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  • http://vimeo.com/m/76364379
    Just a short flim, not much info but, man, what a life!!

    what a place to live and what a way to live...




  • I genuinely think I'm going to end up living that kind of life. If I'm only half as capable as that gent I'll be a happy man.
    "It's not that I don't like people, I do, I just don't like swarms of them!" Classic.






  • The Last Trapper (Le Dernier Trappeur) A French Canadian movie dubbed into English. Terrible dialogue, woeful music, but some of the most spectacular scenery you'll see on TV.
    He's a 50-year-old trapper named Norman Winter, and he lives with a Nahanni woman, Nebaska. Norman has always been a trapper, with no need of the things that civilisation has to offer. He and his dogs live simply on what they produce from hunting and fishing. Norman made his sledge, snowshoes, cabin and canoe with wood and leather that he took from the forest and that Nebaska tanned, in the traditional style, just like the Sekani did in early times, using the tannin in animal brains, then by smoking the skin. To move around, Norman uses his dogs. They're quiet, and with them he's ready for action at the slightest sign of life, but all the while attentive to the majestic grandeur of the territories he passes through. That's why Norman Winter is a trapper. The Great North is inside him and Nebaska carries it within her, in her blood, for the taiga is the mother of its people...

    Norman and Nebaska know that a land only lives through its intimate links with the animals, plants, rivers, winds and even colours. Their wisdom comes from the deep and special relationship they enjoy with nature. When Norman Winter follows an animal's trail, he studies it for a long time, to understand the animal's exact perception of its environment. He knows how to free himself from the immobile image that a land evokes, then to "enter" it by comprehending what it is. To understand that is to sense the unmistakable breathing of the earth, it's to understand why Norman Winter is the last trapper and why he turned his back on modern life, that he compares to a slope we slip down blindly. Norman is a sort of philosopher convinced that the notion of sharing and exchange with nature is essential to the equilibrium of that odd animal at the top of the food chain: Man.

    That's what this film, made over 12 months, will present, overlaying treks on horseback during the Indian summer and by sledge in the depths of winter, a canoe ride down a raging river at the bottom of a majestic canyon and attacks by grizzly bears and wolves...




  • pdf file on how to connect 5x50 gallon barrels together to harvest rainwater
    http://fyi.uwex.edu/rainbarrels/files/2012/06/How-To-Five-barrel-system-instructions.pdf


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  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    pdf file on how to connect 5x50 gallon barrels together to harvest rainwater
    http://fyi.uwex.edu/rainbarrels/files/2012/06/How-To-Five-barrel-system-instructions.pdf

    Nice pdf but the guy obviously hasn't got a clue. You need more than a small hole to let the air out even a half inch hole isn't really big enough. If the air doesn't come out of the barrels quick enough you loose water to the overflow which is also missing. 6/10 :)

    Now if you have a tiny roof or never get more than a mm of rain an hour a small hole might just be OK.




  • Apologies if posted before "As far as my feet will carry me" true story about a German soldier who escaped a Russian gulag after ww2 , took him 3 years to get home, havnt watch it yet , the whole movie seems to be on youtube. will get the book , sounds like a good read.






  • http://www.youtube.com/user/MAINEPREPPER

    The Maine Prepper. An ex-military lad with a passion for preppering and "living free". His sidekick is the Patriot Nurse (!). Some good info and some political ramblings.









  • Imagine an island so secluded there's no electricity, there are no paved roads and in many cases, no plumbing. That island - called Lasqueti - is home to 400 people and less than an hour away from Vancouver.16x9 traveled there to see what it's like to live off the grid.


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  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    http://www.youtube.com/user/MAINEPREPPER

    The Maine Prepper. An ex-military lad with a passion for preppering and "living free". His sidekick is the Patriot Nurse (!). Some good info and some political ramblings.

    Been watching him for awhile, lots of good info alright and imo, infinity easy to listen to. Like an interesting grandpa Simpson




  • Some good solid information on a wealth of Forestry topics (USA) to be found at one of the Federal Highway Administration sites Forest Service Publications List

    There are loads of manuals not specific to S&SS but I found the following ones very interesting:

    An Ax to Grind: A Practical Ax Manual
    Crosscut saws - four documents
    Hand Drilling and Breaking Rock for Wilderness Trail Maintenance
    Portable Backcountry Rigging Tripod
    Handtools for Trail Work

    All in HTML and as pdf's if you want to keep any on a USB key.

    Just been reading "Low-Impact Food Hoists" totally irrelevant for Ireland but fascinating all the same.




  • A lot of their videos are available on Youtube too. Nerdish, but very interesting viewing.




  • Which place would you rather be: in a cave, wondering where the food for tomorrow would come from, or with a group of people living in their homes, working together to overcome their problems? Even the most individualistic of survivalists shouldn't find the choice too hard to make.

    If you think you might be a "back-pack survivalist", this article is well worth reading:

    http://duncanlong.com/science-fiction-fantasy-short-stories/backpack.htm




  • http://lifehacker.com/this-1950s-video-guide-teaches-you-to-live-off-the-land-1535354316
    From the 50's and heavily USA-centric (isn't everything these days?!), but some good tips in this video.




  • Watched this video over the last couple of nights and thought it was quite good. Its an hour and a half long and follows a family through a worldwide pandemic which wipes out millions
    http://youtu.be/Eym4PwHmUvI




  • Out of curiosity, would the shelters used in Britain in WW2 be of any value today? You know the Morrison shelter, I think it was built from a kit and people dug them into their gardens.

    regards
    Stovepipe




  • A_couple_sleeping_in_a_Morrison_shelter_during_the_Second_World_War._D2055.jpg
    Morrison shelter

    vs

    9.jpg
    Anderson shelter

    According to wikipedia:
    The Anderson shelters performed well under blast and ground shock, because they had good connectivity and ductility, which meant that they could absorb a great deal of energy through plastic deformation without falling apart (This was in marked contrast to other trench shelters which used concrete for the sides and roof, which were inherently unstable when disturbed by the effects of an explosion - if the roof slab lifted, the walls fell in under the static earth pressure; if the walls were pushed in, the roof would be unsupported at one edge and would fall). However, when the pattern of all night alerts became established, it was realised that in winter Anderson shelters were cold damp holes in the ground and often flooded in wet weather, and so their occupancy factor would be poor. This led to the development of the indoor Morrison shelter.




  • Over 6,000 pounds of food per year, on 1/10 acre located just 15 minutes from downtown Los Angeles. The Dervaes family grows over 400 species of plants, 4,300 pounds of vegetable food, 900 chicken and 1,000 duck eggs, 25 lbs of honey, plus seasonal fruits throughout the year.

    More info at http://urbanhomestead.org



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  • Fascinating. :)




  • Two questions: is that really a tenth of an acre? How do they rejuvenate the soil?

    regards
    Stovepipe




  • Stovepipe wrote: »
    Two questions: is that really a tenth of an acre? How do they rejuvenate the soil?

    regards
    Stovepipe

    Hi stovepipe, have you had a chance to check out the website?

    On the facts and stats page they mention that the area is 3,900 square feet which I think comes to one tenth of an acre.

    You can see their page here for some of their growing methods. The website said it apparently took over twenty years to get the soil exactly how they wanted it. I do know they keep chickens and goats - the bedding from the chickens makes for excellent compost, goats are also excellent for manuring soil if they move them around sufficiently.

    The facts and stats page also lists some of their composting methods, namely:
    Making Using EM Bokashi
    Vermicomposting
    Composting food, garden and green waste
    Brewing compost teas
    Anyone know what Bokashi is? :-D

    The son also manufactures biodiesel - one of the byproducts of this is glycerin which is biodegradable and can be composted also.

    It's really amazing to consider what they've achieved and now all us city dwellers no longer have any excuse not to break out the window boxes and container gardens and get growing. :)




  • their productivity is astonishing! I was thinking the site looked bigger than one-tenth of an acre. They're brilliant.

    regards
    Stovepipe




  • Stovepipe wrote: »
    their productivity is astonishing! I was thinking the site looked bigger than one-tenth of an acre. They're brilliant.

    regards
    Stovepipe

    Hi Stovepipe. You're right inasmuch as the site on which the house is situated is over this plus I don't think they include the animal enclosures in their garden space so you'd probably need a bit more than this but it's very inspiring.

    After having a closer look at the website today I see that they keep worms for vermiculture purposes (gets your compost ready in a fraction of the time as I'm sure you know) and also use rabbits for manure, which I understand is the best kind and God knows there's no shortage of bunnies!

    With our Survivalists heads on, this is also excellent news. A smaller area which you farm intensively is a hell of a lot easier to conceal and guard than some huge field!

    Having said this the home isn't entirely self sustaining - the solar panels provide most but not all of their energy needs, and they have to be extremely conservative with water. (See the video for the ancient clay jar method they use to seep water gradually into the soil). They often take their goats out to graze on communal ground.

    Still anyone with a half acre allotment now has no excuse! :)




  • http://www.survivalfirstaidkits.net.au/ebooks

    First Aid Emergency Handbook 5th edition, available free for a limited time. Register and they send an email with a link to a pdf download.




  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    http://www.survivalfirstaidkits.net.au/ebooks

    First Aid Emergency Handbook 5th edition, available free for a limited time. Register and they send an email with a link to a pdf download.

    Very useful, many thanks chief.




  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    http://www.survivalfirstaidkits.net.au/ebooks

    First Aid Emergency Handbook 5th edition, available free for a limited time. Register and they send an email with a link to a pdf download.

    Downloaded also :)




  • A series on Irish Netflix that I've been enjoying lately is Life Below Zero http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/life-below-zero/

    There's also a documentary, Hillbilly Blood, on US Netflix that I'd like to watch...

    http://instantwatcher.com/titles/197755


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  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    A series on Irish Netflix that I've been enjoying lately is Life Below Zero http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/life-below-zero/

    There's also a documentary, Hillbilly Blood, on US Netflix that I'd like to watch...

    http://instantwatcher.com/titles/197755

    Tabnabs,

    Thank you so much for this, I watched the first two episodes of Life below Zero last night and loved it!

    I very much enjoyed following the American guy who married into an Inuit family and still uses a huskie drawn sled to get around. That ice fishing looks very treacherous!

    It's a shame in a way because if they all weren't so far north of the Arctic circle they could grow all their own food with much less expenditure of effort.

    Still it's wonderful to see people living so self sufficiently.


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