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What Concerns You Most?

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,640 Homer01


    Thought this could be interesting to pass the time.

    What concerns you most about joining the PSNI?

    Shift work, dangerous work environment, carrying a firearm, the uniform, the exams?

    For me it would be the work / life balance. I have a family and currently live a pretty easy 9-5 life. I'm concerned I'd miss things at home and other life events. Staying on way past your finish time or having rest days cancelled cannot be good for any family.

    I'm going in with my eyes wide open but these would be my main concerns if I get that far.

    Come on don't be shy; show us that there are people out there :)


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Comments



  • Homer01 wrote: »
    Thought this could be interesting to pass the time.

    What concerns you most about joining the PSNI?

    Shift work, dangerous work environment, carrying a firearm, the uniform, the exams?

    For me it would be the work / life balance. I have a family and currently live a pretty easy 9-5 life. I'm concerned I'd miss things at home and other life events. Staying on way past your finish time or having rest days cancelled cannot be good for any family.

    I'm going in with my eyes wide open but these would be my main concerns if I get that far.

    Come on don't be shy; show us that there are people out there :)
    Same as Homer but also compounded by the fact I am one of those 25% who applied, I am from a strong nationalist area and now also live in another strong nationalist area...although beside 2 currently serving a number of years...so hopefully we are our own best security!




  • Homer01 wrote: »
    Thought this could be interesting to pass the time.

    What concerns you most about joining the PSNI?

    Shift work, dangerous work environment, carrying a firearm, the uniform, the exams?

    For me it would be the work / life balance. I have a family and currently live a pretty easy 9-5 life. I'm concerned I'd miss things at home and other life events. Staying on way past your finish time or having rest days cancelled cannot be good for any family.

    I'm going in with my eyes wide open but these would be my main concerns if I get that far.

    Come on don't be shy; show us that there are people out there :)

    I'm the same as Homer and being a Mum I think it will be hard to miss family milestones!!!




  • Turning your car key on the morning you forget to check under the car.

    Be interested to hear from the serving officers in here how seriously they take things like this?




  • Turning your car key on the morning you forget to check under the car.

    Be interested to hear from the serving officers in here how seriously they take things like this?

    Trust me, you never forget to check under your car. Only complacency and sheer stupidity will make you decide "it'll not happen to me". The threat is very real, even as a student officer you should begin the routine of checking every time




  • Same. I have a young child and I'm married to a serving officer. I know it's going to be tough on family life with two of us in the job but I know plenty of couples with children who manage it.

    Im dreading night shifts as I'm currently 9-5, have a great work life balance and childcare is easy. Not so sure how we'll manage given the varying shift pattern.

    My husband checks his and my car religiously, anytime we leave the house- something I have had to start doing when he's not around as we use each other's cars regularly.


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  • I have a fear of not being intellectual to pass through the exams in GV, with the whole cheating scandal I believe things will be a lot harder now. I think it is more a fear of the unknown and that everyone will have a degree in criminology and I will be the runt of the litter!

    My other worry is in social events when you get asked "oh, what do you do for a living?" on what I will say, what if they're super nosy?




  • D4z wrote: »
    I have a fear of not being intellectual to pass through the exams in GV, with the whole cheating scandal I believe things will be a lot harder now. I think it is more a fear of the unknown and that everyone will have a degree in criminology and I will be the runt of the litter!

    My other worry is in social events when you get asked "oh, what do you do for a living?" on what I will say, what if they're super nosy?

    Don't worry about exams and being 'smart' enough. If you've gotten this far, you've got what it takes. I've never been very good at exams but still passed mine. It just takes effort to study.

    When it comes to social situations, you'll have a cover story before you join. Make it believable and something that you're able to talk about to some extent. It'll get you through those awkward moments in the barbershop no problems.




  • D4z wrote: »
    I have a fear of not being intellectual to pass through the exams in GV, with the whole cheating scandal I believe things will be a lot harder now. I think it is more a fear of the unknown and that everyone will have a degree in criminology and I will be the runt of the litter!

    My other worry is in social events when you get asked "oh, what do you do for a living?" on what I will say, what if they're super nosy?

    You've got this far and in the top of the merit pool so you'll be fine. I'm sure we'll all struggle at one point or another but we're all in it together for the next 35 years if we're lucky.




  • The checking under your car thing for me is interesting, surely once your neighbours have seen you do it more than once they won't take very long to work out what you do. Better to be open and honest with them?




  • That's what I was thinking... dunno about being open and honest with them but there's only so many times you can "drop your keys"


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  • So what exactly would a 'device' under your car look like and where would it be positioned?




  • blueboat wrote: »
    So what exactly would a 'device' under your car look like and where would it be positioned?

    You'll be taught all about it in GV. By the time you leave you'll have seen more IED's and UVIED's than you'll ever have wanted to lol




  • Interesting thread. I think for me its the work-family balance, leaving loved ones at times of the year like Christmas or doing night shifts and passing them by for days on end. I guess that's just a sacrafise that comes with the job, I'm guessing though it just becomes part of life after a while.




  • Also the work/family life balance has me a bit worried. Understandably very little information about shift patterns, working hours is given. And I don't know anyone in the job to give me any more info.




  • Re the under car checks personally I always let on I'm religiously checking my tyre tread, allows me to check all 4 wheel arches with a quick peek under the back and main body of the vehicle...pain when it's wet right enough. But on the plus side you'll be sure to notice if a tyre is getting bald!




  • Re the under car checks personally I always let on I'm religiously checking my tyre tread, allows me to check all 4 wheel arches with a quick peek under the back and main body of the vehicle...pain when it's wet right enough. But on the plus side you'll be sure to notice if a tyre is getting bald!
    That's a good way to do it. I do the same thing. I don't worry about neighbours or anyone seeing as that way you become less of an easy target if that makes sense.




  • Getting closer to call time (hopefully) just wondering some of the things around easing family fears, cause no doubt they will arise when tell them. Some of the things might be explained at induction process, but additional insight would be great.

    1. How did you tell your parents/family
    2. How did it go down? (good, bad)
    3. How did you reassure them about both your own security and their's more important?
    4. How has daily life been (i.e. visiting home and having to check under your car in front of parents)

    Any other issues




  • Nerves2016 wrote: »
    Getting closer to call time (hopefully) just wondering some of the things around easing family fears, cause no doubt they will arise when tell them. Some of the things might be explained at induction process, but additional insight would be great.

    1. How did you tell your parents/family
    2. How did it go down? (good, bad)
    3. How did you reassure them about both your own security and their's more important?
    4. How has daily life been (i.e. visiting home and having to check under your car in front of parents)

    Any other issues

    Nerves, don't fret. Everyone's family will undoubtedly have concerns even if it weren't the PSNI you were joining. In terms of your questions, here's my experience.

    1) My parents knew I was applying from the outset and were very supportive. All I ever wanted to do was join the police so they were happy for me.

    2) my dad was fine with me joining, my mum and sisters though were not so keen. My mum especially was worried given the threat level. At my graduation George Hamilton was speaking with my family and my mum raised this concern. Essentially his reply was not to worry. We are highly trained and highly equipped to protect ourselves on duty. Unlike mainland forces we never do single officer patrolling and there are always resources nearby to back us up if we need it. This seemed to somewhat help her.

    3) my family don't live in NI so I can't really help there other than reiterate that I take my own personal security very serious. I always check my vehicle and am aware of my surroundings. It's about the best thing you can do.

    4) my family being military were used to checking under their car while they were here so that was not new. Things are different for me as my family live back in England and I don't see them much. Shift work will take its toll on your personal and family life but you just have to make an effort to utilise your time correctly

    Hope this may offer some help




  • Just fancied a bit of info on how people are telling their families, now that recruitment hopefully will recommence it's getting closer to that time...

    How do you plan to tell them or how did you?

    How do you expect they will take it?

    What will you do if they take it badly and ask you to stop and reconsider?

    I'm not expecting my family to take it very well but it's something I feel very strongly about and hope they will adapt and not think any different of me.




  • Are NIFRS recruiting anytime soon?


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  • Just fancied a bit of info on how people are telling their families, now that recruitment hopefully will recommence it's getting closer to that time...

    How do you plan to tell them or how did you?

    How do you expect they will take it?

    What will you do if they take it badly and ask you to stop and reconsider?

    I'm not expecting my family to take it very well but it's something I feel very strongly about and hope they will adapt and not think any different of me.
    My family know and so do some friends of mine. But I know they can be trusted. My family are all up for it and glad it's going ahead. But where I am from it's not really a major issue. As long as you look after your own security all is good. Hopefully your family will support you in anything that you do and encourage you to do the best and what is right for yourself. It's your life and if it's something you want. Don't let anything out you off




  • Nothing will put me off, not now. I think they will support me, no matter how they feel about it, I think once I'm in it would be fine.




  • Out of interest, what is it you think will make them be unhappy for you? I know there are general fears due to the nature of the job but I'm interested to see what puts people off?




  • In my case, i know the security factor is their biggest concern (and ability to stay/go home from time to time) - mainly my parents




  • Same as nerves but being from the Belfast area my family grew up during troubles and haven't had the greatest experiences with the police force. They've nothing necessarily against the police though, it's mainly the security and threat level.




  • My personal fear is the work/life balance. Both me and the other half are keen to start a family once we have our **** together lol. Dont want to miss milestones etc.

    Family are very supportive. Other half not so much.




  • A health work/life balance is hard to maintain. Shift work, overtime and the general exhaustion of the job all play their part. It's hard at first but you get used to it and learn how to make the most of the time you have




  • The shooting tonight doesn't help much in reassuring the family! Glad the officer is alright!




  • My new concern is that recruits from 2017 onwards will be viewed differently from those who went through GV previously. As if the current training is somehow less worthy than before.

    Things change and these recent changes may have been a long time coming. I'm sure the same was said with the change from RUC to PSNI but they all put the uniform on one leg at a time and take the same risks on the job.
    I've never been to GV but I hope to get there and if I do I hope my fellow officers will not view me as any less than them because I didn't bull boots or have show parades; it wasn't a choice I had.

    A police college shouldn't be a place of high pressure and fear of failure. It should be an environment of learning and support. A place where students can make mistakes and learn from them without the eyes of world upon them. It shouldn't apologise for being a safe place. GV is only the start of your training; they don't expect perfect policemen and policemenwomen out the door. That is why you have another two years of probationary learning in the field.

    If I can spend more time learning how to help the community and protect lives then I'll take it.
    Correct me if I'm wrong but the majority of day to day policing is not terrorism related. It's about domestic abuse, anti social behaviour and many other issues that affect lives every day. I want to know how to deal with these issues professionally and with respect to help others and grow respect for the police. If bulling boots and show parades help then I'm all for it, if detracts from it then scrap it.

    'Train hard, fight easy'


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  • Homer01 wrote: »
    My new concern is that recruits from 2017 onwards will be viewed differently from those who went through GV previously. As if the current training is somehow less worthy than before.

    Things change and these recent changes may have been a long time coming. I'm sure the same was said with the change from RUC to PSNI but they all put the uniform on one leg at a time and take the same risks on the job.
    I've never been to GV but I hope to get there and if I do I hope my fellow officers will not view me as any less than them because I didn't bull boots or have show parades; it wasn't a choice I had.

    A police college shouldn't be a place of high pressure and fear of failure. It should be an environment of learning and support. A place where students can make mistakes and learn from them without the eyes of world upon them. It shouldn't apologise for being a safe place. GV is only the start of your training; they don't expect perfect policemen and policemenwomen out the door. That is why you have another two years of probationary learning in the field.

    If I can spend more time learning how to help the community and protect lives then I'll take it.
    Correct me if I'm wrong but the majority of day to day policing is not terrorism related. It's about domestic abuse, anti social behaviour and many other issues that affect lives every day. I want to know how to deal with these issues professionally and with respect to help others and grow respect for the police. If bulling boots and show parades help then I'm all for it, if detracts from it then scrap it.

    'Train hard, fight easy'

    Fair points well made Homer!


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