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Detailing chat

  • 11-04-2014 9:13pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    Hi I've been thinking it'd be nice to have a thread where simple questions that people don't want to create a thread for, could go. Or any chat related to detailing.

    I've a question. If I've put a wax on, then a sealant. Then after a few weeks or w/e I'm thinking the shine isn't what it was. (After washing obviously) Can I apply wax on top of whatever sealant and wax is left from the first time, or do I have to remove the remaining sealant + wax first?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,792 ✭✭✭Ded_Zebra


    You best ask the mods before starting a chat thread, they need rules and stuff… PM one of them and see what they say.:)


  • Posts: 14,344 ✭✭✭✭ Rex Magnificent Shortbread


    'Today I did' seems to be a jack of all trades thread. General Q+A mixed in with a few "look what I did" posts.

    I've learned more from that thread than anywhere else, about detailing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    Yeah but for the question I had for example, I didn't really want to post it there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,377 ✭✭✭Curran


    OP in response to your question....

    Is the reason you are asking the question because you have applied a sealant, then wax, then washed it, and its not as shiny as you had hoped?

    The reason could be two fold here.
    Sealants are applied first, then waxes (if you are choosing to apply both, its not necessary to do so)
    The products used arent a good combo - by that, I mean they arent designed to be used together, so they may not work together. As a rule of thumb, its best to stick with products from the same manufacturer when layering on the paintwork. So its best to use a sealant and wax from the same manufacturer. They are designed to bond well together. If you mix product manufacturers they arent designed to specifically work together and as a result the sealant might hinder the bonding of the wax applied afterwards.
    Its for this reason that sometimes people hear great things about certain products and when they use it themselves they think its rubbish, but that could be partly down to the preparation or process they've used.

    There is no problem in topping up protection at a later date; however it shouldnt really be necessary. What is easier is if you feel that the shine isnt what it used to be, is to have a spray sealant / quick detailer type product. Wash the car, dry it, spray this product on and buff it off. Boosts shine and protection. But again, choosing which one to buy is sometimes restricted by the product you applied on the car initially. There are certain ones available which will bond to almost any product.

    Another thing to consider is the preparation of the paintwork - did you clay the car when you applied the products first?
    Going forward its probably best to get some life out of the wax / sealant you have applied. After a few weeks, wash it down with an APC, clay it and re-apply; sealant first, then the wax (assuming they'll work together)

    If you let me know what you have, I'll tell you if they'll work. And if you tell me the colour of your car, I'll tell you which would be best on its own if they dont work well together.

    Hope this helps! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    For some reason I was thinking you apply wax first, then sealant on top of it as the sealant was the more durable.

    By wax I was refering to autoglym super resin polish, which isn't really a wax. And by sealant autoglym extra gloss protection.

    I was and am fairly happy with the shine of the car. I applied one layer of srp and 3 of egp. But am thinking I could have applied a few layers of the srp.

    I'm now wondering could I apply a layer or 2 of the srp on top of what's on there(followed by another layer of egp). Or would I have to remove everything again. Or I suppose I could try an actual wax on top of what's on there now.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,377 ✭✭✭Curran


    Yeah; SRP isnt a wax its a polish. It contains fillers to help hide swirls. SRP and EGP are designed to work well together.

    EGP would be more durable applied directly to the paintwork.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    Could you apply collinite 845 for example on top of what's on there now?!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,377 ✭✭✭Curran


    You could, but I wouldn't be able to say that it would work well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,467 ✭✭✭✭vectra


    nd wrote: »
    Could you apply collinite 845 for example on top of what's on there now?!

    Clay your car
    Apply 2 coats of Collinite 845.
    Stand back and smile :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    After putting it off for ages I've finally ordered some :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 15,467 ✭✭✭✭vectra


    nd wrote: »
    After putting it off for ages I've finally ordered some :)

    You wont regret it.
    I know it lasts ages but no harm in a quick top up every month or so.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,647 ✭✭✭✭punisher5112


    Hi where is a good place to get the collinite or something similar as I have no sealant.

    I have done the Wash, de tar, wash, clay and wash taking wheels off and fully cleaned inside out and then used turtle wax ice wax and found the results amazing but looking for that bit extra to make the car stand out and look the job.

    Any other tips as it's been 6 months since I done all that and have put a lot of mileage up and have been unable to wash as much as I use to.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,854 ✭✭✭✭MetzgerMeister


    I'll give a +1 to 2 coats of Collinite 845 after a claying. I'm going to be topping up my coat of it with OAC perfection for the foreseeable future. 2 excellent products that I missed until now :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    Hi where is a good place to get the collinite or something similar as I have no sealant.

    I have done the Wash, de tar, wash, clay and wash taking wheels off and fully cleaned inside out and then used turtle wax ice wax and found the results amazing but looking for that bit extra to make the car stand out and look the job.

    Any other tips as it's been 6 months since I done all that and have put a lot of mileage up and have been unable to wash as much as I use to.

    I've ordered it off here

    http://www.detailingshed.com/waxes/243-collinite-845-liquid-insulator-wax.html

    which Curran the poster in this thread runs/owns I believe.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    I'm planning to try it on top of my autoglym stuff I've already applied. No harm in trying or would you all recommend not?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,952 ✭✭✭Liamalone


    I have a slight dent in the bodywork, will this magical Collinite 845 sort it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    nope.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,467 ✭✭✭✭vectra


    Liamalone wrote: »
    I have a slight dent in the bodywork, will this magical Collinite 845 sort it?

    Nope
    It would certainly show it up more though so as it would be easier to find LOL


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,719 ✭✭✭JaMarcusHustle


    Hey guys, I hope this isn't against the charter - if it is, please delete - but I figured this would be of most interest to this forum. I have a €100 voucher for Spirit Detailing (recommended on this very forum) that I unfortunately won't get to use before it expires (25th June). I'm letting it go on Adverts if anyone is interested. I won't post the link, but you can either search for it or fire me a PM and I'll send a link in reply. Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,000 ✭✭✭mad m


    Any recommendations on keeping a new car coat nice and shiny. Will Collinite 845 be the dogs? Also what's good for keeping alloys sealed. Want to keep them handy to clean for future.

    Thanks.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 15,467 ✭✭✭✭vectra


    mad m wrote: »
    Any recommendations on keeping a new car coat nice and shiny. Will Collinite 845 be the dogs? Also what's good for keeping alloys sealed. Want to keep them handy to clean for future.

    Thanks.

    Use the 845 on the paint and on the wheels.:cool:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,855 ✭✭✭nd


    So when drying your car. Do you all basically just do the bonnet and roof, or the whole lot? if the lot. On the sides, what exactly do you do? On the bonnet and roof I've been just putting the towel down and pulling it across.

    And how dry do you get your car? Just that the majority of the water is gone or actually dry.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,377 ✭✭✭Curran


    Firstly you should be using a plush microfibre drying towel.
    Provided the car is cleaned very well if should be OK to wipe, but to limit swirling as much as possible its recommended to pat the surface.
    All paintwork to be dried as best as possible, but a minimum of no beads, streaks or runs of water. You'll get a damp finish that will dry out with leaving any water staining. Some people get the car reasonably dry and follow up with a quick detailer spray. Spray on, buff off to ensure the perfect finish.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,015 ✭✭✭✭Mc Love


    Curran wrote: »
    . Some people get the car reasonably dry and follow up with a quick detailer spray. Spray on, buff off to ensure the perfect finish.

    And then follow up with a LSP?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,377 ✭✭✭Curran


    Mc Love wrote: »
    And then follow up with a LSP?

    No, that was just the drying technique assuming you already have a LSP applied and its just a regular wash & dry.

    LSP is Last Stage Protection for anyone not in the know - Wax / Sealant


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,854 ✭✭✭✭MetzgerMeister


    Using a quick detailer before applying an LSP will reduce the efficiency and bonding properties of the LSP due to the quick detailer adding a layer in between the paint and the LSP.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,295 ✭✭✭Harcrid


    What would be the best way to tackle this scratch on my bootlid? Would a DA be needed or is there a product that can be applied by hand that would improve it?


    IMAG0253_zpsca136d16.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,377 ✭✭✭Curran


    Do you mean improve it permanently by hand? Wont really be possible. A hand polish will improve the appearance due to fillers but will eventually wash out and back to square one. The very fine marks might be improved slightly by hand, but overall not a huge difference will be made. DA Im afraid.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,295 ✭✭✭Harcrid


    Ok cool. Cheers.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,854 ✭✭✭✭MetzgerMeister


    Yep, that's certainly a D/A job.


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