Advertisement
If you have a new account but can't post, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help to verify your email address. Thanks :)
New AMA with a US police officer (he's back!). You can ask your questions here

Very rural Ireland

  • 07-05-2011 10:59am
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 67 ✭✭✭ Kevin joyce


    Do very rural parts of ireland have a future? From 2001-2006 when everybody could get a job places like south connemara had no real jobs.
    Tagged:


«13456710

Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,139 Jo King


    The reality is that people are going to have to start living in reasonable conurbations. The post office will soon close, the primary school will soon close, the pub has already gone, postal deliveries will drop in frequency and possibly go to the mail box system.Utility providers will be extremely reluctant to service remote areas. When the transport subsidy comes to an end and it becomes too expensive to maintain private vehicles, people will have to leave and move to the towns. Farms are increasing in size with holdings amalgamating. Soon the farmer will no longer live on his land but travel out from a nearby town.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,372 ✭✭✭ Duffy the Vampire Slayer


    I grew up in a rural area, and while it has its advantages, I can't imagine I'll ever live here again.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 19,987 ✭✭✭✭ mikemac


    I came from such an area, you know, small village but five pubs :D

    There is only one pub nowadays, post office closed and the biggest employer is the local Spar shop. Only shop in the place

    There was construction and a lot of the locals made good money labouring but that's all gone

    Garda station was a one man operation with a house for the garda but when the garda retired they closed the station.
    Well the station is still there and can be used but it's unmanned.

    Repeated it every county in Ireland. I see no future or employment in the future for such areas


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,488 ✭✭✭ Denerick


    These areas rely on farming. Agriculture is the economic activity of rural areas; forget the fantasy of planting a multinational factory in the wilds of Donegal; it makes neither economic or logical sense. Back to basics; small market towns which act as a service provider to the agricultural hinterland. Many towns lack a raison d'etre without these fundamental economic building blocks. Hopefully the global rise in food prices will help spring a rural renewal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,573 ✭✭✭ pragmatic1


    Its very sad but I think most rural areas are in huge trouble. As Denerick pointed out, the only way for rural areas to survive is by going back to the old reliables such as farming, fishing and tourism.

    However, many people I know raise their kids in rural areas and commute to city jobs during the week. If I had a family I'd like to do the same because a rural Irish upbringing is a pretty good one.


  • Advertisement
  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 536 Clareboy


    Bad planning is at the root cause of the problems in rural Ireland. By allowing widespread one off housing and uncontrolled ribbon development, the life blood has been drained out of the villages and small towns with the result that many of our traditional settlements are now devoid of essential services. The fabric of many of our towns has been destroyed giving these places an air of dereliction and decay. Due to our scattered pattern of rural housing, we can never have a functioning public trasport system. Basically, we have screwed up big time!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,548 Harps


    Yep, one off housing is commonly overlooked but is one of the biggest disasters of the boom. Most N and R roads in the country are littered with housing for their entire length with tiny, dead villages dotted about every 10 miles or so. If the population was centred around towns and density prioritised then at least it'd be possible to provide basic services. Someone builds their house 10 miles from the nearest town and then complains when theres no public transport, no broadband, no local services etc.

    We're a country with a population of 5 million yet we only have 5 cities with more than 50,000 people. No major company with any sense is going to set up in a sparsely populated area with no services


  • Registered Users Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ LG3


    defently prefer rural ireland to the city, livin in dub, i'm realising as my child gets older that, i'd prefer to be livin in the west,.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,373 ✭✭✭ ninty9er


    pragmatic1 wrote: »
    Its very sad but I think most rural areas are in huge trouble. As Denerick pointed out, the only way for rural areas to survive is by going back to the old reliables such as farming, fishing and tourism.

    However, many people I know raise their kids in rural areas and commute to city jobs during the week. If I had a family I'd like to do the same because a rural Irish upbringing is a pretty good one.

    It's not sad, it's reality. It's 2011 not 1961. The world has changed, but Irish rural communities haven't. There were never jobs in those rural communities, ask the people there. I'm a huge advocate of farm amalgamations, subsidies should only be paid to farm groups farming a collective 500 acres or more.

    Very rural Ireland has a future, but it's a residential and tourist future, we need to move past the fact there are no jobs and work with it. There are certain things dear to my heart that I don't like to see change or decline, but there's fighting a battle and then there's pissing into a hurricane.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 536 Clareboy


    Harps wrote: »
    Yep, one off housing is commonly overlooked but is one of the biggest disasters of the boom. Most N and R roads in the country are littered with housing for their entire length with tiny, dead villages dotted about every 10 miles or so. If the population was centred around towns and density prioritised then at least it'd be possible to provide basic services. Someone builds their house 10 miles from the nearest town and then complains when theres no public transport, no broadband, no local services etc.

    We're a country with a population of 5 million yet we only have 5 cities with more than 50,000 people. No major company with any sense is going to set up in a sparsely populated area with no services

    I agree with you 100%. The proliferation of totally inappropriate housing in rural areas and the resulting dereliction and decay in the towns and villages has seriously damaged Ireland's overall attraction as a tourist destination. Irrepreable damage has been done to some of our most scenic landscapes in a generation, landscapes that have inspired writers, poets and painters in the past.

    This rather peculiar Irish tendancy to want to build in the open countryside began in the 1950s when the first of the ' new bungalows ' went up. Since then, we have had decades of ' bungalow blight' and the most recent trend - ' mansion mania'. All this scattered development has resulted in a totally unsustainable and unhealthy car bound lifestyle. We are certainly facing huge social and environmental problems in this country in the near future.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,361 cyclopath2001


    Harps wrote: »
    No major company with any sense is going to set up in a sparsely populated area with no services
    'decentralisation', anyone?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,126 Reekwind


    Denerick wrote: »
    These areas rely on farming. Agriculture is the economic activity of rural areas; forget the fantasy of planting a multinational factory in the wilds of Donegal; it makes neither economic or logical sense. Back to basics; small market towns which act as a service provider to the agricultural hinterland. Many towns lack a raison d'etre without these fundamental economic building blocks
    Somewhat short-sighted, no? If we followed this advice then Ireland would have no industry at all

    Historically factories do not go to people; people go to factories. Or, to put it another way, if you build it then they will come. That is, in essence, the whole point of urbanisation. Restricting industry to currently industrialised regions - and relying on "small market towns which act as a service provider to the agricultural hinterland" - is a recipe for nothing short of depopulating half the country. Instead of abandoning small towns, there should be a focus on building industry in them to provide jobs and attract people into the town. Which is an age-old patten: small market town because larger manufacturing town

    The problem with past regional development schemes is that there was not enough investment in infrastructure; not enough planning as to where industry should be located; and a reliance on foreign firms to do the job. So instead of a coherent strategy for industrialisation, you got random factories plonked here or there because the land was cheaper or because the local TD was owed a favour
    Hopefully the global rise in food prices will help spring a rural renewal
    Leaving aside the role of CAP in sustaining the unsustainable, modern-day agriculture not particularly labour intensive. Or rather, its not manpower intensive. Attractions of city life aside, there simply aren't the jobs in farming these days to populate the countryside in the manner of the pre-mechanisation eras


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 370 ✭✭ bath handle


    Factories will only set up where basic services are available in the area. Power supply, telecommunications, transport links etc. There is an article in today Irish independent written by a woman who settled in a remote rural area 20 years ago. Her kids hate it, the place is noise, hours have to be spent driving and the cost of fuel is increasing.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,126 Reekwind


    Factories will only set up where basic services are available in the area
    By private enterprise, yes. Which is where Ireland has erred for the past three decades - assuming that foreign companies will provide everything. In reality it takes state investment and planning to ensure that both the supporting infrastructure is provided and that the factories are located in accordance with this. As it is the IDA's approach has largely been to wave large tax breaks at US investors and hoping for the best


  • Registered Users Posts: 65 ✭✭✭ madison2011


    I do the 9 - 5 grind and all that crap. Today I went to 'rural ireland' in the rain and spent time with a goat, a pony, calves, chickens, horses and cows. Came home with a half dozen yummy eggs and two chicks on order.
    Am so jealous of life in the hills. Have to make do with a poly tunnell :(


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,012 thebman


    Semi-rural life is the best TBH. Living on the outskirts of a town. Easy access to facilities and the countryside on your doorstep.

    City life is depressing TBH. I think towns with facilities in centre and housing on outskirts is the ideal scenario for most people with good public transport in the centre to get people to work. Best of both worlds.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 296 ✭✭ Inverse to the power of one!


    From 2001-2006 when everybody could get a job places like south connemara had no real jobs.

    Errr....wut? I know that remote areas of South Connemara can be bad, but in comparison to North Connemara, they've been running rings around us. From Galway city out as far as Carraroe you have IT service companies, RnaG and associated media companies, Rosaveel fishing harbour and tourist gateway to Aran. Not to mention that Enterprise receives a much needed support from the likes of Udras and there's probably more support for entrepreneurship there then most other places in the country on account of the Gaeltacht.

    And in fact, I think this is as good an example as we will have for maintaining social and economic life in rural Ireland. I've seen with my own eye's professionals who move as far as NZ for lifestyle choices, and I know many in my own Industry who would move back to rural Ireland in a heartbeat if they could work there.

    I've also seen the decline of the rural area, and acknowledge that unless some of the issues previously mentioned in this thread are reversed it will continue. But I also believe that we live in an age where decentralization, information technology, and improved infrastructure can give us the means to address this.

    Unfortunately I don't see this happening in Ireland any time too soon. Another thing I feel that is strangling rural Ireland are the cynical practices of established families in small towns, I've seen this with my own eyes and it disgusts me! Reason I suppose I don't live there anymore along with many others.


  • Registered Users Posts: 897 ✭✭✭ bauderline


    Infinitely more perplexing than the trend for one off housing is the aversion to it by a certain strand of Irish society.... really, you would think someone shot your grandmother....


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,950 Milk & Honey


    bauderline wrote: »
    Infinitely more perplexing than the trend for one off housing is the aversion to it by a certain strand of Irish society.... really, you would think someone shot your grandmother....

    One off housing has been an absolute curse. The only people who benefited from it are the site-farmers. People adopting the live in a car lifestyle are selfish morons. Overheads are being place on the state to supply them, the water and sewage services are not adequate and cannot be made adequate, fossil fuel is being burned at a rapid rate, scenery and consequently tourism is being destroyed.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 39,023 ✭✭✭ Permabear


    This post has been deleted.


  • Advertisement
  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,950 Milk & Honey


    Permabear wrote: »
    This post had been deleted.

    The state that failed to stop it.
    The pattern of development was facilitated by gombeen politicians. The state did not actively encourage it but did little or nothing to stop it. My grandmother may not have been shot but my grandchildren will be paying for this. When travelling around rural France I notice that there are no houses between towns. Villages destroyed in the First World war are marked with a sign post but were not rebuilt. Instead of three postmen having to spend a full day each delivering a handful of mail to 500 people on a peninsula, one postman can do it in two hours. The list of efficiencies goes on and on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,815 ✭✭✭ Ste.phen


    Permabear wrote: »
    This post had been deleted.

    Yes, absolutely. But that doesn't mean it should be encouraged in future.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,124 Amhran Nua


    Anyone considered the possibilities offered by telecommuting? Most office jobs don't require you to actually be in the office any more, and the number that do are decreasing daily. You could be living halfway up a hill in Connemara and doing your accounting or secretary work perfectly. It's an inescapable and welcome trend. This is why the single most important infrastructure to build up is the information infrastructure.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 536 Clareboy


    The state that failed to stop it.
    The pattern of development was facilitated by gombeen politicians. The state did not actively encourage it but did little or nothing to stop it. My grandmother may not have been shot but my grandchildren will be paying for this. When travelling around rural France I notice that there are no houses between towns. Villages destroyed in the First World war are marked with a sign post but were not rebuilt. Instead of three postmen having to spend a full day each delivering a handful of mail to 500 people on a peninsula, one postman can do it in two hours. The list of efficiencies goes on and on.

    Yes indeed, the combined forces of gombeenism, greed and rabid individualism have done immense damage to our once beautiful country. In the UK and in other European countries, people can live in villages, often in houses that are hundreds of years old. But in this country, most people seem to want a bungalow or a mini mansion on a half acre.

    My country has been destroyed both economically and physically and I curse those who are responsible. Our national obsession with building has landed us in some trouble! " Paddy the builder has dug the biggest black hole in ecomonic history". The economic damage will probably be sorted out sometime in the distant future, but the physical damage to our countryside is irreparable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,955 ✭✭✭ shoegirl


    bauderline wrote: »
    Infinitely more perplexing than the trend for one off housing is the aversion to it by a certain strand of Irish society.... really, you would think someone shot your grandmother....

    Exactly, one off housing never did half the harm that the practice of building urban style housing like large estates and apartment blocks in country villages or the middle of nowhere did. Look at places like Carraigaline or Watergrasshill in Cork - they are basically country villages with huge housing developments tacked on. No schools, no resources, don't know how the sewage system or ESB distribution cope.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 536 Clareboy


    Amhran Nua wrote: »
    Anyone considered the possibilities offered by telecommuting? Most office jobs don't require you to actually be in the office any more, and the number that do are decreasing daily. You could be living halfway up a hill in Connemara and doing your accounting or secretary work perfectly. It's an inescapable and welcome trend. This is why the single most important infrastructure to build up is the information infrastructure.

    One could even be living in China or India!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,124 Amhran Nua


    Clareboy wrote: »
    One could even be living in China or India!
    If one wanted to hand over all one's IP to the Chinese authorities or have to manage intercontinental personnel from a very different culture. Seriously, to not take advantage of efficiency gains for fear that someone with a cheaper wage advantage might steal your job is to avoid the fact that nine of the top ten exporters are fully developed countries. Even today, around a third of the Chinese trade advantage is down solely to currency manipulation, which India indulges in also.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,268 ✭✭✭ Pete_Cavan


    Amhran Nua wrote: »
    Anyone considered the possibilities offered by telecommuting? Most office jobs don't require you to actually be in the office any more, and the number that do are decreasing daily. You could be living halfway up a hill in Connemara and doing your accounting or secretary work perfectly. It's an inescapable and welcome trend. This is why the single most important infrastructure to build up is the information infrastructure.

    The problem is one-off housing has made it impossible for us to provide decent infrastructure in this country. What you are talking about would require FTTH (Fibre To The Home) broadband for each house in the country. To install fibre to every home in the country would cost hundreds of millions of euro because of the dispersed nature of the houses. The MANs is a good way of providing telecoms services but, by its nature, only happens in urban areas. The guy living halfway up a hill in Connemara should either have to pay to have fibre extended to his house or make do with a crappy mobile internet dongle (meaning he can compete with the guy in town on the MAN).

    This also highlights why we have crap infrastructure in this country, our resources are too thinly spread. We spend a fortune providing broadband, water, sewerage, electricity, etc. to every house in the country with the result being everyone gets a crap service and those in urban areas subsidies those in rural areas.

    Our roads are crap because all our original N roads are lined with one-off houses making online upgrades impossible. Instead we had to buy up new land and build the new road from scratch. We still incur the cost of maintaining the old road except now we have to maintain twice as much road going forward.

    Most of our public transport is crap because, in order to reach a critical mass to provide sufficient passenger numbers to make a service feasible, a train has to stop at every one horse town enroute. This makes the service extremely slow and can not compete with private transport. As a result we have a car dependant society who are being hammered by the rising cost of petrol.

    Never mind very rural Ireland, Ireland itself is heading for huge problems unless we change our planning policy to increase densities in urban areas. IMO we should adopt a planning policy similar to in Britain where only those we live off the land can build one-off houses in the middle of nowhere.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 536 Clareboy


    shoegirl wrote: »
    Exactly, one off housing never did half the harm that the practice of building urban style housing like large estates and apartment blocks in country villages or the middle of nowhere did. Look at places like Carraigaline or Watergrasshill in Cork - they are basically country villages with huge housing developments tacked on. No schools, no resources, don't know how the sewage system or ESB distribution cope.

    Yes, the fabric of many our traditional villages have been destroyed by developer led construction projects. Infill development and the restoration of existing houses would have been preferable.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,124 Amhran Nua


    Pete_Cavan wrote: »
    What you are talking about would require FTTH (Fibre To The Home) broadband for each house in the country.
    No it wouldn't, at leasy not initially. You can get great speeds out of wireless connections these days.
    Pete_Cavan wrote: »
    This also highlights why we have crap infrastructure in this country, our resources are two thinly spread. We spend a fortune providing broadband, water, sewerage, electricity, etc. to every house in the country with the result being everyone gets a crap service and those in urban areas subsidies those in rural areas.
    Electricity is its own can of worms, with significant government failures on that front. Likewise water is the victim of inattention which results in half the water leaking from the pipes before it ever reaches your tap, nothing to do with urban versus rural. Most rural people pay their own water rates anyway.
    Pete_Cavan wrote: »
    As a result we have a car dependant society who are being hammered by the rising cost of petrol.
    There are already plans on the table to move to a higher proportion of electric vehicles by 2020. The price of petrol is going to become less and less a factor as we move along.
    Pete_Cavan wrote: »
    Never mind very rural Ireland, Ireland itself is heading for huge problems unless we change our planning policy to increase densities in urban areas. IMO we should adopt a planning policy similar to in Britain where only those we live off the land can build one-off houses in the middle of nowhere.
    Maybe, it's not a simple picture no matter how you paint it.


Advertisement