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Maritime News Thread

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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    Your posts (this and the preceeding ones) do you no favours. Nor does the action of those involved, from whom one would expect a more professional attitude. It certainly is no advert for any professional dive business.

    I’m not going to get into a debate about the legalities, but unless they had permission from the Receiver of the wreck those people had no legal right to do what they did. They committed an offence under section 56 of the Merchant Shipping (Salvage and Wreck) Act, 1993 and are are open to arrest and prosecution for their action even though they handed over what they removed. It is a pity they had not been caught on board - try telling the Gardai ‘But we were going to give it back’ and see how far that would get them.

    Those people are immature idiots and used a sad situation to garner cheap publicity and crappy PR for their dive business from gobdaws on Facebook. A big thumbs down from me.

    I think its worth your while taking a look at the photos associated with the article I linked to, showing photos of the dive team,. and ask yourself what uniform the person in the middle is wearing.
    wheel-7-390x285.jpg


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,108 ✭✭✭pedroeibar1


    I think its worth your while taking a look at the photos associated with the article I linked to, showing photos of the dive team,. and ask yourself what uniform the person in the middle is wearing.

    <modsnip>. The guy in the middle is wearing a highviz vest and for all everyone knows he could be a local binman. <modsnip>

    Even if the person in the middle is Santa Claus and those people took the gear from the Astrid without the instructions and consent of the Official Receiver they broke the law.

    [MOD]

    Let's keep the personal jibes out of it in future!

    [/MOD]


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,752 ✭✭✭flyingsnail


    The guy in the middle is wearing a highviz vest and for all everyone knows he could be a local binman.

    The guy in the hi-viz is wearing a customs uniform.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    Back then men were men.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/military-obituaries/naval-obituaries/10236118/Kenneth-Dancy.html
    The plight of Flying Enterprise, which kept the media on both sides of the Atlantic gripped for two weeks, began on Christmas Day 1951 when the 6,700-ton New York-registered Liberty Ship sailed into the worst storm to hit the Atlantic in 35 years. It was en route for New York from Hamburg with a cargo said to consist of pig iron, coffee and furniture. On board were 40 crew and 9 passengers.

    The ship was 300 miles off the southwest coast of Ireland when, on December 27, it developed a stress fracture across the deckhouse and down one side; one of its holds filled with water and it began to list badly. Its captain, 37-year-old Danish-born Kurt Carlsen, radioed for help and two US Navy vessels rushed to the scene. The crew and passengers jumped into the freezing seas and all but one were rescued. But Carlsen refused to abandon ship.

    On New Year’s Day, the newspapers featured a grainy photograph, snapped from a British Navy observation plane, of Carlsen, alone on the afterdeck, clinging to a railing and waving, as the ship, its port decks awash and its starboard propeller out of water, seemed about to be swallowed by the mountainous seas. Even so , Carlsen radioed that he was happily dining on currant buns, beer and Rhine wine. He was “a little tired”, he admitted, but otherwise everything was “fine and dandy”.

    On January 2, the Turmoil, a state-of-the-art tugboat which had been busy towing another storm-hit vessel to safety, set off from Falmouth to try to rendezvous with Flying Enterprise. A new storm began to blow up as the tugboat set out, but by January 4 it had drawn up alongside the stricken cargo vessel.

    Several attempts were made to throw a line to Carlsen as he leant perilously over the rail – but to no avail. Then, as the tug edged as close as possible, the 27-year old Dancy, not wearing a life jacket, jumped the gap between the two vessels, taking the tow line with him. The headline writers went wild and newsreel reports of “Dancy’s leap” were soon drawing crowds into the cinemas.

    With the line attached, the two vessels set out for Falmouth, followed by a small flotilla, while an army of reporters and photographers converged on the Cornish town to report their arrival.

    But Flying Enterprise’s ordeal was not over. Early in the morning on January 10, 40 miles short of Falmouth, the tow line snapped amid worsening weather, while the ship began rolling so badly her superstructure barely showed above the waves.

    A few hours later her stern plummeted, her bows pointed skywards, and just 39 minutes before she succumbed, Carlsen and Dancy hauled themselves up the funnel and jumped into the sea . The two men were picked up by Turmoil.

    Carlsen had become an international hero. He was feted in London and greeted with a ticker-tape parade on 5th Avenue in New York . On a smaller scale Dancy, too, was given due recognition. In his home town of Tunbridge Wells 20,000 people turned out to give him a hero’s welcome .

    But the story of the Flying Enterprise left a lot of questions unanswered – such as why Carlsen had decided to stay on board at such enormous risk to his own life .

    In 2002 a Danish television documentary speculated that the ship had not been carrying pig-iron as claimed, but zirconium rods (zirconium is a metal of vital importance in nuclear technology), suggesting that it was intended for use in the world’s first nuclear submarine, USS Nautilus. The documentary reported that, despite the intervening years, information about the cargo remains classified. The loss of the rods, it claimed, had put the launch of Nautilus back by a year.

    The second of four boys, Kenneth Roger Dancy was born in North London on December 1 1924. His father was a businessman and the family later moved to a small village in Kent where Kenneth’s parents ran a sub-post office and general store.

    He attended grammar school in north London until 1938, then the Skinners’ Grammar School, Tunbridge Wells, until 1941, when he joined the Merchant Navy as a Navigation Apprentice. He served on his first ship, Blackheath, for two years, and took part in convoys around the globe, winning an impressive clutch of campaign medals.

    On one occasion, in the English Channel, when both the ship in front of his and the one behind were torpedoed, he reckoned he had survived because the U-boat crew were reloading their torpedo tubes as his ship passed. On another occasion in the Indian Ocean his ship was attacked by a Japanese submarine, but he was off-watch and slept through the action.

    Dancy obtained his Master’s Certificate in 1950 and for some years was captain of a large tanker. He was on leave from his ship when the first mate of the Turmoil was taken ill, and he was asked to take his place to help in the rescue of Flying Enterprise. He had never been on a tug before.

    In 1956, he married Petronella van den Tempel, a Dutch woman, and two years later he gave up sailing and settled in the Netherlands, where he worked for Phillips Radio and latterly for IBM.

    Kenneth Dancy’s wife and two sons survive him. Captain Carlsen died in 1989.
    dancy_2641028b.jpg


    Kenneth Dancy, born December 1 1924, died August 3 2013


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,697 Mod ✭✭✭✭Tabnabs




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  • Registered Users Posts: 254 ✭✭Freedive Ireland


    Great footage,


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,697 Mod ✭✭✭✭Tabnabs


    Never let a woman drive:



    :pac:

    (Sound contains swearing and NSFW)


  • Registered Users Posts: 372 ✭✭jamesdiver


    Saw something similar in Killybegs a few years back. Bumper cars :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,944 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Tabnabs wrote: »
    Never let a woman drive:

    :pac:

    Ah here.

    I resemble that remark :mad:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    Ah tabby, that's not fair. The mechanical problems the ship experienced were caused by the ships age, and not due to any actions of the "driver".


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 275 ✭✭ex_infantry


    Tabnabs wrote: »
    Never let a woman drive:



    :pac:

    (Sound contains swearing and NSFW)
    what happened here? was it deliberately moved or what??


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,208 ✭✭✭✭JohnCleary


    Tabnabs wrote: »
    Never let a woman drive:



    :pac:

    (Sound contains swearing and NSFW)

    ... as the dole scroungers laugh on, dirty eejits


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    Coast Guard gives green light for salvage experts to lift tall ship off rocks

    Saturday, August 31, 2013

    The Coast Guard has given the green light for work to start on a major salvage operation on the stricken tall ship, Astrid.



    By Eoin English
    Preparatory work is expected to start in Kinsale, Co Cork, today for what is expected to be a three-week project.

    The news was confirmed yesterday almost five weeks after the historic Dutch sail-training vessel ran aground on rocks just east of Kinsale harbour.

    She was sailing as part of a flotilla from Oysterhaven to Kinsale when her engines failed. Strong onshore winds drove her on to the rocks.

    All 30 people on board the Astrid — including 23 young trainees — were saved during a dramatic rescue involving the RNLI, the coast guard, and local vessels.

    The 95-year-old vessel has remained stuck fast on the rocks since July 24.

    Following an initial inspection, which revealed substantial damage to its hull, the ship has been effectively written off.

    Following protracted negotiations, the ship’s insurers awarded the salvage contract to West Cork-based Atlantic Towage and Marine.

    Its detailed salvage and pollution control plan was submitted to the Coast Guard for review. It has now been cleared to proceed.

    Bere Island-based Atlantic Towage and Marine is one of Ireland’s leading towage and salvage firms.

    It will lead the operation but will draft in various specialist sub-contractors for certain elements.

    Atlantic Towage and Marine’s 30-tonne Ocean Bank tractor tug, driven by a powerful hi-tech propulsion system, is expected to arrive in Kinsale today to prepare for the operation.

    Several smaller boats will also be involved in preparing the Astrid to be lifted from the rocks.

    It is understood that masts and rigging will be cut before seawater is pumped from the vessel.

    Arrangements will also be made to remove some 3.5 tonnes of diesel which remains in two of the vessel’s four fuel tanks.

    The hull will then be secured before it is hoisted by a large floating crane, which is due to sail from Britain, on to a large recovery barge.

    Once the wreck is lashed to the barge, it will then be transported to a nearby port where it will be handed over to the ship’s insurers.
    © Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

    Great to see this happening.


  • Registered Users Posts: 372 ✭✭jamesdiver


    Even better that an Irish company is at the helm of the operation so to speak.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    http://www.thejournal.ie/tall-ship-astrid-salvage-1065216-Sep2013/?utm_source=shortlink
    Operation to lift the Astrid from the sea should be completed by next week

    Work to prepare the 95-year-old vessel for the salvage operation has been ongoing since the weekend. All aboard were rescued when she crashed on the rocks six weeks ago.
    THE WRECK OF the Tall Ship Astrid, which has been settled on rocks off the coast of Cork since the craft ran aground six weeks ago, will be removed from the shoreline by early next week, it is planned.

    All thirty people on board were rescued when the sail training vessel was forced onto the rocks near Kinsale after its engines failed on 24 July.

    The plan to salvage the 95-year-old tall ship was approved last week by the Irish Coast Guard; the operation will be carried out by the Bere Island-based Atlantic Towage and Marine company after a deal was agreed with the Astrid’s insurers.

    A huge crane that will lift the craft out of the water and onto a barge is being transported to Cork from the UK. Both are due to arrive at the wreck site tomorrow or on Thursday, after which it’s expected the 42-metre steel-hulled ship will be taken to dry dock for assessment.

    Work took place on Sunday to clear some of the ropes hanging from the rigging, operations officer with the Coast Guard Hugh Barry told TheJournal.ie.

    Divers also inserted wedges between the ship’s fuel containers to secure them and to ensure there will be no leakage of diesel when the lifting operation takes place, Barry said.

    Additional dives are expected to take place at the site today to further prepare the vessel ahead of the crane’s arrival.

    “Once the crane gets here we’re looking at a one- to three-day period before it’s out of the water,” Barry said.

    “There could be snags along the way – removing the anchor and so on – and it’s all on the proviso of weather conditions working out, of course.”

    Experts will assess the extent of the damage to the ship’s hull once it arrives in dry dock, but it is not expected the craft will sail again.

    Built in The Netherlands in 1918, the Astrid was allegedly used for drug-smuggling at one point. It was found abandoned off the English coast in the early 1980s, and was later overhauled and relaunched.


  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Jambo



    I see the sheerlegs GPS Atlas and the Tug Napia are just off Beachy head at present en route to the site with an ETA of friday night @ 22:00.

    GPS Atlas was involved in raising the trawlers Pere Charles and Maggie B - back in 2007


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,697 Mod ✭✭✭✭Tabnabs




    This kind of **** makes me want to say all sorts of nasty **** about these morons. As if life isn't hard enough for the average sailor...

    **** you and your allahu akbar :mad:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    Allah my left one. These idiots are no different to the plonkers that drop blocks onto passing vehicles from overbridges.


  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Jambo


    Allah my left one. These idiots are no different to the plonkers that drop blocks onto passing vehicles from overbridges.

    You get plonkers doing that on the Manchester and Corinth canals too,


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,944 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Are they just taking pot shots for the fun of it? Or trying to knock a container off to steal/plunder it? Either way, can't be much fun for the guys on the ship.... :mad:


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Are they just taking pot shots for the fun of it? Or trying to knock a container off to steal/plunder it? Either way, can't be much fun for the guys on the ship.... :mad:

    Apparently trying to disrupt Suez Traffic.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,493 ✭✭✭long range shooter


    Tabnabs wrote: »


    This kind of **** makes me want to say all sorts of nasty **** about these morons. As if life isn't hard enough for the average sailor...

    **** you and your allahu akbar :mad:

    thats the day you would love sailors armed with a 50cal sniper rifle;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Jambo


    Jambo wrote: »
    I see the sheerlegs GPS Atlas and the Tug Napia are just off Beachy head at present en route to the site with an ETA of friday night @ 22:00.

    GPS Atlas was involved in raising
    the trawlers Pere Charles and Maggie B - back in 2007

    According to @corkcoast on Twitter Astrid has been raised and is now heading towards Kinsale


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭murphym7


    Couple of good photos that Fergal linked to over on Sailing & Boating of the Astrid being raised.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    murphym7 wrote: »
    Couple of good photos that Fergal linked to over on Sailing & Boating of the Astrid being raised.

    They righted her, and put her on a barge yesterday, and next step is the MCIB tomorrow. After that the intention is to bring her to the UK where insurers will inspect her. Damage appears limited to the keel from the bow back 15 feet, and again at the midpoint, but I have seen worse repaired.
    9717989391_008216cf9e_c.jpg
    9721146498_d73c7ab8b2_c.jpg
    SDC13612 by seamuscor, on Flickr


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,480 ✭✭✭✭Cookie_Monster


    doesn't take the weed and algae long


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    doesn't take the weed and algae long

    Indeed, that side is quite clean compared to the side that was uppermost.

    9717984943_c4b5d98438_c.jpg
    SDC13602 by seamuscor, on Flickr


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,905 ✭✭✭Storm 10


    She is in great condition considering she has been rocking and rolling there since the grounding, good power wash and she would look great, like said the weed does not take long to grow. Thanks for the pictures Goldie


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭murphym7


    Storm 10 wrote: »
    She is in great condition considering she has been rocking and rolling there since the grounding, good power wash and she would look great, like said the weed does not take long to grow. Thanks for the pictures Goldie

    Was thinking the same, a good power wash and a lick of paint she would look great. Can't believe the masts stayed stepped and the bowsprit seems intact too.

    God only knows how much it would cost to get her back to normal below decks though. Engine room, accomodation, nav and electronics, wiring. Probably some plating to be done around the keel and topsides. We shall see I suppose.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Jambo


    Taken from the Maritime Executive,
    The wrecked Costa Concordia cruise ship could be upright again next week, nearly two years after the liner capsized and killed at least 30 people off the Italian coast.

    The giant vessel, which has lain partly submerged in shallow waters off the Tuscan island of Giglio since the accident in January 2012, will be rolled off the seabed and onto underwater platforms.

    Workers will look for the bodies of two people, an Italian and an Indian unaccounted for since the disaster, as machines haul the 114,000-tonne ship upright and underwater cameras comb the seabed.

    The exact day of the Concordia's rotation - known as parbuckling - has yet to be set, but on Wednesday Civil Protection Commissioner Franco Gabrielli said Monday was likely.

    Also Read: Italy Approves Unprecedented Attempt to Parbuckle Wrecked Costa Concordia

    The Costa Concordia hit a rock when it manoeuvred too close to the island, prompting a chaotic evacuation of more than 4,000 passengers and crew, in one of the most dramatic marine accidents in recent history.

    Divers have pumped 18,000 tonnes of cement into bags below the ship to support it and prevent it from breaking up in an operation which is expected to last 8-10 hours and is part of a salvage operation estimated to cost at least $300 million.

    A buoyancy device acting "like a neck brace for an injured patient" will hold together the ship's bow, and fishing nets will catch debris as it rises from beneath the ship, said Nicholas Sloane, senior salvage master at Titan Salvage.

    The salvage team will go through the ship cabin by cabin and had over items found on board to the Italian state prosecutor, and the vessel will be towed away to be dismantled.

    Four Costa Concordia crew members and a Costa Cruises company official were sentenced to jail in July for their part in the accident, and the ship's captain Francesco Schettino remains on trial for manslaughter and causing the loss of the ship.

    The captain is accused of abandoning ship before all crew and passengers had been rescued. A coastguard's angry phone order to him - "Get back on board, damn it!" - became a catchphrase in Italy after the accident.

    http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/Costa-Concordia-Parbuckling-Likely-to-Begin-on-Monday-2013-09-11/


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