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Is there ever a whole sunny day in Ireland?

  • 06-04-2016 4:32pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭ armabelle


    I know the weather in Ireland is bad but I didn't know it was going to be so bad and being new here (arrived in Jan) I have not seen one whole sunny day except for once about 6 weeks ago when it was cold as hell and it was only one day. Does it get better ever?


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,351 ✭✭✭ doolox


    On the East Coast they get about 200 rainy days a year. The west Coast gets 300 rainy days a year. A good weather pattern depends on when you get your average of 40 depressions ( rain ) and 7 highs ( dry ) in any year. You should hope to get your high pressure events in June or July or August as this will bring warm sunny weather ( Warm = about 20 deg C ). Getting these highs in winter = frost, temps below 0 degrees. In order to have a mild frost free winter you should hope to have most of the depressions happening in the winter from Nov to March.

    If the opposite happens and you get a series of depressions in the Summer then you can have very wet cold and useless summer where everyone has to stay indoors, stuff is hard to dry and gets mouldy you have to dry your laundry indoors all the time and get mould everywhere and everyone is in a foul mood.....

    Because of its unpredictable weather Ireland has a very high rate of suicide, alcoholism, depression and people not inclined to plan too far ahead. Outdoor activities are not as plentiful as in other better countries and tend to be very active, hurling our national team sport is among the fastest games in the world. People play fast to stay warm. Our national dance is also very fast.

    Whisky in Ireland and Scotland is known as the water of life as it was considered a lifesaver in the days before decent housing and central heating. The russians with their even more appalling climate have a similar calamatous relationship with alcohol due to the need to keep warm by any means possible.

    Irelands climate is similar to the US northwest coast, Washington State and Oregan, dominated by rain. Also parts of the European low countries England and Scotland have rainy, depressing weather.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭ armabelle


    doolox wrote: »
    On the East Coast they get about 200 rainy days a year. The west Coast gets 300 rainy days a year. A good weather pattern depends on when you get your average of 40 depressions ( rain ) and 7 highs ( dry ) in any year. You should hope to get your high pressure events in June or July or August as this will bring warm sunny weather ( Warm = about 20 deg C ). Getting these highs in winter = frost, temps below 0 degrees. In order to have a mild frost free winter you should hope to have most of the depressions happening in the winter from Nov to March.

    If the opposite happens and you get a series of depressions in the Summer then you can have very wet cold and useless summer where everyone has to stay indoors, stuff is hard to dry and gets mouldy you have to dry your laundry indoors all the time and get mould everywhere and everyone is in a foul mood.....

    Because of its unpredictable weather Ireland has a very high rate of suicide, alcoholism, depression and people not inclined to plan too far ahead. Outdoor activities are not as plentiful as in other better countries and tend to be very active, hurling our national team sport is among the fastest games in the world. People play fast to stay warm. Our national dance is also very fast.

    Whisky in Ireland and Scotland is known as the water of life as it was considered a lifesaver in the days before decent housing and central heating. The russians with their even more appalling climate have a similar calamatous relationship with alcohol due to the need to keep warm by any means possible.

    Irelands climate is similar to the US northwest coast, Washington State and Oregan, dominated by rain. Also parts of the European low countries England and Scotland have rainy, depressing weather.

    booking ticket... must find sunshine


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,511 saywhatyousee


    doolox wrote: »
    On the East Coast they get about 200 rainy days a year. The west Coast gets 300 rainy days a year. A good weather pattern depends on when you get your average of 40 depressions ( rain ) and 7 highs ( dry ) in any year. You should hope to get your high pressure events in June or July or August as this will bring warm sunny weather ( Warm = about 20 deg C ). Getting these highs in winter = frost, temps below 0 degrees. In order to have a mild frost free winter you should hope to have most of the depressions happening in the winter from Nov to March.

    If the opposite happens and you get a series of depressions in the Summer then you can have very wet cold and useless summer where everyone has to stay indoors, stuff is hard to dry and gets mouldy you have to dry your laundry indoors all the time and get mould everywhere and everyone is in a foul mood.....

    Because of its unpredictable weather Ireland has a very high rate of suicide, alcoholism, depression and people not inclined to plan too far ahead. Outdoor activities are not as plentiful as in other better countries and tend to be very active, hurling our national team sport is among the fastest games in the world. People play fast to stay warm. Our national dance is also very fast.

    Whisky in Ireland and Scotland is known as the water of life as it was considered a lifesaver in the days before decent housing and central heating. The russians with their even more appalling climate have a similar calamatous relationship with alcohol due to the need to keep warm by any means possible.

    Irelands climate is similar to the US northwest coast, Washington State and Oregan, dominated by rain. Also parts of the European low countries England and Scotland have rainy, depressing weather.

    Irelands suicide rate is ranked 22 of 28 countries in the EU and between 58 and 62 in the world depending on which survey you use hardly one of the highest in the world


  • Registered Users Posts: 267 ✭✭ peneau


    armabelle wrote: »
    I know the weather in Ireland is bad but I didn't know it was going to be so bad and being new here (arrived in Jan) I have not seen one whole sunny day except for once about 6 weeks ago when it was cold as hell and it was only one day. Does it get better ever?

    Well there was about 3 months of them in the summer of '76 :D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,175 ✭✭✭ intheclouds


    peneau wrote: »
    Well there was about 3 months of them in the summer of '76 :D

    Summer of '95.

    I missed it actually because I was away off working on a J1 visa (I had plenty of sun!) - but every phone call home was dominated with talk of the great weather.

    This has been a particularly long cold spring imo though. Im not usually still in my full on winter coat in April.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,351 ✭✭✭ doolox


    I did the Leaving Cert in the Summer of '76 and it was a scorcher. Long June days in the 30's and stuck inside all day writing rubbish about Shakespeare, irregular verbs and other rubbish to keep the civil service happy.......

    I also recall 1984 as being a good one but 1986 was very wet. Also 1995 was good but 1996 or 97 was also very wet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭ armabelle



    This has been a particularly long cold spring imo though. Im not usually still in my full on winter coat in April.

    thats what they always say:(


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭ gozunda


    armabelle wrote: »
    ... Does it get better ever?



    No


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,328 Magico Gonzalez


    See that big lump of sea to the west, that's the Atlantic. You're sitting on the first little country on the North Atlantic shore

    Cue clouds and rain, but not much really cold weather.

    This can't be news to anyone.


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,209 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    armabelle wrote: »
    Is there ever a whole sunny day in Ireland?
    Not at night. :)

    Clear winter days tend to be colder than other winter days. Clear summer days tend to be warmer than other winter days. Part of this will be down to where winds are coming from, while the rest is down to solar gain / heat loss.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,664 ✭✭✭✭ JCX BXC


    You'll get a few in June July and August, don't worry!


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,770 ✭✭✭✭ Timberrrrrrrr


    armabelle wrote: »
    I know the weather in Ireland is bad but I didn't know it was going to be so bad and being new here (arrived in Jan) I have not seen one whole sunny day except for once about 6 weeks ago when it was cold as hell and it was only one day. Does it get better ever?

    Yes but it was way back nineteen-dickety-two.We had to say dickety because the Kaiser had stolen our word twenty. I chased that rascal to get it back, but gave up after dickety-six miles. What are you cackling at, fatty? Too much pie, that's your problem! Now, I'd like to digress from my prepared remarks to discuss how I invented the terlet...


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,541 anothernight


    armabelle wrote: »
    I know the weather in Ireland is bad but I didn't know it was going to be so bad and being new here (arrived in Jan) I have not seen one whole sunny day except for once about 6 weeks ago when it was cold as hell and it was only one day. Does it get better ever?

    I moved to Ireland years ago from a sunny country. It was June. The day we landed in Dublin, it was very cold (to me, anyway) and overcast. That summer my town saw rain every day except for three days. I don't remember there being much sunshine either and everything looked grey and depressing.

    But you know what? The Irish climate is actually pretty good, once you get used to it. It's a bit of a shock if you come from a sunny and (too) hot mediterranean country, but after a few months it's fine. It's only April and you've probably had a few partially sunny days. Give it another month or so and it'll be a lot better. The good thing is that it never gets too hot, so you can enjoy the sunshine and warmer temperature without feeling like you never want to see the sun again. And after all the rain, everything looks extra pretty on sunny days!

    (Yeah, my first summer in Ireland was definitely an exception.)
    Irelands suicide rate is ranked 22 of 28 countries in the EU and between 58 and 62 in the world depending on which survey you use hardly one of the highest in the world

    I think they're confusing it with the suicide rate for young people, which is indeed one of the highest in the EU. I think it's now the 5th highest for both genders though, as it's slowly dropping as far as I know.


  • Registered Users Posts: 761 youreadthat


    Well you've not even experienced the two warmest seasons yet (Summer-Autumn). I can't promise a great summer though as...well... the jet stream is often unkind on Ireland. Last year it was anchored over it and the only place in Britain or Ireland that ended up with a solid summer was South East and Eastern England, which was lucky for me!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,757 demanufactured


    There was one this one time in 2009.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 16,644 ✭✭✭✭ dr.fuzzenstein


    1005902_445912412274226_1368705693250564940_n.jpg?oh=6cd905a4496d3399e912419767f7e48f&oe=5776F715


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭ Oneiric 3


    doolox wrote: »
    Because of its unpredictable weather Ireland has a very high rate of suicide, alcoholism, depression and people not inclined to plan too far ahead.

    The weather NOTHING to do with the high suicide rate in this country. Perhaps mentioning that we living under a corrupt, self-serving establishment might be closer to the mark. Perhaps it would be more apt to mention a culture where alcohol excess is endorsed and celebrated, despite the fact that it destroys more lives, directly and indirectly, than smoking actually does. Or maybe the high suicide rate in the country is due to societal pressures, to live up to standards that cannot ever be achieved in reality. Or maybe it is down to the unspoken rules to conform to a cultural norm that refuses to stretch its bounds outside the limits of soul destroying mediocrity.

    The suggest that the high suicide rate is down the Irish climate is both naive and misleading.

    New Moon



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,664 ✭✭✭✭ JCX BXC


    Suicides can be attributed to the Irish Culture, overwhelmingly destroying personal debts and the lack of social activities in many rural areas. The weather does nothing more than put people in a bad mood.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,478 ✭✭✭ eeguy


    Youll get two good weeks when the Leaving Cert is on. Everything else is miserable


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,516 ✭✭✭ Ave Sodalis


    Carnacalla wrote:
    Suicides can be attributed to the Irish Culture, overwhelmingly destroying personal debts and the lack of social activities in many rural areas. The weather does nothing more than put people in a bad mood.


    It should also be pointed out that suicides are more likely to happen during spring/summer, than winter.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,628 ✭✭✭ Elmer Blooker


    December 24th and 25th 2010. :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,185 ✭✭✭✭ M.T. Cranium


    Based on my seven years of watching Irish weather closely, I would estimate that there are one or two cloudless days at some location each month, on average. I can remember some spells of four or five days of such days -- March 2012 comes to mind. Some months certainly come and go without one. This is a fairly low frequency for a mid-latitude climate though, the average is probably four to six in many parts of North America for example. When I say cloudless this excludes contrails or brief interruptions early in the morning after sunrise from mist.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,408 ✭✭✭ Jpmarn


    We seldom get wall to wall sunshine. It is also seldom get wall to wall continuous rainfall. About less than 33% of daylight hours in Ireland is sunshine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,554 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    doolox wrote: »
    I did the Leaving Cert in the Summer of '76 and it was a scorcher. Long June days in the 30's and stuck inside all day writing rubbish about Shakespeare, irregular verbs and other rubbish to keep the civil service happy.......

    I also recall 1984 as being a good one but 1986 was very wet. Also 1995 was good but 1996 or 97 was also very wet.

    To clarify your answer for "1996" or "1997" summers, well then here ya go:

    Summer 1996
    June: Very dry, sunny and warm.
    July: Mostly sunny, dry and warm.
    August: Relatively warm but wet and dull.

    Summer 1997
    June: Very wet, dull and cool. Malin Head was the sunny exception.
    July: Mild overall after an unseasonably cool start (the 1st was the coldest July day on record, even to this day). Relatively dry and sunny generally.
    August: Extremely wet in the south but very warm and dull generally.

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,554 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    December 24th and 25th 2010. :D

    Correct Christmas Day 2010 was one!

    Here's other days for you

    March 26 - 28 2012
    April 28 2012
    May 26 2012
    February 25 2013
    April 3 2013
    April 29 2013
    June 4 - 9 2013
    July 8 - 11 2013
    July 19 2013

    I will come up with more examples

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭ armabelle


    Based on my seven years of watching Irish weather closely, I would estimate that there are one or two cloudless days at some location each month, on average. I can remember some spells of four or five days of such days -- March 2012 comes to mind. Some months certainly come and go without one. This is a fairly low frequency for a mid-latitude climate though, the average is probably four to six in many parts of North America for example. When I say cloudless this excludes contrails or brief interruptions early in the morning after sunrise from mist.

    Here in Dublin there was only one full day of sunshine in February. I arrived at the beginning of the year and wait patienty for sun to take my little to see some sunlight. It is now April. One or two days a month is very optimistic and might be the case in wexford maybe?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭ armabelle


    sryanbruen wrote: »
    Correct Christmas Day 2010 was one!

    Here's other days for you

    March 26 - 28 2012
    April 28 2012
    May 26 2012
    February 25 2013
    April 3 2013
    April 29 2013
    June 4 - 9 2013
    July 8 - 11 2013
    July 19 2013

    I will come up with more examples

    the sad part is that I don't know if you are joking or not


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,664 ✭✭✭✭ JCX BXC


    armabelle wrote: »
    the sad part is that I don't know if you are joking or not
    He's not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 410 ✭✭ Jim Comic


    armabelle wrote: »
    Is there ever a whole sunny day in Ireland?


    no, never..... don't be preposterous


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,347 ✭✭✭✭ MJohnston


    I'm forever bemused by people who move to Ireland without a clue about the climate. What were you expecting?


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