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Redwater

2

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,855 ✭✭✭I said


    tanko wrote: »
    I didn't know that spot on prevented red water, I suppose it's a fair bit cheaper than Bayticol?

    Poron sp


  • Registered Users Posts: 445 ✭✭poor farmer


    I have a good fr cow that is rearing calves with redwater this evening.
    She was a bit dull/empty looking this morning and I wasn't sure what was up but spent a bit of time with her this eve and low and behold .
    I never saw it on this farm before.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,907 ✭✭✭✭cj maxx


    I said wrote: »
    Bayticol is the only job apply and move them it's effective straight away.always use it for first dose and then spot on every six weeks.

    How much Bayticol would do 8 yearlings , and can it be got in quantities less than 1 l if i dont need that much ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,855 ✭✭✭I said


    cjmc wrote: »
    How much Bayticol would do 8 yearlings , and can it be got in quantities less than 1 l if i dont need that much ?

    Only ever got 1lt don't think it can be got in smaller sizes


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,907 ✭✭✭✭cj maxx


    I said wrote: »
    Only ever got 1lt don't think it can be got in smaller sizes

    Is it an injecrion or pour- on ?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,855 ✭✭✭I said


    cjmc wrote: »
    Is it an injecrion or pour- on ?

    Pour on


  • Registered Users Posts: 993 ✭✭✭roosky


    Marooned75 wrote:
    Bayticol every 6 weeks best dose for it know its expense but it works the best of all.


    I thought baytocol only lasted 2 weeks


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,378 ✭✭✭epfff


    Get imozal injection from your vet
    More expensive but still better value


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,100 ✭✭✭tanko


    epfff wrote: »
    Get imozal injection from your vet
    More expensive but still better value

    Do you use it to prevent Red water, like a vaccination?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,855 ✭✭✭I said


    tanko wrote: »
    Do you use it to prevent Red water, like a vaccination?

    213meat withdrawal period for the injection


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,100 ✭✭✭tanko


    I said wrote: »
    213meat withdrawal period for the injection

    True, that's the big down side to it but it's a super cure if given early enough.


  • Registered Users Posts: 734 ✭✭✭longgonesilver


    As far as I know it is the only cure. You have a choice between the dead lorry or the injection, and if the animal is not two far gone it will work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 445 ✭✭poor farmer


    I have a good fr cow that is rearing calves with redwater this evening.
    She was a bit dull/empty looking this morning and I wasn't sure what was up but spent a bit of time with her this eve and low and behold .
    I never saw it on this farm before.

    Update; Got 10 ml imizol of the vet, gave it to her yesterday eve also dosed 1litre
    liquid parafin. Still quite dull this am gave 3 tins treacle .
    I think she's on the mend this evening.


  • Registered Users Posts: 222 ✭✭Rushy Fields


    Just wondering.... do i us baytocol on 2yr old heifers that were on the same piece of ground last summer orhave they immunety? can i use spot on as a general cover?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,100 ✭✭✭tanko


    nealger wrote: »
    Just wondering.... do i us baytocol on 2yr old heifers that were on the same piece of ground last summer orhave they immunety? can i use spot on as a general cover?

    If it's not the same ground they were on for their first year i wouldn't assume they have immunity. Cattle need to be on redwater prone ground when theyre calves to get immunity i think. I know it's expensive but I'd use the Bayticol again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,420 ✭✭✭✭_Brian


    yeah same as. apparently guinness stout (the little bottles) does the best job

    Ahh lads the whole Guinness being good was a mistake, then the iron content was measured years ago some knob recorded it with the decimal place wrong giving the impression that there was ten times the amount of iron in Guinness than there actually is. This spurred a whole "Guinness is good for you" campaign, you'll notice that they don't claim this any more nor have they for about 25 years.

    It seems engrained in the Irish that there is some magical strength gaining property to Guinness when in fact you may as well be giving the cow pints of Carlsberg.


  • Registered Users Posts: 530 ✭✭✭RD10


    Bought 10 replacement heifers at the back end of last year. One heifer with redwater last night. Seemed to have Caught her early according to vet. Just by chance i was standing behind her wen she urinated. I wouldnt have seen her otherwise.
    How long before they go downhill with it? fairly quickly i'd imagine?


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,582 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    You know the day that you are in a rush and only quickly count the cattle. That's the day that you will miss redwater.

    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,100 ✭✭✭tanko


    Didn't spot one for a few days, she was cold to touch and starting to get unsteady on her feet. Had to give her a blood transfusion from another cow and she recovered thankfully.


  • Registered Users Posts: 296 ✭✭massey woman


    Do any of you just get the cure
    Round here thats the solution
    Nationally there are several people with the "Cure of the Bleed" afaik


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  • Registered Users Posts: 571 ✭✭✭croot


    I had a weanling with it and the Vet told me that 1 in 10 will recover on their own. There is your cure.....


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,100 ✭✭✭tanko


    croot wrote: »
    I had a weanling with it and the Vet told me that 1 in 10 will recover on their own. There is your cure.....

    What happens the other 9?:rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 571 ✭✭✭croot


    tanko wrote: »
    What happens the other 9?:rolleyes:

    Vet treats them. What I meant is that the so called cure only works if that animal was always going to recover themselves


  • Registered Users Posts: 961 ✭✭✭Count Mondego


    Do any of you just get the cure
    Round here thats the solution
    Nationally there are several people with the "Cure of the Bleed" afaik


    What's the 'cure' you're referring to?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,513 ✭✭✭Limestone Cowboy


    croot wrote: »
    I had a weanling with it and the Vet told me that 1 in 10 will recover on their own. There is your cure.....

    Older or in calf animals animals are a lot harder to cure. We have a big mountain behind our house here and the auld fella often tells a story of a cow he bought years ago that got it right at the top of it. It's nearly a mile of a walk back to the crush and he knew she wouldn't make it so he left her where she was and she came around herself after a few days. Another neighbour was in the same situation a few years after and was bringing her down for the vet and she died before he got her as far as the crush. Moral of the story, with a lot of blood lost if you put them under too much pressure the heart is likely to give in before you ever get a chance to treat them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 571 ✭✭✭croot


    Older or in calf animals animals are a lot harder to cure. We have a big mountain behind our house here and the auld fella often tells a story of a cow he bought years ago that got it right at the top of it. It's nearly a mile of a walk back to the crush and he knew she wouldn't make it so he left her where she was and she came around herself after a few days. Another neighbour was in the same situation a few years after and was bringing her down for the vet and she died before he got her as far as the crush. Moral of the story, with a lot of blood lost if you put them under too much pressure the heart is likely to give in before you ever get a chance to treat them.

    Its a pain in the arse. We used to have it when I was young on a piece of land I planted forestry on last year. Haven't seen it in at least 15 years until this one two weeks ago.

    What the vet told me is the parasite gets into the red blood cells and the animals own immune system attacks it causing anaemia and eventually heart attack. Calves younger than 6 months don't really get it as there immune system is not developed and do not see the parasite as a threat. If they are exposed to it then they build natural immunity to it in future.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,100 ✭✭✭tanko


    I've heard that there's plenty of redwater about at the moment, when cattle are let out of sheds can be a dangerous time for it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,214 ✭✭✭High bike


    Bastard of a thing would be dead in a couple of days if not treated.Havent seen in in 20 yrs t.g


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 851 ✭✭✭Pidae.m


    Yee will laf at me with this one but my old lad swears by a female donkey with the cattle. He is 60 years of age isn't slow:) we bought a bit of ground a few years back we couldn't clear one bit of a glen and he made us stick a donkey there. So far no red water!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 961 ✭✭✭Count Mondego


    Pidae.m wrote: »
    Yee will laf at me with this one but my old lad swears by a female donkey with the cattle. He is 60 years of age isn't slow:) we bought a bit of ground a few years back we couldn't clear one bit of a glen and he made us stick a donkey there. So far no red water!

    You'd often see an auld donkey in with a group of cattle alright. Mentioned this trick to the father a few years ago and he claimed the donkey would be covered head to toe in ticks.


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