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How much is a Personal Trainer?

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  • 09-07-2011 1:14am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,271 ✭✭✭


    I have just had a quote for prices for a personal trainer. He is charging €960 (€120 initial consultation and €70 a week) for a 12 week training programme in which he would meet me twice a week. The price seems really high (The best hotel gym and spa in the town costs €650 for the whole year) but I don't know if this is realistic or not. I am not in Dublin or Cork but he is the only PT in the county.
    I would appreciate advice on what prices are realistic.


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Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    40 quid a sesh sounds alright, but considering its a once off payment you should try to get it for less.

    If he's got a good reputation and has obtained good results for his clients, I don't think it's too outrageous.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,435 ✭✭✭The Davestator


    Some top pt's in Ireland charrge anything up to 250 a session. The price is only good if the trainer is. Ask for references from their clients before signing up.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    Some top pt's in Ireland charrge anything up to 250 a session. The price is only good if the trainer is. Ask for references from their clients before signing up.

    You're sh!tting me??


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,435 ✭✭✭The Davestator


    Two that I know anyway. They'll lower it for packages but not for just 1 session.
    They're both Multi talented I.e. Physio, Pt etc so can improve a client in a few different areas.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 31 Westcoast Thugs


    Some top pt's in Ireland charrge anything up to 250 a session. The price is only good if the trainer is. Ask for references from their clients before signing up.

    Is it the incredible hulk thats training you its a f*** joke

    40euros is the normal price :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 63 ✭✭didka


    Can you arrange weekly payment? I wouldn't be happy paying this for somebody I haven't worked with to be honest. The price for session is very good, but there is no way I would pay this unless I had few sessions with the trainer and happy with it, plus discuss what if you have to skip week or two (life happens, you get sick, someone gets married, you win a month holiday).

    Actually, I wouldn't pay this at once.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley



    40euros is the normal price :)

    it's actually not. Once off fee, could be anything from 50-75+.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,435 ✭✭✭The Davestator


    Is it the incredible hulk thats training you its a f*** joke

    40euros is the normal price :)

    40 is not the normal price actually and I'm not paying it, I said I know pt's who charge that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,271 ✭✭✭annascott


    He has also offered me a reduced package where he would only meet once every two weeks for €720 - same €120 + €50 a week. I don't understand how he can charge for the weeks when he wouldn't see me. Also, am I still expected to pay for gym membership too? Without it, I don't see how he can train me. I have a huge amount of weight to lose after giving up smoking and feeling like I will do myself permanent damage if I don't get into shape soon, but I really can't afford this.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 21,270 Mod ✭✭✭✭Brian?


    annascott wrote: »
    I have just had a quote for prices for a personal trainer. He is charging €960 (€120 initial consultation and €70 a week) for a 12 week training programme in which he would meet me twice a week. The price seems really high (The best hotel gym and spa in the town costs €650 for the whole year) but I don't know if this is realistic or not. I am not in Dublin or Cork but he is the only PT in the county.
    I would appreciate advice on what prices are realistic.

    If he's the only PT in the county, it's no wonder he can charge that. Supply and demand.

    If I were you, I'd join the gym and have a go yourself. Weight loss is not rocket science, no matter what some people would have you believe. As the saying goes: its simple but not easy.

    Have a look at the stickies above for an idea on nutrition, at the end of the day that's the key to losing weight.

    If after a couple of months of eating better and excercising more you don't get the results you want, maybe then look at getting a PT.

    they/them/theirs


    And so on, and so on …. - Slavoj Žižek




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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    The more you have to lose, the easier it is, the less need there is for a trainer (that is of course unless the money you've sunk into it and the fact you're going to see someone will be what motivates you).

    It's literally just a case of establishing a base line of allowable calories, meal plans and what to eat (which you can find out here for free). And then showing up consistently to the gym 3-4x per week and spending 60-90 minutes on the floor working out (which is 100% down to you) :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,117 ✭✭✭SanoVitae


    Hanley wrote: »
    The more you have to lose, the easier it is, the less need there is for a trainer

    This is 100% true. Simplying going for daily walks and making some small nutritional changes will result in rapid weight loss initially for the very overweight.
    Hanley wrote: »
    And then showing up consistently to the gym 3-4x per week and spending 60-90 minutes on the floor working out (which is 100% down to you) :)

    Many people hire personal trainers simply because they know they won't go to the gym otherwise. When they have someone waiting on them, it gives them no option to skip the gym.

    Sadly, many personal trainers exploit this and basically act as the world's most expensive babysitters, sticking a client on a threadmill and chatting with them about anything except exercise & nutrition for the entire duration of the session.

    OP - if you do decide to hire a personal trainer, I highly recommend you book a single session with and then decide whether you want to book a block of sessions with that trainer.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    SanoVitae wrote: »
    Sadly, many personal trainers exploit this and basically act as the world's most expensive babysitters, sticking a client on a threadmill and chatting with them about anything except exercise & nutrition for the entire duration of the session.

    Lyle McDonald made a good point recently on this. He was saying that for his beginners/obese clients getting them onto the treadmill and moving was his number one priority. But it was also a perfect opportunity to give them mini nutrition lectures on topics he wanted to educate them on. Cos they didn't really have any choice BUT to listen....


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,117 ✭✭✭SanoVitae


    Hanley wrote: »
    Lyle McDonald made a good point recently on this. He was saying that for his beginners/obese clients getting them onto the treadmill and moving was his number one priority.

    Well there's Irish obese and then there's American obese. ;) Very rarely do I see people in gyms in Ireland as big as some of the people I've seen in gyms in America. Sadly, we're heading in that direction though. :(

    I once had a female PT client who was 22 stone at a height of about 5ft2. I really couldn't do anything more than walk on a threadmill and do exercises in the swimming pool. Even bodyweight exercises were a no-no and if she was to lie down on a flat bench, she wouldn't have been able to get up.

    She lost a LOT of weight but as always, it was mainly down to the nutritional changes she made outside the gym. As with Lyle, the time I spent talking to her about nutrition & going through her food diary when she was on the treadmill really paid off.

    However, people like this are an absolute exception. I've seen many PTs take slim, fit clients and have them run on a treadmill for 45 minutes and then go through some PNF stretches for about 5 minutes afterwards and that's it.

    I'm convinced they know that it's not the very best program for their client, but that they are too lazy to write out a weights program for them and go through all the exercises with them every session. Much easier to stick them on a treadmill, push the start button and let the client do 100% of the work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 821 ✭✭✭xgtdec


    I use my PT on/off for phases, i do all my own burning phases and then ill get back to the PT for the bulking, for some obscure resean asking for a spot in my gym doesnt seem to be the done thing, and ive trapped myself under a bar once before, it wasnt pretty so better with the trainer, who is €65 an hour and worth every cent!!!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 Oilibhearcoff


    Hi Personal trainners charge some crazy prices, and its all about making money, not about getting some one feeling better about themselves and achievieng their goals , iam a personal trainer in Tralee,, 20 euro per session and have my own facility. I do beleive that personal trainning has to be totally about the individual, and i dont charge ridiculous rates because quite simply people cant afford it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,538 ✭✭✭btkm8unsl0w5r4


    3 months of twice a week PT for 320 euro per month is ok, seen cheaper, have seen more expensive. If you like the trainer go for it. Just make sure you maximise your time with them.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    Hi Personal trainners charge some crazy prices, and its all about making money, not about getting some one feeling better about themselves and achievieng their goals , iam a personal trainer in Tralee,, 20 euro per session and have my own facility. I do beleive that personal trainning has to be totally about the individual, and i dont charge ridiculous rates because quite simply people cant afford it.

    You mean YOUR target market can't afford it (or don't value it enough). It's not a simple blacks and white cost issue.

    Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 424 ✭✭TheBellJar


    OP 40quid a session is cheap, it's half what alot of PTs would charge. You get what you pay for and people charge what they're worth.

    Sure 40quid would be gone 2 rounds in on a Sat night.

    If you can afford it and really need the motivation then think it's a great deal. If money is an issue, which I completely understand, then maybe look at a once off session and a review every 4weeks instead.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 424 ✭✭TheBellJar


    Oops, old thread is old.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,394 ✭✭✭Transform


    Some top pt's in Ireland charrge anything up to 250 a session. The price is only good if the trainer is. Ask for references from their clients before signing up.
    what!! - thats wayyy over the top


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 seanfitness


    I would just like to clear something up. If this post is not allowed admin or moderator you can delete it and let me know. I am a personal trainer.

    One of the reasons why personal trainers are so expensive is because they are not paid by the gym that they work in, instead, they are expected to work there for free in lieu of rent for use of the facilities. In return for this many personal trainers who have paid exorbitant amount of money (€2500 a course) and invested vast amounts of time in getting their qualifications, are often then assigned by unscrupulous gym owners to scrubbing toilets and showers, picking up after people and working in place of cleaners that gym owners do not want to pay for. Personal trainers are then expected to work as self employed during off shift hours getting clients and charging private rates in order to try make a living. Some gyms have PT's working upwards of 30hrs a week for free and work them to the bone to get value for their free labour.

    The fitness industry is completely unregulated, personal trainers are 99% of the time at the mercy of the owners and their exploitation tactics.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,387 ✭✭✭Cill94


    This is true of many gyms. I have heard that this is how FlyeFit originally built their business, and it's a popular (and morally reprehensible) tactic.

    Just so you know, there are other options - gyms or PT studios where you just pay a flat monthly rental fee and train people as you please. The rent is probably going to be higher than what you're used to, but you're at least not lining the pockets of people that are profiting off free labour.



  • Registered Users Posts: 19,410 ✭✭✭✭road_high


    I think go join some classes- some great instructors out there that will give you lots of help and attention for a fraction of the price. Often only a handful of people in classes too so it’s almost like one on one attention. That’s serious money quoted



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,387 ✭✭✭Cill94


    That's actually not serious money relative to what you would expect to pay with anyone good at their job who wants to earn a living. 🤷‍♂️ The OP is comparing the price of a professional giving her an hour of their time, to the price of access to hotel gym facilities. Apples and oranges.

    €70 for 2 sessions a week = €35 an hour. The market standard for a good PT is €50-60 per hour. That's not a lot when you factor in rent to the gym and the fact that you could have 2 clients one day and 5 the next.

    Personal training as a service is expensive, but this particular personal trainer was not. Given this was 2011, he's probably left the industry by now if he kept charging people that little.



  • Registered Users Posts: 19,410 ✭✭✭✭road_high


    Well if the guts of €1000 isn’t serious money to spend on personal training then good luck to you, it would be to me. No one disputes the professionalism on offer but There’s seriously cheaper options for training available, maybe a few personal training sessions at the start to get some one going and go from there.

    I regularly go to classes there might be 2/3 people at one. That’s seriously better value than the above



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,387 ✭✭✭Cill94


    Classes are absolutely far more cost effective for the average person just looking to get a bit fitter. No disputing that.

    As a PT, I work with people who have more specific goals for strength/muscle gain, which most class models won’t accommodate. They’re paying me for knowledge that took me years of time and money in education to accumulate, so yes that will cost a lot more.



  • Registered Users Posts: 39,326 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    That was for 25 sessions. For that many sessions it’s not a lot. Not everyone needs that many sessions, but that’s a different matter.

    Nobody is being forced into those agreements though. If the deal is crap, then pay the rent and do zero hours for free.



  • Registered Users Posts: 984 ✭✭✭Still stihl waters 3




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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,387 ✭✭✭Cill94


    RE: the pay rent vs work for free situation. While I agree that the smart thing to do is to try find a better deal, it really shouldn't be legal for a gym to have qualified professionals working for them with no pay, regardless what deal has been made for use of facilities. It's a relationship that is almost always abused by the gym owner, who knows full well that the PT is probably not going to have the time or energy after all those free hours to get a PT business off the ground.

    I would assume most gym owners have found a loophole in employment law where the PT is technically an 'independent contractor'. Not sure if it would hold up in court if you were seen to be having them spend dozens of hours a week teaching your classes and cleaning your loos for free.



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