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Handy thread of quick cooking questions & tips

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  • 06-05-2012 9:47pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭


    I was thinking it might be good to have a thread for all the little questions you have from time to time without starting a new thread every time.

    My question: I bake or fry chicken (depending on the cut) and then have it for my breakfast in the morning. However, anytime I leave it sit on a plate in the fridge, there is always some slimy fat at the bottom of the plate when I get to it in the morning. Any foolproof way to avoid this?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,658 ✭✭✭✭The Sweeper


    Hmmm not really, though there are some measures you can take. You can remove all skin from the chicken before cooking, and trim any fat. You can grill instead of frying or baking, and add no oil.

    But what you'll end up with in the morning is pretty much chicken jerky.

    Alternatively, poach the chicken, drain it well, leave it on one plate to cool and when cool, transfer it to a second plate with none of the juices before you refrigerate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,413 ✭✭✭TeletextPear


    Maybe if you put greaseproof paper under it, would that soak up the fat?


  • Registered Users Posts: 39,122 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    Maybe if you put greaseproof paper under it, would that soak up the fat?
    Greeseproof paper doesn't soak oil up too well. Hence the name.

    Kitchen roll would do a better job.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators Posts: 35,214 Mod ✭✭✭✭pickarooney


    Do you reheat the chicken in the morning or eat it cold?


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,813 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    That's not grease - it's delicious, set chicken juice (ok maybe a little fat too but mostly juice/jelly, I'd say)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭Kimia


    I eat the chicken cold.


  • Registered Users Posts: 863 ✭✭✭GastroBoy


    If your not already, use free range chicken. Much less fat content then the pumped up factory birds.


  • Registered Users Posts: 39,122 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    GastroBoy wrote: »
    If your not already, use free range chicken. Much less fat content then the pumped up factory birds.
    Afaik free range isn't any lower in fat


  • Registered Users Posts: 863 ✭✭✭GastroBoy


    Mellor wrote: »
    Afaik free range isn't any lower in fat

    Yes, it is. Considerably lower in fat actually.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,090 ✭✭✭livinsane


    Mellor wrote: »
    Afaik free range isn't any lower in fat

    According to research I saw on the River Cottage show:

    Intensively farmed chicken is highest in fat and lowest in Omega 3.

    Corn fed chicken has less fat but is still considerably high (from the corn diet) and has higher levels of Omega 3.

    Free range chicken has lowest levels of fat and highest levels of Omega 3.

    The food scientist consulted said family dependance on cheap chicken and eggs is a real problem for the brain development of children.


    Sorry to go slightly off topic but to offer an answer to the original question, I think the kitchen roll suggestion is the best!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,344 ✭✭✭Thoie


    Kimia wrote: »
    I was thinking it might be good to have a thread for all the little questions you have from time to time without starting a new thread every time.

    My question: I bake or fry chicken (depending on the cut) and then have it for my breakfast in the morning. However, anytime I leave it sit on a plate in the fridge, there is always some slimy fat at the bottom of the plate when I get to it in the morning. Any foolproof way to avoid this?

    And back to the original question...

    Stick a fork across the plate, put chicken on the fork, and it lifts it off the plate enough to stop slime gathering around the chicken. If you want you can put a sheet of kitchen roll under the fork, then dump that in the bin and use the same plate and fork for eating the chicken.


  • Registered Users Posts: 39,122 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    livinsane wrote: »
    According to research I saw on the River Cottage show:

    Intensively farmed chicken is highest in fat and lowest in Omega 3.

    Corn fed chicken has less fat but is still considerably high (from the corn diet) and has higher levels of Omega 3.

    Free range chicken has lowest levels of fat and highest levels of Omega 3.
    I read something similar that suggested that the the variation in the fat levels is in the skin. But the meat is the same.

    So as a whole, a free range bird is lower in fat, but free range breast fillets aren't much different.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,361 ✭✭✭Gloomtastic!


    According to Heston, the juice seeps out of the meat because we cook it at too high a temperature.

    He suggests cooking at 90degrees. It keeps the juices (and flavour) in the meat. Google it if you don't believe me! ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 790 ✭✭✭LaChatteGitane


    That's not grease - it's delicious, set chicken juice (ok maybe a little fat too but mostly juice/jelly, I'd say)

    Indeed. Mainly gelatinous meat juices.
    Proper chicken stock would have a similar consistency.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,595 ✭✭✭The Lovely Muffin


    I was hoping to cook this for lunch tomorrow, but don't have any oyster sauce, could I use fish sauce instead? Would it affect the flavour much?

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/10360/beef-mushroom-and-greens-stirfry


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭Curry Addict


    I was hoping to cook this for lunch tomorrow, but don't have any oyster sauce, could I use fish sauce instead? Would it affect the flavour much?

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/10360/beef-mushroom-and-greens-stirfry

    yes it would affect the flavor way too much. fish sauce is essentially flavored salt so you would be adding another salt element making it too salty. its a simple recipe so missing one of the dominant flavors will make it bland and horrible tbh.
    nearly all supermarkets stock oyster sauce and its relatively cheap so pick some up today!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,034 ✭✭✭Loire


    Kimia wrote: »
    I was thinking it might be good to have a thread for all the little questions you have from time to time without starting a new thread every time.

    My question: I bake or fry chicken (depending on the cut) and then have it for my breakfast in the morning. However, anytime I leave it sit on a plate in the fridge, there is always some slimy fat at the bottom of the plate when I get to it in the morning. Any foolproof way to avoid this?

    That's some constitution....I can only imagine what you have for dinner!


  • Registered Users Posts: 790 ✭✭✭LaChatteGitane


    Loire wrote: »
    That's some constitution....I can only imagine what you have for dinner!

    Why ? It's certainly not as rich as a fry up.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,595 ✭✭✭The Lovely Muffin


    yes it would affect the flavor way too much. fish sauce is essentially flavored salt so you would be adding another salt element making it too salty. its a simple recipe so missing one of the dominant flavors will make it bland and horrible tbh.
    nearly all supermarkets stock oyster sauce and its relatively cheap so pick some up today!
    Thanks so much, I didn't realise fish sauce is flavoured salt.

    Will pick up some oyster sauce today.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭Kimia


    Loire wrote: »
    That's some constitution....I can only imagine what you have for dinner!

    What's wrong with it? :confused:


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,213 ✭✭✭Sea Filly


    That's not grease - it's delicious, set chicken juice (ok maybe a little fat too but mostly juice/jelly, I'd say)

    +1, love that gelatinous stuff!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,595 ✭✭✭The Lovely Muffin


    I'm thinking of making this at the weekend, but am looking for a white wine to cook with the meat, I normally drink Blossom Hill Californian White, but I don't know if it would work with the meat, as has a sweet-ish, I think.

    http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/pork-recipes/pork-belly-roast-1

    Can anyone recommend a wine to use please? Preferably nothing expensive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,813 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    I'm thinking of making this at the weekend, but am looking for a white wine to cook with the meat, I normally drink Blossom Hill Californian White, but I don't know if it would work with the meat, as has a sweet-ish, I think.

    http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/pork-recipes/pork-belly-roast-1

    Can anyone recommend a wine to use please? Preferably nothing expensive.

    I'd go to your local friendly independent wine seller and ask for an inexpensive, dry white wine for cooking with (I'd pay no less than €5 and no more than €8) - you won't get advice in a supermarket!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,595 ✭✭✭The Lovely Muffin


    I'd go to your local friendly independent wine seller and ask for an inexpensive, dry white wine for cooking with (I'd pay no less than €5 and no more than €8) - you won't get advice in a supermarket!
    Would an off licence be any good? I don't mean Tesco or Dunnes etc.

    There are no independent wine sellers near me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,813 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Would an off licence be any good? I don't mean Tesco or Dunnes etc.

    There are no independent wine sellers near me.

    Independent off licence/wine seller is what I meant.


  • Registered Users Posts: 201 ✭✭whistlingtitan


    Keep the juices on the plate foe sauce that night mmmmmm


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,595 ✭✭✭The Lovely Muffin


    Back again :o

    I'm making this for dinner tonight and wanted to have some spicy roast vegetables with it - http://eatlikeagirl.com/2009/07/12/spiced-roast-pork-belly/

    I was going to use up some vegs I have in the fridge, carrots, 1/2 red pepper, baby potatoes (preferably unpeeled) and celery.

    I have some frozen vegs too which I'd like to use, although I would have to cook them in a pot before roasting them, wouldn't I?

    The frozen vegs I want to use are garden peas, broccoli and green beans.

    I was thinking of using paprika and chilli powder or chilli flakes on the vegetable along with a dash of dark soy sauce, would this work with the vegs? If not, can anyone recommend a spice mix for them please.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭Kimia


    That recipe looks yum!

    Why would you have to boil the frozen veg first? I'd say they'd be grand - i'd just put them in a different pan to the fresh veg because they'll take longer.

    I would add a drop of honey to your spice mix. Enjoy!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,595 ✭✭✭The Lovely Muffin


    Kimia wrote: »
    That recipe looks yum!

    Why would you have to boil the frozen veg first? I'd say they'd be grand - i'd just put them in a different pan to the fresh veg because they'll take longer.

    I would add a drop of honey to your spice mix. Enjoy!
    I would have thought that I'd need to boil the frozen veg because they wouldn't be the same if roasted from frozen, maybe I am wrong though. It was my first time doing roast vegetables so I was a bit unsure.

    As it happens, I ended up not using the frozen vegs as I forgot about them :o

    I used baby potatoes, carrots, half a red pepper, shallots and garlic. Although they were too spicy as I used paprika and cayenne pepper.

    The pork belly was nice, but I didn't like the fennel, probably because I used too much and didn't grind them down, it was like I had put perfume on the meat to be honest. I ended up not being able to eat my dinner as there was too much fennel and spice for me unfortunately.

    The one thing I would say to anyone who's gonna try this dish - is to have some gravy or something with it as it's quite dry on it's own.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭Kimia


    Ah no, that's a shame. At least you've figured out how fennel tastes now - it's always good when you have that knowledge because it'll build your palette, allowing you to imagine what things taste like before you try them - and even better, you'll soon be able to imagine what things taste like after you mix them together! :)


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