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  • rhapsody wrote: »
    Thanks for that! I'm going to the NLI this week, so I was more wondering which papers to order. You could search for James Fay- his death cert says he had the accident on June 27th, and died on July 4th. It was registered in the North Dublin district- though I can't make out the name of the hospital. Thanks again.

    Did a quick search but didn't find anything at Find My Past.
    The hospital he died in looks to me like Jervis Street Hospital.
    Also, the death record mentions an enquiry held by the Dublin City coroner - it's possible that the enquiry got a mention in the papers.




  • Does anyone know where I could find information about inquests into deaths?




  • AFAIK Coroners' inquests are in the National Archives.
    When searching newspapers online for a specific event I've found it more effective to be 'fuzzy' as an event often was picked up and republished elsewhere, often quite far away. For example, I've not found an article when searching in the Limerick Chronicle, yet I've picked it up in an English paper with an attribution to the Chron. that enabled me to go back to the Chronicle and 'manually' search a few issues - with success.




  • Anything in the Budget to interest us? Funding for the NL or NA for example? Anyone hear anything?




  • I started doing this research a few weeks ago in the evenings just using the GRO and 1901/1911 Census information available online. I'm originally from Galway but living in the US, all my immediate family are still there but they're amazed at what I've been able to unearth from here. The biggest find(I mentioned this in the other thread) was Army Pension application records for my grand-uncle who died young in 1923. Found 128 pages(yes!) on various back and forths between the department of defence and my grand aunt(his sister) plus solicitors. I haven't even read through all that stuff yet.
    I've traced back to my great-great-great grandfather(b 1808) on my father's side and great-great-grandfather(b 1815) on my mother's side. I think I've gone are far as I can upwards in the tree for GRO info available online so I might tackle the church records and grittiths next.

    I know this can be all consuming but what at point do you stop? The boundaries seem limitless. I find myself looking up the kids of my great-great grand uncles.

    Also what is a good site for keeping track of the tree? I'm using myheritage.com and found it pretty good so far.


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  • FatherTed wrote:
    I know this can be all consuming but what at point do you stop? The boundaries seem limitless. I find myself looking up the kids of my great-great grand uncles.


    It depends on how much of a completist you wish to be. I don't bother with siblings of any generations beyond my grandparents; I just don't have any interest in them.

    I love finding the locations of where my ancestors lived and then visiting them. I actually have a labelled collection of small sealed jars which contain the soil of each location (townland).

    Btw - as much as you can find online, that available not online opens up many new doors eg estate records, to name just one.




  • FatherTed wrote: »
    I know this can be all consuming but what at point do you stop?.......

    I began writing things down in the 1960's. Left it and then went back to it when some bright spark invented computers and the wonderful world wide web!! For me it has never stopped, it just slows down.




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    I actually have a labelled collection of small sealed jars which contain the soil of each location (townland).

    I had to chime in when I read this. That is brilliant.




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    ....I actually have a labelled collection of small sealed jars which contain the soil of each location (townland)...

    A step too far for me I fear! I've enuff stuff genealogical without adding more pedological elements! :D




  • I love history, especially social history. I walk around the area, imagining them doing the same x years ago. When I find (as I have) an actual building I'm ecstatic! Mostly they're now animal sheds or storage but that's ok, at least they're standing. Before I go I take a small airtight jar, fill it with a handful of soil, take it home and label it with place and ancestor. I then write a short description of the area in a journal, and some thoughts on my day.

    It just makes it personal, connects me in some small way to them other than DNA. :)


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  • mod9maple wrote: »
    I love history, especially sociological history. I walk around the area, imagining them doing the same x years ago. When I find (as I have) an actual building I'm ecstatic! Mostly they're now animal sheds or storage but that's ok, at least they're standing. Before I go I take a small airtight jar, fill it with a handful of soil, take it home and label it with place and ancestor. I then write a short description of the area in a journal, and some thoughts on my day.

    It just makes it personal, connects me in some small way to them other than DNA. :)

    I can of course appreciate that. But what makes me ecstatic is photos! Oooh I do love photos and when I come across any I haven't seen before I'm like a kid on Christmas morning!




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    I don't bother with siblings of any generations beyond my grandparents; I just don't have any interest in them.

    That's surprising to me. Personally, I make every effort to find out who each of my ancestor's siblings are. It makes it easier to find out if you are related to someone you just met or if you are doing further investigation into naming patterns and also it's fun to know if your ancestor was the eldest or the youngest in the family or somewhere in the middle. :)




  • Alan259 wrote:
    That's surprising to me.


    Actually I should qualify my statement. I do the bare minimum on them for the reasons you mentioned. But I wouldn't, for eg, research their children in detail as regards say occupations, or tenancies. I'm much more interested in direct ancestors; I'm very into my parental tree. With 8 gr-g'parents and 16 gr-gr-g'parents, and some of 32 etc etc, that's more than enough to be getting on with.




  • There's no end.

    I spent 5 hours on Sunday researching people with the same surname as my grandfather's family who are probably not related. I'd sketched it out a few years ago from indexes but now with the registers, it's a 5 generation tree with 51 people including people still alive. They had some great surnames that I couldn't resist.

    I fully acknowledge my addiction, which is the first step to recovery.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • pinkypinky wrote: »
    ...the first step to recovery.

    THERE IS NO RECOVERY!!!:pac::pac::pac:




  • Hermy wrote: »
    THERE IS NO RECOVERY!!!:pac::pac::pac:

    While there is discovery, there will never be recovery!




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    Actually I should qualify my statement. I do the bare minimum on them for the reasons you mentioned. But I wouldn't, for eg, research their children in detail as regards say occupations, or tenancies. I'm much more interested in direct ancestors; I'm very into my parental tree. With 8 gr-g'parents and 16 gr-gr-g'parents, and some of 32 etc etc, that's more than enough to be getting on with.

    Personally, I do go into the detail with their children as it just gets to interesting for me to stop. :D I'v found that someone will have married a semi-famous person or have a semi-famous grandchild, etc. :D




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    I actually have a labelled collection of small sealed jars which contain the soil of each location (townland).
    .

    I'd not get away with it if the wall looked anything like this?:)




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    I love history, especially social history. I walk around the area, imagining them doing the same x years ago. When I find (as I have) an actual building I'm ecstatic! Mostly they're now animal sheds or storage but that's ok, at least they're standing. Before I go I take a small airtight jar, fill it with a handful of soil, take it home and label it with place and ancestor. I then write a short description of the area in a journal, and some thoughts on my day.

    It just makes it personal, connects me in some small way to them other than DNA. :)

    I love this! I'm so jealous. All of my lot (except 1 gg grandmother) are Dublin City back to 1820s/1830s so very hard to get a sense of place or buildings other than OSI maps etc. So few surviving buildings never mind soil :(




  • Tomorrow/Saturday morning Bobby Kerr Newstalk business programme 10-12. One of the topics is ‘the business of genealogy’ - a discussion with someone from Ancestry.com.


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  • The programme will have the usual podcast. The slot on genealogy starts about 30 minutes in and lasts for about 10 minutes.
    Kerr’s main interlocuteur was Joe Buggy (a periodic poster here) who came across very well. Nothing major discussed – there was mention of the usefulness of Ancestry’s online public trees (but no health warning) and it traced a bit of Kerr’s ancestry back to the 1800’s. One of Kerr’s ggfathers studied medicine and also went on to study in Edinburgh – Buggy mentioned that Ancestry recently put medical directories on-line. Reference to DNA (lightweight) - this seems to be a ‘big push’ item for Ancestry, with kits being available for purchase at the RDS show, no price mentioned.

    Perhaps because my background is in a very heavily regulated industry I get irritated by imprecise claims – e.g. in a piece on Irish geno research ‘We now have more than 2 million DNA records’ is IMO quite misleading, when that amount is for worldwide.

    Overall it did not do much for geneology, but was a good advert for Ancestry and for a 10 minute slot it achieved a lot (no doubt helped by good presenters & good editing!)




  • I heard it on my way out this morning and that's a good summary Pedro.

    Joe: you sounded great.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • Thanks to Leck, (see Geno events thread) the freebie texted entry worked well for me today when I called to the Geno show. It is off in a side-hall, the main event is the 55plus thingy. I did the Geno event in less than an hour this afternoon (Friday). Comments below relate to the Geno show.

    Pinky, I called by IGRS, hatless, winked at everyone in sight (except your guy from Bristol) to no avail and was made welcome. Pity you were not there, but he did sign me up……

    It was worth going to*, particularly if attending the lectures that are pertinent. However, as an event it was terribly, awfully, amateurish. The worst was the organization. Shame on the organizers to allow a 'concert' of excessively loud music (some sort of 1916 commemoration?) blast over the entire hall area. People on stands literally had to stop talking to customers while some off-key (flat) singer spouted maudlin rubbish. The spaces between some aisles were too narrow, and some stands were staffed by people who had absolutely no exhibition experience or interest. Others had pleasant staff who had no idea - i.e. they were not properly trained. FTM/Ancestry with big stands need to get their collective act together on what is happening with their recent ownership/IT changes. Some stands had staff who clearly had never manned a stand before – ever - and just sat sulking in corners or talking to each other. Why bother? (One stand – I will not shame them – was not even manned!) Ancestry.com had lots of space/terminals with free search facilities, (v. poor stand layout for customer flow) and there were long unmoving queues to access terminals. I did not bother (they need to enforce on-terminal time limits). FTM had a big stand also, their staff tried to be helpful, were nice/smiley, but lacked training.

    The most disappointing thing was that more than half the Geno exhibition space was taken up by tat – and I mean tat, old geezers in woolly jumpers/fleeces selling coins mainly, a few medals, some selling postcards, and others selling third-hand genealogy books that were long out of date. (What use is a 20+ year-old edition of Grenham, even if it is only €3? Or back issues of some geno magazine from the 1990’s, even at 3 for a fiver? )

    I did (finally) the Y-DNA 37 test on-site….. American outfit, jeez did their professionalism stand out! Apart from them (American lady), the best customer experience BY FAR was my interaction with the RDS parking attendants in Simmonscourt. Friendly, polite, efficient, interested. Big contrast.

    *It was worth going to because on entry I had a white bag thrust at me by a harassed girl who waved at a pallet of multivitamin capsules / pills saying ‘Take one.’ She then turned away, she didn’t seem to care that the boxes were shrink-wrapped in packs of three, so I took one, a pack. Gave them to herself when I got home (she's pleased). I also now feel very sprightly, having been able to stroll past walking aids, home-care offers, crutches and assisted holiday tours. And that is without touching the capsules!




  • Good review pedro. Slightly less disappointed now that I won't be able to make it.




  • Sorry to miss you Pedro - I did hear about it in dispatches. I was there for a few hours today and then left to attend a family gathering.

    I will be there all day tomorrow, for my sins.

    I think your summary is excellent, and over pints in real life, I will give my opinions from the POV of someone taking a stand at the event.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • Last night my partner had a dream about her ancestors including someone going to America and a photo album with locks of hair attached.
    Does anyone know where I can find out more about this as she can't remember any names, dates or places?




  • Hermy wrote: »
    Last night my partner had a dream about her ancestors including someone going to America and a photo album with locks of hair attached.
    Does anyone know where I can find out more about this as she can't remember any names, dates or places?

    Is this satire Hermy? Am I missing something?

    If serious, ahem, a hypnotist? :eek:




  • Well it sounded funny when I typed it.:o




  • My ears don't have the same sense of humour as your ears do! :D:D I was mystified too.

    I went along to the show and yes I agree, all those coin collector stands were taking up a lot of space. I did stop to consult staff on a stand when I noticed a particular piece of information on a table and they gave me contact information for someone I wanted to contact. Other than that I didn't really get much else out of it as I'm not a beginner at genealogy, however, I felt it was assumed that anyone approaching a stand was a beginner, but then a lot of beginners turn up at these events so it was good for them. Probably not for the likes of a lot of us here though. I was very surprised that they had musical interludes on an event list in the same area. Who the heck thought that the genealogy or even collectors area was the best place for that!! Some sprog thought us wrinklies would love it I suppose.


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  • I think the mistake people are making here is thinking that the genealogy section had the coins and "tat" included in it, when in fact, they were just adjacent. The genealogy section was really just 25 stands at the front of the Industries Hall.

    Genealogy Forum Mod



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