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The Thylacine Thread

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Comments

  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 59,589 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    Crossing all my digits.... I would love to know they were still out there, somewhere. Though I'd add places like New Guinea to the list. Apparently local tribes have said they've seen them when shown pictures.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Indeed, they call it "dobsegna". And New Guinea was home to other interesting species in prehistoric times. Wouldn´t it be cool if they found, say, a Protemnodon tumbuna, aka short-legged, non-hopping, rainforest-dwelling kangaroo? 
    68388ac4e38418dae4dfb32403458354.jpg
    (Weirdly, the tall guy is also a Protemnodon, except from a species that could hop AND was taller than a man).


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 59,589 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Indeed, they call it "dobsegna".
    You know, I just knew you would know the name involved. #bows

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Interesting paper on the pre-Pleistocene fossil record of thylacinids and how the Tasmanian tiger/wolf came to be:

    https://peerj.com/articles/7457/

    fig-5-1x.jpg


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Although not new (it was found in 1966), as far as I can tell this spectacular find is little known and seldom mentioned. The thylacine remains have been preserved in an Australian cave for 4000 to 5000 years!

    nullarbor.jpg

    The-mainland-thylacine-of-Australia-This-mummified-carcase-was-found-in-a-cave-on-the.png

    http://www.naturalworlds.org/thylacine/palaeontology/prehistoric/prehistoric_range_4.htm

    The specimen is very interesting because its from a mainland thylacine- which went extinct before the Tasmanian population, shortly after the introduction of the dingo by humans.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Can we really clone the thylacine?



  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Previously unknown, preserved thylacine pelt discovered in New Zealand:

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-29/tasmanian-tiger-thylacine-colourful-pelt-from-nz-reveals/12597682

    9246960-3x2-xlarge.jpg?v=6

    12597464-3x2-xlarge.jpg?v=2


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,247 ✭✭✭ igCorcaigh




  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    igCorcaigh wrote: »

    Hopefully will turn out to be true, but I am very cautious about this. Tasmania has high roadkill incidence. It would beg the question of how thylacines went for so long without ever being hit by a car...


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 59,589 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    https://twitter.com/s_maunder/status/1364080020877053954

    Sadly it appears to be misidentification. I still reckon if any are around it'll be in somewhere like New Guinea where they roamed once and is far less crowded with people and roads etc.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Wibbs wrote: »
    https://twitter.com/s_maunder/status/1364080020877053954

    Sadly it appears to be misidentification. I still reckon if any are around it'll be in somewhere like New Guinea where they roamed once and is far less crowded with people and roads etc.

    I agree.

    Meanwhile, a bit overshadowed by the thylacine fiasco, the black browed babbler (Malacocincla perspiscillata) a bird thought extinct for 180 years has just been rediscovered alive. That's abour 100 years longer than the thylacine's been officially extinct!
    It was previously known only from a specimen collected in Borneo in the 19th century:

    464px--Naturalis_Biodiversity_Center_-_RMNH.AVES.89412_-_Malacocincla_perspicillata_%28Bonaparte%2C_1850%29_-_Black-browed_Babbler_-_specimen_-_video.webm.jpg

    The live bird:

    _117311722_mediaitem117311491.jpg


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