Bells. I'll have a wee think on what plan to follow and any suggestions would be welcome. I'm currently looking at either the P&L 5k plan or mixed distance plan. I'd started reading Jack Daniels and I'm sure he's great and all but he doesn't half go on!

    The other option is to just focus on lots on easy miles over the winter before starting a plan with Raheny in mind.

    Lots to look forward to!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,274 ✭✭✭ Swashbuckler


    Well done on a fantastic pb!

    Why on earth would you think sub 2hr is out of reach for you? With the right training it's 100% guaranteed you can. You have a great attitude which is 50% of the battle to begin with. Well done again. Keep in up!


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,989 ✭✭✭✭ The Muppet


    Huzzah! wrote: »
    I just read over all of your lovely words of encouragement and now I'm embarrassed :o

    So, maybe I should change my username to the girl who called wolf. I'm prone to chest infections and had to dropout of the GT5k last year when I was struck down with a bad one. When I had the warning symptoms, I thought the worst.

    I started to feel much better on Friday and the tightness was mostly gone from my chest, so I went out for a short recovery run. I felt okay on this but was still undecided on the half when the alarm went off this morning. I got up and ate breakfast with my OH, who was racing. I told him I wasn't racing but proceeded to get dressed and decided I'd make the trip to Newbridge House and see how I was feeling when I got there. And what a trip it was! Given the difficulties, I kind of thought it would be rude not to run and lined myself up between the 2:10 and 2:20 pacers. 2:15 was always the goal for this race (and has been since the first time I raced a half). I had briefly flirted with the idea of heading out with the 2:20 group and trying to pick it up, but didn't truly fancy the idea of leaving myself with that much work to do.

    Kilometers 1-5

    I headed off slightly too quickly and, to be perfectly honest, I felt cr*p from the start. The first small bump of a hill left me dreading the rest of the run. I was aiming for 6:23 splits and was hitting 6:15s approximately, but I didn't want to break my rhythm I'm not sure what happened at Lusk. I felt truly awful but my pace had picked up considerably. I struggled to slow down, despite the pace not agreeing with me. I just couldn't find a rhythm. I was worried that the 2:10 pacers were still well within sight. I stopped at the first water station and settled myself before heading on again at a more suitable pace.

    Kilometers 6-11

    A stitch was starting. I was hot. I was miserable. I spent most of this stretch wondering how I'd get back to Newbridge House if I quit. I was worried my other half would be worried if I stopped and it took me an age to get back to him. The pace was pretty okay through here until the stitch really took hold on a hill. I'm not sure where this hill was but I think it was around the 8th kilometer. A kind man stopped as he thought I was in distress. I'm really going to have to get something printed for the top I wear racing: “I'm okay; it's just a stitch”. Another man checked on me and someone offered me water. I was fairly frustrated at this point and I was embarrassed when people were stopping for me. I got rid of the stitch really quickly using the usual technique and started running again. I had to stop and walk again on the last big climb just before the Man O'War. I just didn't have the legs and when I realised that the last walk only set me back by about 30 seconds, I wasn't too concerned. The stitch was starting to bite again, anyway. Both of these walking segments slowed my time, but not as much as you'd think.

    Kilometers 12-19

    It was only the downill and huge support that got me going. I was happy once I started running again to push a bit. It was a delicate balance here for the next few clickers to try and up the pace a wee bit, while also recovering from the previous 7 miles. I definitely wasn't pushing too strongly at this point and the quicker kilometers are owed largely to gravity.

    I was using Cliff Shot Bloks as my gels and it was only once the downhill started that I realised that the promised water at mile 6 hadn't materialised. I was so thirsty. A woman ahead asked a volunteer for water and he gave her what he had. I could see her offering it to people and was trying to catch up but couldn't. I noticed her leave it gently down, so that someone could pick it up if needed. There was only one person between me and that bottle and when I saw her pick it up, I actually whimpered. I watched as she finished the last drop and chucked the bottle away. I'm not going to lie, it was a tough moment!

    I decided after three quicker kilometers, just as the course began to level out, to pull back the pace a bit and try and get it closer to the planned 6:23 pace. I've never run a half marathon without blowing up and was really nervous. I focused on getting to 16 kilometers, which is always a big milestone for me in a half – only a parkrun to go, after all! Any time I saw the road rise in front of me, I'd get really nervous, but none of these hills bothered me. I was suffering, though. I tried to occupy myself to figure out what I needed to do to run a PB, any sort of mind trick at all. If anyone around me stopped, I tried to urge them on to run with me. On the road down towards the last roundabout, I spotted a top that I'd seen on the way out and it made me realise how long I'd been running for. Seeing that top the first time around seemed like a lifetime ago.

    Kilometers 19-21

    We turned into the country roads for the last few kilometers. I was feeling a bit ill - probably from the gels - and kept telling myself that it was okay to drop off the pace a bit. When we started to meet the runners who had finished long ago, I was so tempted to ask them for water. I had gotten so thirsty again. I should have kept the bottle from the last stop, which is what I did at Wexford, and it's what I'll do the next time bottles are available during a race. I felt like a zombie. Meeting runners who are on their way home after finishing never bothered me before, but I found it so, so tough this time. The narrowness of the lanes didn't help and I'd to weave quite a bit. I'd stopped looking at my watch a long time ago, maybe around the 16-kilometer mark. It was just a case of putting one foot in front of the other at a pace that was quick enough to make this torture end without being so quick as to tip my delicate tummy over the edge. The stitch was omnipresent but not as bad as when it forced me to walk. The longest kilometer was the 19th. It was just never ending. When we passed the 800 meters sign, it felt like a long way since the 20k marker. I was so glad to see the 13-mile sign and we turned the corner, even though the finish seemed a long way away, I started to pick it up a wee bit. The girl beside me had plenty left and she pushed on and I tried to stay with her. I fell over the line and stopped the watch at 2:13:01. I was fairly surprised by this. Chip time: 2:12:58. Previous PB was 2:15:42. Nearly a 3-minute PB but I couldn't help but feel somewhat deflated. I'm not sure if it's because of the two walking breaks or if it's the realisation that a sub-2 half will probably never be within my reach. It might even just be the exhaustion after running a pretty hard race while not 100%.

    Splits: 6:13; 6:19; 6:17; 6:14; 6:13: 6:07; 6:16; 6:22; 7:11; 6:17: 6:57; 5:54; 6:07; 6:08; 6:15; 6:20; 6:16; 6:15; 6:21; 6:18; 6:20; and 4:13

    Once I stopped, both calfs were threatening to cramp. It may have been for the best then that I walked in completely the opposite direction to where we were parked, so I ended up doing a decent cool down walk before sitting in the car for two hours.

    As rubbish as the day was, I've never experienced this level of carmaraderie from runners at a race. Overall, I think I actually liked the course. It's certainly not easy, but I think it's easier than the R'N'R. It's great to get the hills out of the way and the significant downhill in the immediate aftermath allows a nice bit of recovery. It's also a really nice location and I've never experienced anything like the support of the locals. I just don't know if there's a viable way to make it work.

    So, what next? I swore yesterday that I'd never race another half, unless it was in the build up to a marathon or something. I'm not sure how true this is, but I don't think it's a distance for me. I love 10ks and would really like to properly race a 10 mile. It's just, for me, personally, HMP is still pretty spicy. It feels tough from the outset and it's pretty daunting to have to maintain that for over 2 hours. Given that I pronounced earlier in the week that I wasn't even racing, I should probably refrain from making dramatic pronouncements on my log – but, I guess, that part of the function of a log is to record your feelings in real time.

    In the shorter term, I'll do a short recovery run later. My legs are feeling okay. Certainly in much better shape than after my two previous halfs, when I had to gently lower myself onto the loo for a few days. The quad is a wee bit tender. I might well take the week off running once that's done and try and get back into the yoga groove.

    And, then, I've Donadea in three weeks and RTL in November. The plan was always to focus on 5k for Jingle Bells. I'll have a wee think on what plan to follow and any suggestions would be welcome. I'm currently looking at either the P&L 5k plan or mixed distance plan. I'd started reading Jack Daniels and I'm sure he's great and all but he doesn't half go on!

    The other option is to just focus on lots on easy miles over the winter before starting a plan with Raheny in mind.

    Lots to look forward to!

    Great report well done. Re the girl who cried wolf. I'd imagine most of us who log Publically feel like that from time to time, I certainly do , we shouldnt of course because in every race there can be a number of unknowns that will prevent you having the run you feel is in you or we can feel crap one day and better the next.


    Reading Jack Daniels myself at the moment, he does go on but it's good to help understand why running plans are designed as they are . It makes it easier to do the session if you understand why.

    The best of luck with the training and congrats on the PB.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,673 ✭✭✭ juke


    Well done for sticking it out when you weren't 100%. I too found the first 5-6k very warm/humid.

    It was a tough day - and you still PB'd - plenty to be proud of.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,864 ✭✭✭ ariana`


    Congrats on the new PB! It was a tough day on a tough course so you did really well :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,338 ✭✭✭ eyrie


    That's fantastic!!!! Well done you! You got a PB on a day when you very nearly didn't even race because you'd been feeling crap. I don't know why you'd say sub-2 is not on the cards - I see no reason why it wouldn't be achievable! Then again random time goals are way less meaningful than just running well, enjoying it, and feeling you've done yourself proud.
    Will be interested to see what plan you decide on next!


  • Registered Users Posts: 745 ✭✭✭ gypsylee


    What a great and honest race report to read. Well done on your PB in those conditions. You should be very proud.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,057 ✭✭✭ Bluesquare


    Well done on the race - great to have a pb . A sub 2 will be no bother to you . Maybe target a less challenging course ! I'm looking at bohermeen in march for a nice pb - I would highly recommend it - a very nice looped flat course.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,338 ✭✭✭ eyrie


    Bluesquare wrote: »
    I'm looking at bohermeen in march for a nice pb - I would highly recommend it - a very nice looped flat course.

    Oooh now this sounds interesting! I'm hoping to do a half in the first half of next year, and I like the sound of flat!

    (Sorry for hijacking Huzzah ;))


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Bluesquare wrote: »
    Well done on the race - great to have a pb . A sub 2 will be no bother to you . Maybe target a less challenging course ! I'm looking at bohermeen in march for a nice pb - I would highly recommend it - a very nice looped flat course.
    eyrie wrote: »
    Oooh now this sounds interesting! I'm hoping to do a half in the first half of next year, and I like the sound of flat!

    (Sorry for hijacking Huzzah ;))

    No worries - it was one on my hit list prior to my swearing off HMs for life ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,883 Younganne



    My principal goal for the rest of the year is to try and run a PB at the race
    series half. My current PB is from the Wexford half earlier this year and is
    2:15:4x

    great report and well done on the PB, you are well under the 2.14 you originally set as the target in your opening post of this log.

    that was a great run on a very tough course and you will work towards and obtain your sub 2. Keep up the great training.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,600 ✭✭✭ Annie get your Run


    Well done on a fantastic pb!

    Why on earth would you think sub 2hr is out of reach for you? With the right training it's 100% guaranteed you can. You have a great attitude which is 50% of the battle to begin with. Well done again. Keep in up!

    Big +1 to this!! Took me a few goes to get there too but with the right training you can absolutely do it. It's as much a mental block (if not more...) than a physical one. Congrats on your PB!! It was certainly hard earned, well done.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Thanks so much for taking the time to pop in with all of your kind words of wisdom. You're all correct: I achieved what I set out to when I started this plan three months ago. In fact, I more than achieved it. Any day that involves a PB is a good day. I hope I didn't come across as greedy :o I was just genuinely exhausted, I think.

    Sub-2 was never a goal and never even really a thought that had crossed my mind before. It always seemed quite far out of reach and maybe the run on Saturday just highlighted how far. That's not to say it's something that I won't work towards. If you'd have told me at the start of the year that I'd be running a 5k in the time that I have, I'd have laughed. For now, I'm happy to keep chipping away at my PBs with incremental improvements. It seems more and more that a lot of next year will be dedicated to DCM 2018 :eek: And achieving PBs might be secondary to that, at least for the second part of the year. But you know me: I'm nothing if not fickle and I could change my mind umpteen times before 2017 is out.

    Speaking of fickle: I'd mentioned in my previous post that I was going for a quick recovery and then not running for the week. I'd also mentioned that Donadea was in 3 weeks. Well, not running and an upcoming 10k didn't really make sense, especially when I'd not run much in the week before the half. I felt pretty good on the short recovery, better than I've ever felt after racing a half, and I resolved to try and follow the two-week plan provided by Pfitzinger for the fortnight after a race, which I did, kinda. The best laid plans of mice and men and all that:

    Day|Distance|Avg HR
    Sunday|2.5km|132
    Tuesday|5.71km|138
    Thursday|10km|136


    No run for the weekend. I can't run in the afternoons in Wexico and yesterday morning was spent pr volunteering. Today was spent lounging around in my jim jams :p


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Monday, October 2nd
    Total: 11k general aerobic (1:24:23)
    Avg Pace: 7:31 min/km
    Splits: 7:42; 7:32; 7:49; 7:30; 7:31; 7:22; 7:31; 7:20; 7:27; 7:13; 7:39; and 7:50
    Avg HR: 141 Max: 157

    Delighted with life heading out on this run. Was really looking forward to it and the air felt nice and fresh. Legs hadn’t caught up with my brain, though, (brain hadn’t caught up with my legs?), and they were quite heavy. I was also frozen by the time I got in. I’m a sensitive wee soul. I still enjoyed it. The fresh air did me good.

    Wednesday, October, 4th
    Total: 11km general aerobic (1:21:42)
    Avg Pace: 7:25 min/km
    Avg HR:
    140 Max HR: 162
    Splits: 7:31; 7:25; 7:24; 7:30; 7:18; 7:33; 7:36; 7:23; 7:14; 7:05; and 7:31
    The run I felt I should have had on Monday. Lovely fresh legs. Long-sleeved top meant I was immune to the wind and rain; in fact, I loved it. Nearly got blown away crossing the bridge over the M50.

    Thursday, October 7th
    Total: 5km general aerobic (36:31)
    Avg Pace: 7:13 min/km
    Avg HR: 143 Max HR: 163
    Splits: 7:31; 7:07; 7:02; 7:26; 7:01; and 6:51

    I had company on this run, which I rarely have, and I really enjoyed it. It was a wee bit faster than I’d usually run a general aerobic run, but the heart-rate range was broadly correct.

    Friday, October 6th
    Total:
    10km general aerobic (1:07:51)
    Avg Pace: 6:46 min/km
    Avg HR: 141 Max HR: 158
    Splits: 7:27; 6:58; 6:53; 6:31; 6:36; 6:28; 6:29; 6:36; 6:37; and 7:00

    General aerobic run into work, which explains the speedier pace. I had to keep reminding myself if wasn’t a recovery. I'm such a lazebag; I would quite happily pootle along at recovery pace all the time if I could get away with it. I love these runs into work. I get there quicker than when I run and feel nice and awake. Doesn’t mean it’s easy to motivate myself out the door, though!

    I was debating running a parkrun at full effort tomorrow, but I think a long run would stand me in better stead, so I’m going to do 16k, with a parkrun sandwiched in the middle.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,338 ✭✭✭ eyrie


    You're not exactly letting the grass grow under you after the half are you?? Fair play! Impressive to have gotten straight back into it, and with some fairly long midweek runs too.
    God I wish I loved the runs into work, I now want to move either my office or my home just to have a different route! Trouble for me is I live too close to work so I have to add on quite a loop to make running it worthwhile, or I'd be there in 15 minutes!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    eyrie wrote: »
    You're not exactly letting the grass grow under you after the half are you?? Fair play! Impressive to have gotten straight back into it, and with some fairly long midweek runs too.
    God I wish I loved the runs into work, I now want to move either my office or my home just to have a different route! Trouble for me is I live too close to work so I have to add on quite a loop to make running it worthwhile, or I'd be there in 15 minutes!

    I just HATE the BUS! I'm really surprised myself at how quickly I recovered after the half. I'm certainly much fitter than I was even five months ago. The prospect of Donadea has kept me honest, too.

    I should clarify: I love running into work once it's done or even once I'm underway. Getting out of bed and then out the door was still a lot harder than it would be if I was just running in the evening. I also wore two tshirts and it's not even cold yet, so I'm not sure how long the morning runmuting will last :P


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Saturday, 7 October
    Total: 16kms
    Avg pace: [email protected]:32; [email protected]:31; and [email protected]:13
    Avg HR: [email protected]/172; [email protected]/187; and [email protected]/162
    Splits: 7:04; 7:01; 6:57; 7:14; 7:04; 7:24: 7:01; 7:21; 5:23; 5:15; 5:45; 5:49; 5:21; 7:02; 7:09; 7:10; 7:30

    This was more about getting it done rather than enjoying it. I felt a bit off from the start. My legs were tired and the effort felt a bit much. Of course, I could've eased off on pace a bit, but I sometimes find this hard to do when in a rythym. There is nothing about the heart-rate levels to suggest the effort was too much, anyway. I was delighted to get a parkrun in, but, in hindsight, I should've had more of a plan for what pace I was going to run it at. Maybe planned 10-k pace or a tempo or something, but it's done now. Stitches were a constant issue, too. Anyway, I enjoyed it more as the run progressed and was delighted to have my weekend's running done and dusted by 10.30 on a Saturday morning.

    53 kilometers for the week. Onto 5k training next week. I've decided once and for all, as I kind of knew I would, on the Faster Road Running 5k lowest-mileage plan. The goal race will be the Tom Brennan 5k. Jingle Bells will slot in nicely as a tune-up race, which could well mean I run a faster tune up than goal race, but oh well! There's no firm goal in mind yet, but as close to 25 minutes as possible would be nice :o


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Monday, October 9th
    Plan: General Aerobic 10km, including 6x12 sec uphill and 6x100m strides
    Total: 13k Endurance (1:31:47)
    Avg Pace: 7:02 min/km
    Splits: 7:13; 7:32; 7:02; 7:13; 7:18; 7:00; 7:07; 6:33; 6:38; 6:29; 6:26; 6:56; and 7:52
    Avg HR:
    152 Max: 171

    Swapped my runs around a bit this week but looking at it now, this would’ve been fine to do on the Tuesday :P I updated my paces based on my recent 5k PB and I certainly noticed the difference. The effort was fine, though. I didn’t quite hit the require paces for the second part, but I think the average was right. Doesn’t matter, anyway. No doubt it just takes a small bit of getting used to. (I’ve been reading the thread about rest being the new sport, can you tell?!)

    Tuesday, October 10th
    Plan:
    13km Endurance
    Total: 10km general aerobic (1:16:02) plus wee 2.8k pre-10k session-type thing (19:50)
    Avg Pace: 7:35 min/km plus 7:04min/km
    Avg HR: 140 Max HR: 156
    Splits: 7:35; 8:00; 7:27; 7:38; 7:26; 7:37; 7:36; 7:22; 7:32; and 7:34

    I felt I was “racing” when I started out. It’s easy to do when you’re runmuting as the quicker you run, the quicker you’re home. I fall into bad habits when I’m not on a plan and had been getting progressively faster on my runs over the past couple of weeks. Now that I’m back on plan, it’s time to put the kibosh on that, so I really concentrated on slowing down or, more precisely, reducing the effort a bit. Felt really good and I think the effort was spot on.

    Once I got home, I decided to do a wee session. It’s one that Testosterscone prescribed on a recent graduates thread. I’ve used it a fair bit and I really like to do it the week of a race. It’s one, two, three, two, one minutes at planned race pace with equal recoveries. Happy enough with how it went.

    Wednesday, September 6th
    No plan.
    Total: 4.4km recovery (35:53)
    Avg Pace: 8:15min/km
    Avg HR: 131 Max HR: 157
    Splits: 7:44; 7:56; 8:10; 8:56 (ah here); and 8:44

    I tried to be really disciplined about the effort on this and I was, with my heart rate staying in the 120s when the aim was to keep it below 140, until the fourth kilometer when for no reason that I can fathom, my heart rate went bonkers, so it was more of a run-walk :confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,787 ✭✭✭ Huzzah!


    Chip time: 59:07
    Splits: 5:32; 5:47; 5:43; 5:44; 6:23; 6:02; 6:00; 6:16; 6:11; and 5:43

    My 10k PB of 56:42 was set earlier this year at the Fingal 10k. My average pace during that run was 5:38 per kilometer, so I decided to try a pace of 5:35 per kilometer at Donadea. Well, we can see how that worked out :o I'm not sure where it all went wrong yesterday, but I knew pretty much from the off that it wasn't going to work out. In fact, last week's parkrun effort felt way harder than it should and perhaps that should have been an indication that a conservative start would've been more appropriate yesterday, but I don't really know.

    I got to Donadea in plenty of time. It's a lovely place and the atmosphere was friendly and welcoming. It almost felt like a parkrun. I jog/walked down to the start line and lined up between the 60-minute and 55-minute pacers. We set off without much fanfare and it all felt fine. The first hill was unexpected, but I kept an even effort and coasted down the other side. I ended up running in a group here and they parted to let me through. They passed me at some point, but I'm not sure when. I wonder if I'd stayed with them, would I have finished more comfortably? I felt like I was in an okay rythym as we entered the park but, to be honest, I was really hot and the effort felt a bit too much. I remembered that the effort felt hot from the getgo in Fingal, so I was content to keep going, but I knew I couldn't run any faster, despite the fact that I was quite far off the pace I wanted to run. And then, of course, a stitch hit, and sure why wouldn't it? :mad:I slowed to a walk and did my usual huffing and puffing but it didn't fully disappear. Once I stopped, both my calves started to cramp, but the cramps never took hold. I started running again once I got to the top of a small hill but the pace kept slipping and there was nothing I could do about it. I switched the face on my watch to heart rate and forgot about time. I was struggling, though, and I kept battling the urge to not only walk but DNF. It helped that I hadn't a bod's notion where I was. When I was near the end, I thought I was close to 9k but when I realised I was only at the 8k mark, I may have shed a tear or two. I'd started to get a stitch in my shoulder at this point, which was just unnecessary :rolleyes: I was running with a lady now. I'd pass her on the hills and she'd catch me up on the downhills/flat. It was nice having someone to run with and it encouraged me to keep running. Someone told us at the 8.5k mark that it was all downhill from there but I wasn't able to take advantage. With maybe about 800 meters to go, Ciara Mageean was running against us, looking as cool as a cumcumber. She shouted encouragement at us, telling us we were near the end and that we were looking strong. Nice of her to say so, but I was a wreck. Still, not every day that something like that happens. Once the finish line came into sight, I was able to pick it up and finished with a decent kick.

    Takeaways? I'm not sure I have any. I don't know where that dismal performance came out of, but I never gave up trying. We can't win them all, so I'm just going to chalk it down and move on. I'm not used to running on that type of surface, but I was struggling with the pace while still on the roads, so that wasn't the reason. My lower back isn't in the best shape now. It was spasming a wee bit in the car after the run, so I'll have to keep an eye on that. I actually think I'm overall a wee bit sorer today than I was the day after the half. I'll stick to the distance in the plan for tomorrow and Tuesday, but I'll keep it all easy. If everything is back feeling okay on Thursday, I'll do the session as planned. I'm not hugely disappointed but I have a niggling concern about continuing on the 5k plan. I'll see how the next few weeks go before making any decisions.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,137 El Caballo


    The humidity yesterday and Friday was freakish for this time of year, I found moving around at work difficult enough nevermind trying to race. Yesterday morning was 19° with humidity in the 90's. Pretty much as horrific as you will ever get in October. I remember running the DCM in 2014 in 18° and high 80's humidity and marathon pace felt like Half pace. A 10k in those conditions is probably even harder.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,044 ✭✭✭ chickey2


    Huzzah! wrote: »
    Chip time: I don't know where that dismal performance came out of, but I never gave up trying. We can't win them all, so I'm just going to chalk it down and move on.

    Sounds like good advice! Sorry to hear it didn't go to plan but it makes the pb's sweeter when they come.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,600 ✭✭✭ Annie get your Run


    El Caballo wrote: »
    The humidity yesterday and Friday was freakish for this time of year, I found moving around at work difficult enough nevermind trying to race. Yesterday morning was 19° with humidity in the 90's. Pretty much as horrific as you will ever get in October. I remember running the DCM in 2014 in 18° and high 80's humidity and marathon pace felt like Half pace. A 10k in those conditions is probably even harder.

    Ditto :(. My HR on yesterday's parkrun was up in the high 170's and I barely managed to finish it under 30 mins - way off my normal pace/effort & HR levels. Humidity is a killer for (most) runners. Well done for not giving up, that will stand to you when you smash your next race in better conditions!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,338 ✭✭✭ eyrie


    Sounds like a rotten day out there for a race, so well done on keeping going when the dark thoughts started creeping in! Seems like there were a fair few contributing factors.
    As you say yourself, we can't have an amazing experience every race, some of them are just a slog. But it's those ones where you want to quit but force yourself on that strengthen the mental side, or so I tell myself anyway! It'll stand to you next time :)
    Hope the soreness is fading


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,864 ✭✭✭ ariana`


    It sounds like a tough day at the office, well done for persevering and finishing it out and still sub 60.

    10ks are tough, i'd try to schedule 2 of them 3-4 weeks apart if possibly next time because i think you can take a lot of lessons from the 1st one.

    I did the same one in 2014 & again 2016 and i was disappointed both times, it's a local one, i run the route regularly and it's flat so no excuses for me really.

    This year i did the same one and was again disappointed but i followed it up with a different one about 3 weeks later and i was thrilled with how it went, i knocked a serious chunk off the PB and just felt pacing in general went better.

    Maybe the route or the 'local' factor doesn't suit me but i think it did help that going into the 2nd one i had a conservative start because my expectations were low from the previous one and then it just clicked and each km was faster than the previous one.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,221 ✭✭✭ Murph_D


    Plenty of others struggled in the Donadea forest too apparently. HBS likened it to the jungle. ironic really - last time I raced there it was cold enough to freeze your proverbials off. Yep. Chalk it up and look to the next thing!


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