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Software Systems Development

245

Comments

  • #2


    Can anyone tell me what programming languages are taught in first year?


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    Can anyone tell me what programming languages are taught in first year?

    Java for OO Programming.

    Basic PHP, HTML, CSS and maybe basic JQuery for Web.


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    Can anyone tell me what programming languages are taught in first year?

    The course is changing fairly soon because the course updates are happening either next year or the year after, so the course might be updated which is always a good thing.


  • #2


    The course is changing fairly soon because the course updates are happening either next year or the year after, so the course might be updated which is always a good thing.

    Course actually changes a lot each year anyway in 3rd and 4th year.

    1st and 2nd id say will always stay the same. What else can they do?

    The level of dropouts is shocking in all the Software courses so they cant/shouldnt make them harder.

    Java gives a great base in learning syntax and you cant really do any web development without learning HTML first.

    They should force students to use Github all the way through from the start and have a better emphasis on testing. Also they should strongly encourage students to use Eclipse from the start.


  • #2


    they should strongly encourage students to use Eclipse from the start.

    Two years of BlueJ, FML!


  • #2


    I know a good lot on html/css and a nice bit on Javascript, I know a bit on Java so should be fairly ok going to learn a lot more Java during the summer. I know most people will have different opinions but what would people say is the hardest part in first year in this course like what module or anything like that?


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    I know a good lot on html/css and a nice bit on Javascript, I know a bit on Java so should be fairly ok going to learn a lot more Java during the summer. I know most people will have different opinions but what would people say is the hardest part in first year in this course like what module or anything like that?

    I would say Java separates the people who want to learn from the people who dont. Anyone who fell behind dropped out.

    Use Eclipse. Spend about a week learning every shortcut you can.

    If you could build a basic Java Desktop App by the time you get to first year you will have an incredible advantage.

    Headfirst java is a great book. Available on the Bay.

    Lynda.com java videos also available on the Bay.

    CodeAcademy java - Drill through that once a forth night for the summer.

    You will probably be at 3rd year level if you get through all them.


  • #2


    Massive more industry focused changes coming to all of the WIT IT courses over the next three years.Complete overall of the curriculum of all courses with some disappearing and some merging.Great changes are coming


  • #2


    imacman wrote: »
    Massive more industry focused changes coming to all of the WIT IT courses over the next three years.Complete overall of the curriculum of all courses with some disappearing and some merging.Great changes are coming

    This is a tough one.

    If about 90% of people already drop out by the end of 4th year how do make a difference?

    Make it harder? Increased dropouts.
    Make it easier? Make graduates less attractive to industry

    I heard all lvl 7s are being dropped as they need to be to qualify as Uni.

    SSD is being rebranded as Enterprise Software development. Probably unchanged as its good enough for industry as it is.
    BSc IT is becoming something else that goes heavy into databases and networking as it should be.
    Applied will remain the same. Including the arrogance unfortunately. joke.
    Multimedia. Didnt hear anything.
    Forensics doesnt need to change either.

    Also funnily enough is the fact that SSD, Applied, Forensics and Ent Systems are already industry focused as the employers pretty much queue up in 4th year to give them jobs.

    Its Multimedia and BSc IT that need a serious going over.

    Multimedia is like the quiet person in the corner that no one knows who they are and 4th year BSc IT is literally a joke.

    I swear to god if they made that course harder there would be close to 0 people graduating. They should tell them to go to SSD or enter the workforce. Dropping 4th year IT and only having SSD as a choice to continue would be the obvious change to make or just merge them both, double the size and call it Enterprise Software Systems lvl 8 4 years. Have Programming as an option in 4th year OR a proper database module that brings you to an employable level in databases. That way you leave as either a programmer or a database admin and get a job.


  • #2


    This is a tough one.

    If about 90% of people already drop out by the end of 4th year how do make a difference?

    Make it harder? Increased dropouts.
    Make it easier? Make graduates less attractive to industry

    I heard all lvl 7s are being dropped as they need to be to qualify as Uni.

    SSD is being rebranded as Enterprise Software development. Probably unchanged as its good enough for industry as it is.
    BSc IT is becoming something else that goes heavy into databases and networking as it should be.
    Applied will remain the same. Including the arrogance unfortunately. joke.
    Multimedia. Didnt hear anything.
    Forensics doesnt need to change either.

    Also funnily enough is the fact that SSD, Applied, Forensics and Ent Systems are already industry focused as the employers pretty much queue up in 4th year to give them jobs.

    Its Multimedia and BSc IT that need a serious going over.

    Multimedia is like the quiet person in the corner that no one knows who they are and 4th year BSc IT is literally a joke.

    I swear to god if they made that course harder there would be close to 0 people graduating. They should tell them to go to SSD or enter the workforce. Dropping 4th year IT and only having SSD as a choice to continue would be the obvious change to make or just merge them both, double the size and call it Enterprise Software Systems lvl 8 4 years. Have Programming as an option in 4th year OR a proper database module that brings you to an employable level in databases. That way you leave as either a programmer or a database admin and get a job.
    I think making it harder and raising the points is the only way to go , numbers will be lower in first year but the retention of those numbers will be higher and more people will graduate.
    Nobody who gets 300 points or under should be let into and IT course . Applied computing is a good example of the way to go , the points are higher , the course is really hard and they get 20-30 people each year. The retention on this course is good and graduates have nearly 100% employment rate and many of them have work lined up before they graduate. Thats a successful model


  • #2


    imacman wrote: »
    I think making it harder and raising the points is the only way to go , numbers will be lower in first year but the retention of those numbers will be higher and more people will graduate.
    Nobody who gets 300 points or under should be let into and IT course . Applied computing is a good example of the way to go , the points are higher , the course is really hard and they get 20-30 people each year. The retention on this course is good and graduates have nearly 100% employment rate and many of them have work lined up before they graduate. Thats a successful model

    16 people graduated Applied last year, Ent Sytems 15, Forensics 8, 8 IT and 9 SSD then the Chinese that join them bringing that to over 50.

    Applied, Ent Systems, Forensices and SSD all had 100% employment (in IT related roles). That is the poeple who wanted work that is. Clearly some people emigrated etc.

    Also to say that anyone who got less than 300 points shouldnt be allowed into an IT course is just silly. Basing someones passion for Software on their geography or french LC results isnt very smart. How many people dropped out of the Software courses that got way more than that? Also if a course is 250 points it obviously doesnt mean that everyone got 250.

    There is no successful model really.


  • #2


    16 people graduated Applied last year, Ent Sytems 15, Forensics 8, 8 IT and 9 SSD then the Chinese that join them bringing that to over 50.

    Applied, Ent Systems, Forensices and SSD all had 100% employment (in IT related roles). That is the poeple who wanted work that is. Clearly some people emigrated etc.

    Also to say that anyone who got less than 300 points shouldnt be allowed into an IT course is just silly. Basing someones passion for Software on their geography or french LC results isnt very smart. How many people dropped out of the Software courses that got way more than that? Also if a course is 250 points it obviously doesnt mean that everyone got 250.

    There is no successful model really.
    Yeah I think you are right, putting a minimum leaving cert points requirement on IT is ridiculous. If someone manages to be good at Irish or Woodwork != having ability for IT. A lot of people come into IT courses and they might have a lot of leaving cert points but they only choose IT because their parents forced them to because 'there is money in dem computers'. From my own IT course I have seen people struggling along who have no interest in tech at all. An ideal situation would be to interview people and see if they actually have an interest in the course, but that is never going to happen because of the cao system.


  • #2


    The course you choose isn't the deciding factor in gaining employment when you finish, many more factors come into play. There are literally grad jobs everywhere these days.

    I graduated a while back and had no problem finding employment. As with every department in every college that has ever existed people always talk up their course and down others - it's natural. Just because you completed a software based course doesn't mean you can code. If you want to learn how to code then put in the effort in college and some outside self learning - this should see you on your way.


  • #2


    Mr_Muffin wrote: »
    The course you choose isn't the deciding factor in gaining employment when you finish, many more factors come into play. There are literally grad jobs everywhere these days.

    I graduated a while back and had no problem finding employment. As with every department in every college that has ever existed people always talk up their course and down others - it's natural. Just because you completed a software based course doesn't mean you can code. If you want to learn how to code then put in the effort in college and some outside self learning - this should see you on your way.

    Didnt you hear that the Java in Applied computing is WAAAAYYY different to the Java they teach in all the other courses! :pac:

    Sure why else would they look down at the other courses? In my company they have a special area sectioned off for the elite of WIT. I am of course referring to the Applied computing students. Cant have them associating with the riff raff. They wouldnt be used to that after 4 years of being on such a high level.

    Nah in reality you hit the nail on the head.


  • #2


    As far as the points requirement goes the person most likely to get the highest marks in Applied this year as in 85% plus got just a little over 300 points on the l. cert. College is a chance to put in the work you didn't previously. I think maybe an interview process for those below a certain mark is probably a good idea?

    Don't know where the idea of Applied being arrogant is coming from, Ill be honest we, (like I imagine the rest of students who graduate this year in all the i.t courses) really couldn't care less about anyone or anything other than finishing the course right now, these courses are a slog and there is zero arrogance and zero time for it. Everyone I know from Applied had a good look at all the project posters that are up to see what everyone had built, nobodys poster was skipped over or laughed at except that ridiculous fitness app with the less than adequately clothed woman.

    Nobody is queuing up for Applied Graduates either, your cv/linkedin stands on its own accord. 99% of employers will care more about your project than your course and more care about whether you made a contribution to an open source project... if they don't then they probably don't want you for interesting jobs.

    As far as I hear it Forensics is being merged in to Applied and more Dev Ops stuff is coming in to Applied before the stream choice... I think anyone would be mad not to do IOT Applied given the choice over anyway, and select the cloud choice if they've a general interest in programming. And for anyone wondering about the IOT course and what the current fourth eyars think, most of us would've loved to have done it and that is a course that stands out to employers imo... its ahead of the curve right now and expect other colleges t start copying it soon.

    Like the idea of a more database centric and networking course if thats what IT is being developed in to as well, sounds interesting.


  • #2


    Course actually changes a lot each year anyway in 3rd and 4th year.

    1st and 2nd id say will always stay the same. What else can they do?

    The level of dropouts is shocking in all the Software courses so they cant/shouldnt make them harder.

    Java gives a great base in learning syntax and you cant really do any web development without learning HTML first.

    They should force students to use Github all the way through from the start and have a better emphasis on testing. Also they should strongly encourage students to use Eclipse from the start.

    Yeah I think ti goes on a four year review cycle. They're trying to alter the courses so they can adapt it much more quickly without seeking approval from the externals. Adding to digitals here, don't ignore the basics like css or html they come in handy at times. Java is a good base for learning programming but you can then branch out to a language you enjoy coding in and learn a lot of its nuances... Java is developing still but Javascript is the big deal right now and it will be something else after that. Don't know about testing :D but the version control with github or something like sounds good. The developer student pack is giving out free private repositories for it as well atm, you just need a college email... also some free credits for AWS or Digital Ocean which can host websites so you cna sink your teeth in to messing around with your own deployment etc.

    Learn the basics, know it inside out and the same with each new language. There's no point knowing 6 languages if you can't really program in any. Learn everything you're given and more


  • #2


    Clicked on and saw this course mentioned and I had to have a peep.
    I was wondering how many lab hours are there approximately in this course?
    Is it the same as IT or are there more, because the easiest way to learn programming is generally physically doing it as opposed reading notes I find.


  • #2


    DipDab93 wrote: »
    Clicked on and saw this course mentioned and I had to have a peep.
    I was wondering how many lab hours are there approximately in this course?
    Is it the same as IT or are there more, because the easiest way to learn programming is generally physically doing it as opposed reading notes I find.

    You can have all the lab hours you want outside of college.


  • #2


    Completed my PLC with 7 distinctions and 1 merit so it gives me the opportunity to study somewhere else. Would anyone recommend me trying to go somewhere else to study Software Development or Computer Science or even trying to do the Applied Computing at WIT instead? Or should I stay with Software Systems Development here? As I have the course deferred already?


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    Completed my PLC with 7 distinctions and 1 merit so it gives me the opportunity to study somewhere else. Would anyone recommend me trying to go somewhere else to study Software Development or Computer Science or even trying to do the Applied Computing at WIT instead? Or should I stay with Software Systems Development here? As I have the course deferred already?

    If you want to do programming I think SSD would be a good course for you to pick. There is lots of great lecturers and the programming modules start from the basics and build on them. I did IT for the first three years which shared most of the same modules as SSD except for the stream options which you have in SSD. The languages taught are Java, Javascript, SQL, NoSQL, html, css and more but I cant remember right now.

    I'm also switching to SSD in fourth year because there is programming in the fourth year of SSD but there is no programming in year 4 of IT. I have heard recently that this is the last year that they are allowing people to switch courses from SSD to IT or vice versa when going into fourth year, so in the future people will have to stick with the course they choose when starting in year 1.

    edit: Just to let you know I also went into WIT after doing a PLC in WCFE and got into WIT via that route (7 distinctions and 1 merit also) If you want any help or want to ask any questions you are welcome to pm me and I'll help you with anything I can.


  • #2



    I have heard recently that this is the last year that they are allowing people to switch courses from SSD to IT or vice versa when going into fourth year, so in the future people will have to stick with the course they choose when starting in year 1.

    I believe they are making both of them a 4 year level 8 degree so they can apply for university status.

    Should be good for the area if they get University status.


  • #2


    I believe they are making both of them a 4 year level 8 degree so they can apply for university status.

    Should be good for the area if they get University status.

    Yeah from what I heard they are taking programming out of the IT degree after first year and doing streams where people can either focus on Big Data/Databases or Networking. Whereas both SSD/IT are similar enough up until fourth year now, starting soon they will be two totally different courses, with SSD focusing heavily on programming.

    University status would be good for the area alright but don't a certain amount of lecturers have to have PHDs to become a university?


  • #2


    Can anyone tell me what the classes are like, are you in computer labs much? And not that it matters or anything but which do students go with more osx linux or windows?


  • #2


    And one other thing what is the timetable like are you usually in from 9-4?


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    Can anyone tell me what the classes are like, are you in computer labs much? And not that it matters or anything but which do students go with more osx linux or windows?

    In the labs a decent amount of time. The machines there were pretty slow when I was there a few years ago, might be upgraded now. All Windows machines apart from a couple of rooms with Macs for the design students.

    The majority of students seemed to be running Windows laptops when I was there, only using the lab machines when they had to.


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    Can anyone tell me what the classes are like, are you in computer labs much? And not that it matters or anything but which do students go with more osx linux or windows?

    Get used to putting in 1000s of hours at home. Lab PCs have drastically improved in recent years and have i7s and Xeons now but your work will be on your laptop so it makes no sense to use them that often.

    Windows and Linux all the way. A very powerful ultrabook is the ideal student laptop. portable and powerful. Mac has the benefit of being resellable for a good price but you pay more for it to begin.

    Class hours are about 20 hours a week. Had a couple of late mornings and a couple of half days every year. Lecturers are human too. They will try work in a few half days if they can.

    1st and 2nd year are maybe 7 out of 10 difficult. 6th semester was absolute hell with projects being due and pain in the arse tests then 4th year was really busy but not hard. 4th year you could put in 14 hours per day handy enough.


  • #2


    Last thing I want to know is why does the course have such a high dropout rate is it through any fault of the course or is it just students not putting in the work and thinking because of the low points it'll be easy?


  • #2


    J98 wrote: »
    Last thing I want to know is why does the course have such a high dropout rate is it through any fault of the course or is it just students not putting in the work and thinking because of the low points it'll be easy?

    All IT courses have a HUGE dropout rate. In fact all 4 year college courses have a fairly big dropout rate.

    They are all about the same. 50 odd start 1st year and about 10 graduate.

    1 - Laziness.
    2 - Immaturity.
    3 - People get jobs and drop out.
    4 - Fail tests
    5 - Money
    6 - People realize that its not for them.

    Points has very little to do with it i would say. Then again someone who gets very low points in the leaving usually is a combination of the 5.

    Dont let all this turn you off anyway. This isnt exclusive to SSD. Not by a long shot.

    It has a 100% employment rate and well paid jobs at the end of it. In Waterford expect to start off on about 25k-30k and go to about 40k after 3 or 4 years in work then 50-60 after maybe 6-8 years. In Dublin/Cork you can add 5 or 10 to that.

    Examples in Waterford

    Job with 3 years experience 40-50k

    http://www.irishjobs.ie/Jobs/Senior-Software-Tester-Waterford-7855912.aspx

    6 years Experience 50-60k

    http://www.irishjobs.ie/Jobs/Senior-Oracle-Developer-Waterford-7863728.aspx

    3 years 55k

    http://www.irishjobs.ie/Jobs/NET-Software-Developer-7859687.aspx

    Most jobs have no amount public but they are average wages for someone good.

    IrishJobs Site

    http://www.irishjobs.ie/ShowResults.aspx?Keywords=&Location=48&Category=3&Recruiter=Company&Recruiter=Agency


  • #2


    Have been reading on boards and have seen people saying how much better the Applied Computing course is at WIT then the Software Systems Development. how true is this? Which course is better for someone looking to be a Software Developer/programmer?


  • #2


    _JimPix_ wrote: »
    Have been reading on boards and have seen people saying how much better the Applied Computing course is at WIT then the Software Systems Development. how true is this? Which course is better for someone looking to be a Software Developer/programmer?

    Graduated from SSD with a 1.1. Ive beaten many Applied Students to jobs. 5 jobs in total now at this stage. I only accepted one of course but i was offered 5. Also interviewed where people from other WIT courses but its Applied you ask about.

    I also work alongside people who graduated from most Software courses in WIT including Applied.

    One thing ive always noticed is that Applied are the only ones who actually seem to care about the title of the course. Im really not sure why. This strange arrogance that they seem to have. The programming languages we all work with in college and work are the same. A lot of the modules are just renamed with the same content. They lead to the same Masters and jobs.

    One thing is for absolute certain. Employers do not give a **** about the title of your course. Not by a long shot. In fact you will look like a complete prat if you say to a professional that your Software course is better then any other Software course.

    Also your last question there. the only course that drops Software in 4th year is I.T so basically anything else will lead to a career in Software if you want that.


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