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Toys

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Comments



  • Goldieblox is pre emptively suiing the Beastie Boys.

    Makes them assholes in my book.

    Plus actual engineers rated the toy poorly.




  • Dean0088 wrote: »
    Whats with all the "I HAVE TO GET MY DAUGHTER INTERESTED IN SCIENCE!!" attitude around here... It's like a dad pushing his son into football or GAA when he doesn't want to.

    Why not let your kid roam free.

    .

    I agree.
    That's why I don't like companys making selections for children by making a toy appear a certain way and calling that a boys' toy or a girls' toy. Let them play with what they want themselves.




  • fits wrote: »
    I agree.
    That's why I don't like companys making selections for children by making a toy appear a certain way and calling that a boys' toy or a girls' toy. Let them play with what they want themselves.

    Also Lego over complicated their toy with all these addendums for girls. If I had a daughter, I'd still by her normal Lego, because there is more imaginitive use in it rather than these Lego for girls versions which corral the imagination with pre-emptive choices made by the designers.

    The simpler the better, for boy or girl.




  • Boys stuff is also a lot more elaborate. But they usually follow the instructions for a while and then it just all gets mixed up. Earlier a naughty toy (a fierman) was robbing chocolate from the police station build from different blocks and bits of stable and fire station sets. He was chased by two policemen (a pilot and a boy figure).

    I actually dislike it how all the toys have to be educational. Children won't get phd in maths if their electronic rattle tells them numbers when they are six months old. Tbh at the moment I'm just grateful if the toy keeps them occupied for a while.




  • meeeeh wrote: »
    Boys stuff is also a lot more elaborate. But they usually follow the instructions for a while and then it just all gets mixed up. Earlier a naughty toy (a fierman) was robbing chocolate from the police station build from different blocks and bits of stable and fire station sets. He was chased by two policemen (a pilot and a boy figure).

    I actually dislike it how all the toys have to be educational. Children won't get phd in maths if their electronic rattle tells them numbers when they are six months old. Tbh at the moment I'm just grateful if the toy keeps them occupied for a while.

    A lot of toys discussed here are aimed at kids under 8. Kids that age havn't a clue what they're playing with really.

    A girl playing with a kitchen doesn't mean she'll grow up to be a house wife. Just like a boy playing with an Action Man doesn't mean he'll grow up to be soldier. Chances are, action man will end up in the oven as part of a quiche while Barbie swims around in her swimming pool (the sink).

    If a kids going to be an engineer, chances are when they're 14 or so you'll find them sitting in front of a PC teaching themselves programming or fixing things around the house.

    Educational toys make me cringe much the same way that parents forcing their kids to do piano lessons make me angry. The failures of the parents are visited upon the children. I also found the likes of Mechano to be incredibly boring as a kid. It looks complex but really it's just an overly elaborate set of instructions like an Ikea flatpack that doesn't allow for any creativity or problem solving. I much preferred following my dad around as he rewired a plug or fixed the sink.


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  • bluewolf wrote: »
    I don't know, I was nearly "forced" into my cello lessons for years but when I got into early teens, I very much appreciated them and it turned into a passion. It's dull and boring playing something when you sound like you're killing a cat, just have to tough it out
    I think music is wonderful and there could be worse than trying to stimulate their creative side that way. Needs to go hand in hand with an appreciation of listening to classical music as well though
    (I'm not sure where there is a "failure" of the parent there either?)

    I'd say you'd be the exception to the rule.

    I grew up with three people (classmates / friends) who were pushed by their parents into stuff they didn't want to do.

    One chap was put into drama classes from a young age. He got quite good and in his teens was on Fair City in extras roles, a few lines here and there. Yet he confided in myself and a few people over the years that he hated doing it. He genuinely despised acting but didn't want to let his parents down.

    Another girl had thousands spent on piano lessons over a few years. She reached 15 and just refused to go anymore.

    I think if a kid shows an interest then it should be nurtured. But there's loads of parents who push their kids into hobbies that make them look good in front of other parents / appear to be a model family.




  • Dean0088 wrote: »
    I'd say you'd be the exception to the rule.

    I grew up with three people (classmates / friends) who were pushed by their parents into stuff they didn't want to do.

    One chap was put into drama classes from a young age. He got quite good and in his teens was on Fair City in extras roles, a few lines here and there. Yet he confided in myself and a few people over the years that he hated doing it. He genuinely despised acting but didn't want to let his parents down.

    Another girl had thousands spent on piano lessons over a few years. She reached 15 and just refused to go anymore.

    I think if a kid shows an interest then it should be nurtured. But there's loads of parents who push their kids into hobbies that make them look good in front of other parents / appear to be a model family.

    Yeah tbf there's a big difference between encouraging kids who have interest/aptitude for a skill and forcing them to do it. I loved going to music classes as a child, but can still remember the frustration of the kids who obviously had no natural ability and hated it, but were forced to go week in/ week out.




  • Because engineering is fashionable or something. I agree it's a little weird.

    Holy majoley! I've never been fashionable before! :)




  • pwurple wrote: »
    Holy majoley! I've never been fashionable before! :)

    Well you are now.




  • bluewolf wrote: »
    I don't know, I was nearly "forced" into my cello lessons for years but when I got into early teens, I very much appreciated them and it turned into a passion. It's dull and boring playing something when you sound like you're killing a cat, just have to tough it out
    I think music is wonderful and there could be worse than trying to stimulate their creative side that way. Needs to go hand in hand with an appreciation of listening to classical music as well though
    (I'm not sure where there is a "failure" of the parent there either?)

    Yah I think that you might be an exception to the rule. I loved music from very very young, around five I started violin. My parents never had to force me to practise or to to lessons. I had an inner drive with it. I was drawn to it and we just clicked.

    But music is also so good for you, it should be required in schools.


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  • meeeeh wrote: »
    Nobody is complaining why there are mostly pink doll houses. And yet they support creativity and so on but because there is a cooker in them they shouldn't played with.

    There are loads of non-pink dolls houses around too, to be fair.

    Here's the one we have. It's awesome, and both boys and girls play with it when they visit! Check out the water butt, solar panel, wind turbine and segregated recycling. haw!

    v74g.jpg




  • I need this^^^. Screw the kids, its for me. Where did you get it?




  • lazygal wrote: »
    I need this^^^. Screw the kids, its for me. Where did you get it?

    It was a gift, and I *think* they got it in a polish shop in cork. BUT, a google for eco dollhouse has located them on amazon.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Voila-Wooden-Eco-Dolls-House-Furniture/dp/B003QXMV0K




  • This came up in my newsfeed today and made me think of this thread.

    1452380_696607237018432_1248650601_n.jpg




  • Anyone watch the toy show? Boys given lego and robots to test and review, girls given hair salons and dollies.

    There was one awesome moment though, where the two kids called Rhianna and Destiny reviewed their array of Pinkness, and declared the pink Nerf Guns to be the most fun on the table.




  • pwurple wrote: »
    There was one awesome moment though, where the two kids called Rhianna and Destiny reviewed their array of Pinkness, and declared the pink Nerf Guns to be the most fun on the table.

    That bit kind of disturbed me actually as Destiny said that before Nerf only made guns for boys but she was really glad they'd now started to make them for girls as they were such fun. It really made it clear that gender assignment of toys really does mean that some kids are missing out on toys they would enjoy because the are marketed to the other gender.




  • The gender thing is annoying, this is for boys, this is for girls, my daughter loves camping, soldiers and nerf guns (without the pink) and so consequently all her toys are got in the boys section, same as her clothes, back to the original comment on what to get an 8 year old boy, paper mache is very popular with our kids, not that awful clumpy stuff we did at school either, they use watered down PVA glue and polyfilla, the last few layors are done with coloured tissue paper and sanded smooth, it gets a plastic/glazed look to it.




  • Very interesting thread and discussion, maybe I'll bring it to live again ;)

    I'm from the younger part of the millennial generation (born 1988) and I don't remember toys in my day being as clearly divided by gender as they are now. They weren't pink and blue, they didn't have "for girls" or "for boys" labels. Thanks to the fact that there were no labels, boys were not ashamed to play with us girls, Barbie or at home, e.g. washing, ironing, cooking dinner. We got social skills maybe, but there was not such pressure to treat toys as an educational help.

    Toys are thankfully changing a lot lately and becoming more educational (although looking after the house and playing adult is also part of the education). Some time ago we were at a Lego workshop combined with a building exhibition and even for me, an adult, it was an amazing experience and fun. At the workshop you could rebuild your old sets (like a Lego car) into a bicycle or scooter according to Green Instructions, and at the same time listen to lectures on the environment adapted to children.

    I played with blocks when I was 5-8 years old, but nobody ever suggested to me that this could be an introduction to something more, to an interest in engineering or technology. Girls at a certain stage of development were even discouraged from developing in these directions, as if it was reserved for one sex. I remember at school a teacher waving his hand when asking girls and giving them a grade of D or E. He didn't see the potential in us. I envy the kids now that they have such opportunities, that everyone is literally standing on their heads to show them that climate change (and any other too) is up to them, to push them to be active, to explore the world themselves. Back in my school days, teachers mainly cared about surviving until 3-4 PM, assigning tasks and going home.




  • I started this thread so it’s funny to see it going again.


    I have two little boys now who play with tractors, dolls houses musical instruments, tea sets etc. One of them his favourite Pyjamas are a superman set and sky from paw patrol set ( both inherited). They have no concept of certain things and colours being ‘for girls’

    The main thing that annoys me now is how male characters outnumber female in almost every book and cartoon. Even recent classics like the Gruffalo - all male characters. .




  • Lol, it is funny to see it popping up again, and my assumption was something a little naughtier. ;)

    But, on the topic at hand, my children are now a bit older, so maybe there's more perspective. I've two girls, one is almost a teenager now.
    For lego, (mainly because I wanted to go!) we went to the Lego House in Denmark a few years ago. It was absolutely brilliant, and did soften me a little on the lego friends slightly. Mostly because they have improved the range considerably. There is a hospital, and a very cool treehouse set in particular that my youngest was very taken with. So, we have a friends treehouse set added into the pile too. She mostly builds houses with extravagant roof gardens, balconys and everything for some reason contains multiple toilets. :D

    When they were younger, it was more imaginative play, about the figures and what they did and said. As they got older it's more about the structure of the building itself, they got sucked into minecraft also. It's the nature of development I think.

    I can highly recommend Snap Circuits toy by the way as a non-gender toy. My ten year old loves this. making things fly off, funny noises, lie detectors.


    Board and card games came into a life of their own as well as they aged.

    This is an absolute blast:
    Unstable Unicorns
    Not for very small children, I'd say 10-12 is about the youngest for it. but, I have taken this out of the box to play with grownups when the kids have gone to bed. It's great fun.


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  • pwurple wrote: »
    Lol, it is funny to see it popping up again, and my assumption was something a little naughtier. ;)

    Me too and then I realised I started it. Thread title fail :D


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