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Medical Card Dental Coverage

13

Comments

  • #2


    yohanlon wrote: »
    Your not tied to any dentist with a medical card like you are with a doctor so can get treatment done whereever you like, however the first dentist you visit will more than likely do your examination and claim it on your card so visiting a 2nd dentist you may have to pay privately for an exam before they'll do fillings.
    Hope this helps

    Thank you ,that is good to know.


  • #2


    You are not limited to the same dentist but you are limited to the same amount of work regardless as stated above. So no matter the number of dentists you see you still have the same limited treatment available and dentists check it online what you are entitled to. So if you've been to another dentist, it can be checked to see whether you are eligible for any more work in the calendar year.


  • #2


    From what I have read the medical card covers emergency treatment and relief of pain .
    What does this emergency treatment and relief of pain actually entail ?


  • #2


    Prescriptions, fillings, extractions, possibly root canal on front teeth.


  • #2


    Would a person over 70 with a medical card be entitled to free dentures? Tia


  • #2


    Each case is assessed separately. If you are missing any front teeth, more than four back teeth and haven't had a denture made under the medical card in the last five years you will most likely be approved.


  • #2


    it has changed over the years


  • #2


    Is there any grounds by which they will cover a root canal any more?


  • #2


    HairMare wrote: »
    Is there any grounds by which they will cover a root canal any more?

    On a front tooth, maybe, not on a back tooth.


  • #2


    HairMare wrote: »
    Is there any grounds by which they will cover a root canal any more?

    This is from a Handout I got in a Dental Surgery last week:

    "Certain below the line treatment i.e. Periodontal Treatment, Root Canal Treatment & Dentures may be covered by the HSE. An application is submitted to HSE (Region) seeking approval prior to any treatment commencement. HSE(Region) will base their decision on certain medical conditions determined by the HSE."

    Make of that what you will, but if you go ahead, make sure you or the Dentist have received the appropriate approval.


  • #2


    This is from a Handout I got in a Dental Surgery last week:

    "Certain below the line treatment i.e. Periodontal Treatment, Root Canal Treatment & Dentures may be covered by the HSE. An application is submitted to HSE (Region) seeking approval prior to any treatment commencement. HSE(Region) will base their decision on certain medical conditions determined by the HSE."

    Make of that what you will, but if you go ahead, make sure you or the Dentist have received the appropriate approval.

    This relates to root canal treatment on front teeth. Note that they approve treatment based on the presence of underlying medical problems etc diabetes, cancer, Hepititis etc


  • #2


    I take it screaming the house down in pain doesn't count? Im not sure what specification of tooth it is, not at very front but visible all the same. Thanks for replies il ask my dentist first thing


  • #2


    The dentist would love to do it for you, the problem the Hse won't pay him, Hse would rather you toothless.


  • #2


    HairMare wrote: »
    I take it screaming the house down in pain doesn't count? Im not sure what specification of tooth it is, not at very front but visible all the same. Thanks for replies il ask my dentist first thing

    In the HSE's opinion, if it is any further back than the canine (eye) tooth, extraction is the treatment of choice, retention would be for cosmetic reasons.


  • #2


    davo10 wrote: »
    In the HSE's opinion, if it is any further back than the canine (eye) tooth, extraction is the treatment of choice, retention would be for cosmetic reasons.

    I think it's a canine, or the bottom equivalent of same. Pain has subsided at the min hoping this bliss lasts


  • #2
    How can I get a check up for my 4 year old on the medical card? Do I make an appointment with the community dentist? She grinds her teeth a lot in her sleep and I'm worried it might cause her damage.


  • #2


    How can I get a check up for my 4 year old on the medical card? Do I make an appointment with the community dentist? She grinds her teeth a lot in her sleep and I'm worried it might cause her damage.

    Over 16 years of age, a check is covered by medical card once a year with participating dentists. Under 16 years of age a check is free only with community/health board dentists as HSE has direct responsibility for kids up to 16. Contact your local HSE head quarters for details. Also if child is at school, contact the school for name of HSE dentist assigned to that school.


  • #2
    davo10 wrote: »
    Over 16 years of age, a check is covered by medical card once a year with participating dentists. Under 16 years of age a check is free only with community/health board dentists as HSE has direct responsibility for kids up to 16. Contact your local HSE head quarters for details. Also if child is at school, contact the school for name of HSE dentist assigned to that school.

    Thanks, she's not in school yet, will give them a ring on Monday so ðŸ˜႒


  • #2


    How can I get a check up for my 4 year old on the medical card? Do I make an appointment with the community dentist? She grinds her teeth a lot in her sleep and I'm worried it might cause her damage.

    Hi,

    My daughter also grinds her teeth. Have been back and forth to the dentist over the last couple of years because I'm always worrying about it. She cracked and broke a back tooth from it. Every time they say not to worry as they are just the milk teeth. The only time you should worry is if it continues when she has her adult teeth.

    The last time I went [around two months ago], I told her of my concerns that her teeth were really small and almost to the gum at the top front. I asked was there a shield/guard she could wear at night to protect them. I was told it's not recommended! But I could go and buy a sports guard if it bothered me so much. So, I did! I bought one online for kids that moulds to the shape of the kids mouth. And we haven't looked back. She wears it every night [that we remember XD] and I feel better knowing she's not going to grind right into pulp or break her teeth and cause severe pain.

    So if you have no joy getting into a dentist, just a thought on buying a guard maybe :)


  • #2


    Chavez wrote: »
    Hi,

    My daughter also grinds her teeth. Have been back and forth to the dentist over the last couple of years because I'm always worrying about it. She cracked and broke a back tooth from it. Every time they say not to worry as they are just the milk teeth. The only time you should worry is if it continues when she has her adult teeth.

    The last time I went [around two months ago], I told her of my concerns that her teeth were really small and almost to the gum at the top front. I asked was there a shield/guard she could wear at night to protect them. I was told it's not recommended! But I could go and buy a sports guard if it bothered me so much. So, I did! I bought one online for kids that moulds to the shape of the kids mouth. And we haven't looked back. She wears it every night [that we remember XD] and I feel better knowing she's not going to grind right into pulp or break her teeth and cause severe pain.

    So if you have no joy getting into a dentist, just a thought on buying a guard maybe :)

    Be aware, this may damage the tissues in your daughters jaw joints. It may also effect the eruption and positions of her adult teeth. Your decision.


  • #2


    All kids grind there teeth, its sounds aweful and the baby teeth often look very very worn by the time they fall out.

    A bite guard in a growing child can possibly cause restriction in the growth of her jaws and is not recommended. I know you trying to do the best for your child but this one is counter intuitive.


  • #2


    I actually didn't know that! I was just going on the advice of her dentist. Kinda lost as to what to do now! She's a bad grinder like, down to breaking teeth :/


  • #2
    All kids grind there teeth, its sounds aweful and the baby teeth often look very very worn by the time they fall out.

    A bite guard in a growing child can possibly cause restriction in the growth of her jaws and is not recommended. I know you trying to do the best for your child but this one is counter intuitive.

    Ok, good to know, never heard of other children doing it, my two year old doesnt but he doesn't have a lot of teeth yet.

    I do it and wear a bite guard, I have worn one since my teens.


  • #2


    Biteguard especially a store brought sports guard is very restrictive on a growing child, if at all a biteguard is fitted for whatever reason, the dentist will,have to bring the child back for more frequent monitoring and adjustments to accommodate growth

    However you should seek to find out if there are any other reasons that the child is grinding, i have a active interest in adult jaw joint problems and i see quite a few children who grind too, however childrens grinding could be because of many other reasons. One of the most common reasons is stomach or gastro intestinal problems including childrens gastro oesophageal reflux which is a known condition, the child need to be checked by your family GP to rule out other systemic causes


  • #2


    hi, can anyone advise what a medical card covers, in relation to an abscess on a front tooth? does it cover anything for replaacing the tooth (denture or other) if the tooth needs to be removed? thanks in advance


  • #2


    hi, can anyone advise what a medical card covers, in relation to an abscess on a front tooth? does it cover anything for replaacing the tooth (denture or other) if the tooth needs to be removed? thanks in advance

    Post#86 on essentially the same thing.

    Read th thread. I'd say your query would be answered on at least 15 different occasions


  • #2


    Does the medical card cover surgical wisdom tooth extractions?


  • #2


    Has anyone got more information on the "some additional treaments" which might be available on medical card with "HSE approval"?
    Additional treatments for example, teeth cleaning are available to those persons with specific medical conditions and again, your dentist will be able to advise you of your entitlement if this is the case.

    http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/list/2/dental/

    Are the medical conditions list on the link above guaranteed to meet HSE approval for necessary treatment or does a decision rest on the whims of a HSE deciding officer? Have the HSE been any more generous with these "pre-approval needed" treatments since the recent 2011 guidelines? Has the economic recovery trickled down into medical card dental services or is it really strict?


  • #2


    Ageyev wrote: »
    Has anyone got more information on the "some additional treaments" which might be available on medical card with "HSE approval"?



    http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/list/2/dental/

    Are the medical conditions list on the link above guaranteed to meet HSE approval for necessary treatment or does a decision rest on the whims of a HSE deciding officer? Have the HSE been any more generous with these "pre-approval needed" treatments since the recent 2011 guidelines? Has the economic recovery trickled down into medical card dental services or is it really strict?

    It depends on what area you are in, I believe it is at the discretion of the local principal surgeon.


  • #2


    Big_G wrote: »
    It depends on what area you are in, I believe it is at the discretion of the local principal surgeon.

    Would anyone have any experience of approval cases where a medication for chronic condition had a side effect of dry mouth etc. making cavities and poor gum health more likely?
    I actually can't believe how much a year on meds has changed my teeth and mouth. The medical card was approved recently and is connected to my health condition, but this is not on any approved list. I have a check up and clean booked, any advice on etiquette in asking dentist about extra treatment on card is appreciated.


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