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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,527 ✭✭✭Paz-CCFC


    I'm looking into getting those 40 pint plastic kegs. There's a fairly cheap one for €45 (tap at the bottom), which I was thinking of getting. It has a two inch neck, though - would that require buying a keg cleaning brush to clean it, if dirt or mould ever sticks to the bottom? There's one with a four inch neck for €70 (plus, its tap is at the top and draws beer from the top, whereas the cheaper one does it from the bottom - not sure if this makes much of a difference), which would allow me to clean it with a normal cloth. Is the extra €25 worth not having to buy a bottling brush? These seem to cost €30+, but are there cheaper ones?

    What'd be the best way to chill a 40 pint keg? A bath of ice? I'm guessing that'd be harder with the tap at the bottom rather than the top.

    Just one more question - S30 cylinders v 8 gram CO2 cartridges. I know that, since they refill the S30s at less than half of its initial cost, you start saving after about two refills vs the cartridges. But how many cartridges would you use on a 40 pint keg (let's say it's to be carbonated as an average carbonated beer)? I've a Tap A Draft kit, as well, which only takes the cartridges, so I'd have to buy them anyway, which makes me think I'd be better off just sticking with them.

    Thanks.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    Tube wrote: »
    After 20 pages it has the potential to be a train wreck.
    Every train has the potential to be a train wreck. Don't like the risk? Stay off the train.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    Khannie wrote: »
    I genuinely don't think a human could accurately (i.e. with significantly > 50% accuracy) taste the difference between a home brewed wine that had done secondary in a standard plastic fermenting vessel versus one that had done secondary in glass.

    One of our more active members is a plastics expert and deals in plastics for a living. He swears plastic over the long term, like months, is a no-no. For primary it's fine as the beer/wine/cider is still producing its own gas, but after that it will absorb whatever it is exposed to.

    I don't know if I've ever tasted anything that was months in plastic. Most people I know will use bottles or cornies for long term storage/maturing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    kevc2 wrote: »
    Thanks for clearing that up, plastic bucket for primary is recommended though?

    I think "recommended" is too strong. "Acceptable" is more like it!


  • Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 37,485 Mod ✭✭✭✭Khannie


    Tube wrote: »
    One of our more active members is a plastics expert and deals in plastics for a living. He swears plastic over the long term, like months, is a no-no. For primary it's fine as the beer/wine/cider is still producing its own gas, but after that it will absorb whatever it is exposed to.

    I don't know if I've ever tasted anything that was months in plastic. Most people I know will use bottles or cornies for long term storage/maturing.

    Fair enough. Good to know.

    The longest I have left (or would leave) home brew wine in secondary is about 2 months before bottling.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    That reminds me... my own first attempt at cider is in a carboy in the shed for over 2 months now. It better be good!

    Apple juice came from Con Traas in Tipperary who supplies a lot of cider makers with juice. We're going to make it an annual thing, so I'm looking forward to having cider permanently in the shed!


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    BeerNut wrote: »
    Every train has the potential to be a train wreck. Don't like the risk? Stay off the train.

    Just giving my 2c. We created a section, Best Recipes, to avoid train wrecks. Poster must have seen recipe to completion, and been so happy with it that they have the intention of brewing it again if they haven't already.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    Tube wrote: »
    Poster must have seen recipe to completion, and been so happy with it that they have the intention of brewing it again if they haven't already.
    Great idea but sounds like a modding nightmare. I'm going with the suggestion of tasting notes and we'll see if it works.

    It's very quiet up there, guys. A sticky has to earn its keep.


  • Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 37,485 Mod ✭✭✭✭Khannie


    BeerNut wrote: »
    It's very quiet up there, guys. A sticky has to earn its keep.

    I'll add some stuff when I get the time.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 500 ✭✭✭kevc2


    I was in Ikea the other day and noticed they had 1l bottles with swing tops for €2.50:

    http://www.ikea.com/ie/en/catalog/products/30213552/


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  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    They may not be spec'd for carbonated drinks, though. Beware!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 500 ✭✭✭kevc2


    Good point! Going to try one of those prohibition kits and fill them with it


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,543 ✭✭✭Conmaicne Mara


    kevc2 wrote: »
    I was in Ikea the other day and noticed they had 1l bottles with swing tops for €2.50:

    http://www.ikea.com/ie/en/catalog/products/30213552/

    Aldi/Lidl had similiar last year, but they were only for water etc, plus they were $1.50 cheaper than Ikea! I wouldn't chance them for carbonated drinks, could get messy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 363 ✭✭tteknulp


    I got some from homebrew company 20 for €26 ,i have used many times ,well worth the money ,they have brown and clear ,750ml & 500ml


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,097 ✭✭✭Herb Powell


    What is the absolute minimum size pot you could get away with brewing an extract brew with?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 440 ✭✭eurofoxy


    i have done brew in a bag brew in a 15L pot and gotten roughly 8-10L of wort from it...

    but i think you can use a smaller pot than that just expect a smaller volume of wort at the end...


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    I've done a 20L extract batch in an 8L pot but I seriously wouldn't recommend it. Concentrated wort burnt on to the stainless steel hob didn't do me any favours with the missus. Being careful about boil-overs is just another thing to be worrying about.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,097 ✭✭✭Herb Powell


    Right, so the main problem is the wort burning if it's too concentrated?


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    No, it's the danger of filling the pot too full and it boiling over and then burning. You really need to watch it carefully as it nears the boil and reduce the heat if it starts to boil over.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,097 ✭✭✭Herb Powell


    BeerNut wrote: »
    No, it's the danger of filling the pot too full and it boiling over and then burning. You really need to watch it carefully as it nears the boil and reduce the heat if it starts to boil over.

    Ok, so, the smaller the pot, the harder it's going to be to keep it in that "range" ?


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  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,097 ✭✭✭Herb Powell


    Sound.

    Going to have to sort myself out with a tall pot so.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    Paint scraper (the one with the inbuilt stanley blade) will take anything off a hob.

    Only serious problem I've come across using a hob is that once the pot is bigger than a certain size the hob doesn't have the muscle to boil it. In my case I have 15L pots and the hob struggles.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    The worst case scenario is someone who managed to get concentrated wort all the way into the gas jets, and DME sets like rock. It meant taking the hob apart and soaking the bits in hot water.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    I rarely advocate electric hobs over gas, but for boil overs the flat glass of an electric hob can't be bettered.

    I've heard great things about induction hobs, and provided your cookware is compatible they're apparently better than electric or gas in every way.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    I used a portable induction hob at my last homebrew class -- worked really well, though I was only boiling 5L. I've heard they're very expensive, though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,543 ✭✭✭Conmaicne Mara


    Talked to a guy elsewhere that uses water cooler bottles to ferment his cider, they're 19 litres full. I thought it was a good idea if a person could get their hands on them.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 500 ✭✭✭kevc2


    I'm going to grab a 19l water cooler bottle tomorrow from work, I'd like to make some cheap cider. Would anyone know the exact amount of apple juice, water, and yeast to use in it? Also I'll be using general yeast that you can get from tesco.

    I currently have one of these brewing, I'll let you's know how it turns out: http://www.homebrewwest.ie/prohibition-high-alcohol-liqueur-coconut-rum-407-p.asp


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,823 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    No water. Just sanitise it and fill it (ish) with apple juice and sprinkle on a sachet of cider yeast. Add a cup of strong black tea if you want to give it a bit more body.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 14,748 ✭✭✭✭Lovely Bloke


    BeerNut wrote: »
    No water. Just sanitise it and fill it (ish) with apple juice and sprinkle on a sachet of cider yeast. Add a cup of strong black tea if you want to give it a bit more body.

    Would you not need to heat it a bit? Or if not doing that, prime the yeast first?


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