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Starting Out - What you need to get/do.

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Comments

  • #2


    I took a kayak lesson last week and gon on fine. Rented a kayak today and nearly died from exhaustion on the water. The pain in my thighs and hips was terrible and I constantly had to stop. I could not get a comfortable sitting position and my back was also in agony, I felt that if I was seated higher it would have been much easier. Is this just beginners issues from bad posture and form? Would a boat with a seat suit me better? I am in my late 40's so maybe my body is not up for it any more. Would stand up paddleboarding be easier on the body?


  • #2


    I took a kayak lesson last week and gon on fine. Rented a kayak today and nearly died from exhaustion on the water. The pain in my thighs and hips was terrible and I constantly had to stop. I could not get a comfortable sitting position and my back was also in agony, I felt that if I was seated higher it would have been much easier. Is this just beginners issues from bad posture and form? Would a boat with a seat suit me better? I am in my late 40's so maybe my body is not up for it any more. Would stand up paddleboarding be easier on the body?


    I'm far from an expert, but I've a couple of questions that might steer you in the right direction.

    What's your overall fitness like? I'm in my early 40's (so we're not that far removed), and I spent 4 hours on the water last week, with no ill effects.

    What type of kayak were you in? I have a sit on top, which allows for more movement and adjustment over time, stretching you legs and the like.

    You ask if you should have a boat with a seat, I take this to mean the kayak you rented didn't have a seat? A seat makes a huge difference. They allow for adjustment of the seated position, as well as offering some padding.


  • #2


    I am in my late 40's so maybe my body is not up for it any more.

    I'm a hell of a lot older than you and can happily paddle/fish for 8 or 9 hours per day and do two days in row. I'm also far from being super fit :-)

    You do however, need to get into a comfortable position from the outset and I suspect that's what may be wrong. Also, weather conditions play a huge part. Paddling against the wind and/or a strong tide can be exhausting.


  • #2


    cletus wrote: »
    I'm far from an expert, but I've a couple of questions that might steer you in the right direction.

    What's your overall fitness like? I'm in my early 40's (so we're not that far removed), and I spent 4 hours on the water last week, with no ill effects.

    What type of kayak were you in? I have a sit on top, which allows for more movement and adjustment over time, stretching you legs and the like.

    You ask if you should have a boat with a seat, I take this to mean the kayak you rented didn't have a seat? A seat makes a huge difference. They allow for adjustment of the seated position, as well as offering some padding.

    Overall fitness is not terrible but not running any 5k's either. Probably been a while since I done any deent training but do a good 10k walk every Saturday monring and usually a shorter walk on Sunday morning.
    The kayak I rented was a Mambo sit on top, just some moulded plastic for seat and foot positioning. I see kayaks advertised online and they have a proper seat with a back. As I was paddling in extreme discomfort all I could think about was how much easier it would be if I were seated higher. My bum felt lower than my heels so my back was arched at all times.


  • #2


    I'm a hell of a lot older than you and can happily paddle/fish for 8 or 9 hours per day and do two days in row. I'm also far from being super fit :-)

    You do however, need to get into a comfortable position from the outset and I suspect that's what may be wrong. Also, weather conditions play a huge part. Paddling against the wind and/or a strong tide can be exhausting.

    There was a bit of a breeze once on the water and it did not help in either direction as I was either paddling against it or trying not to get blown onto a sand bank that was showing due to low tide.


  • #2


    I took a kayak lesson last week and gon on fine. Rented a kayak today and nearly died from exhaustion on the water. The pain in my thighs and hips was terrible and I constantly had to stop. I could not get a comfortable sitting position and my back was also in agony, I felt that if I was seated higher it would have been much easier. Is this just beginners issues from bad posture and form? Would a boat with a seat suit me better? I am in my late 40's so maybe my body is not up for it any more. Would stand up paddleboarding be easier on the body?

    1. Kayaking is low impact so don't worry about age.

    2. You connect at feet, thighs, hips, bum. All 4 contacts (assuming not sit on top) need to be solid and comfortable.

    The pain could be from any number of things but I'd look at these 2 culprits.
    A) Hips too tight or hip pinching nerve.
    B) Back rest too harsh. This can be a killer and whilst being uncomfortable will also push on nerves to everything below the waist leading to pins and needles and pain....

    As regards posture and longevity on the water. Your biceps are small muscles your back and abs are big. So paddle strokes should have as straight an arm as possible.

    Straight back like a string is pulling up on your head. Reach out as far as you can with that straight back. Pull through the water by swinging your torso and pretty straight elbow. Get the blade out when level with hip (not behind you). Like cycling and running you're looking for a quicker cadance with handier strokes rather than pulling hard. Pulling hard slows you down, makes harder to go straight abd tires you out a lot quicker


  • #2


    You will probably find you have a dominant side and tend to go in a circle towards your weaker side. Rather than trying to paddle harder on your weaker side, ease up a bit on your stronger side, it's less tiring. The less you zig zag, the less effort is wasted. It will all come with practice.


  • #2


    The one thing that jumps out to me is that you're using a sit on top with no seat.

    I would definitely get a seat the next time. Difference is night and day.

    You can adjust the seat so that once you sit down, you are in an upright supported position (as suggested by a poster above), as opposed to sliding around and leaning back against the moulded body of the kayak


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