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Oddities of Irish Infrastructure

  • 12-12-2009 12:31pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 3,082 Chris_533976


    They have loads of these threads on Sabre showing strange quirks of UK infrastructure so lets have one here.

    Post odd, interesting facts about Irish roads/rail/etc that only absolute nerds would care about at all.


    Heres one -

    On the old N6 between Galway and Ballinasloe, if you're travelling West to East, there is about 100m of road near Kilreekil where you actually travel NORTH WEST.
    Tagged:


«134567

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭ Roryhy
    Registered User


    Surely the dursey cablecar qualifies for this one.
    DurseyCableCar.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,781 ✭✭✭ Carawaystick
    Registered User



    Heres one -

    On the old N6 between Galway and Ballinasloe, if you're travelling West to East, there is about 100m of road near Kilreekil where you actually travel NORTH WEST.

    When getting the train south from Dublin to Arklow, the train travels north of west between Wicklow and Rathnew.

    There were Chairlifts on Bray head in the last century

    Ardnacrusha was the largest power station in the World for a while.

    Some of the houses on the South Mall in Cork still have boat rings from when the mall was a river.

    Water from the Silent Valley in Down used to flow untreated to the taps of Belfast. They built the Mourne wall to keep livestock out.


    The Sally gap isn't the highest point on the Military road, It's a bit higher further north.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,810 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011
    Moderator


    The N10 breaks the original numbering system completely, as it branches off counter-clock from the N9.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 878 rainbowdash


    The port of Rosslare is a funny one. Its run by Irish rail (even though they are a railway company) and as well as this the ownership is still muddled. wikipedia:



    Fishguard and Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company which still exists today, although GSR took over 50% of its shares upon its creation, the other 50% being held by the UK Great Western Railway. The respective shareholdings in the company, now essentially a shelf company, are held today by Iarnrod Éireann and Stena Line


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 ✭✭✭✭ Judgement Day


    Surely one of the biggest oddities is the fact that CIE has lasted since 1945 despite being a complete and utter shambles since 1950. :D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18,902 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph
    Registered User


    Some roadsigns are correct. :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,319 Trick of the Tail
    Registered User


    In Clonmel, there is a road off the N24 that leads to the racetrack, Powerstown Park.

    On one side of the road the sign says 'Powerstown Park Road', opposite it, the sign says 'Powerstown Road Park' !

    A.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,319 Trick of the Tail
    Registered User


    Just off the N25, between Waterford and New Ross, lies the little village of Glenmore, pop 2,000 or so.

    On the N25, in the space of a quarter of a mile, there are no less than 16 direction signs to Glenmore!

    A.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,638 Zoney
    Registered User


    Even now, they can't decide if it is Lahinch or Lehinch and Ennistymon or Ennistimon on road signs (not to mention everywhere else!)

    Also the old and new road signs show a continuous simplification of Irish placenames - Durlas Eile -> Durlas, Magh Ealla -> Mala, Ráth Luirc -> An Ráth.


  • Registered Users Posts: 141 ✭✭ NFD100
    Registered User


    Road signs on poles too big and half way down the pole. Uniquely Irish

    Signposts pointing the wrong way, also uniquely Irish


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,588 ✭✭✭ Bluetonic
    Registered User


    NFD100 wrote: »
    Signposts pointing the wrong way, also uniquely Irish
    Not a chance that this is uniquely Irish.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 19,987 ✭✭✭✭ mikemac


    In County Clare you directions signs, some spelling Lahinch and some spelling Lehinch.

    You'd think the County Council would just pick one!

    Edit: I see Zoney beat me to it :(
    It's the only oddity I can think of


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,376 ✭✭✭ ei.sdraob


    80KM speed limits signs on sideroads which have grass growing down middle and muck

    makes me chuckle

    399px-Back_Road_In_Ireland.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,203 imme
    Registered User


    The Lartigue monorail in Kerry must rank up there.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listowel_and_Ballybunion_Railway


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,667 ✭✭✭ exaisle
    Registered User


    The road from Old Bawn in Tallaght to the N81 at Brittas has a speed limit of 60k/40mph, while all of the sideroads leading onto it have 80km/50mph speed limits....and is a well known speed trap location.

    FFS!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,203 imme
    Registered User


    The Drumm battery train invented by Northern Ireland's James Drumm must rank up there as well.
    http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/history/drumm.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,319 Trick of the Tail
    Registered User


    imme wrote: »
    The Lartigue monorail in Kerry must rank up there.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listowel_and_Ballybunion_Railway


    Brilliant! But the question has to be asked:

    Why?



    A.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,146 ✭✭✭ veryangryman
    Registered User


    Signs going out of town showing the road name (e.g N55 etc)

    Yet on the same road, approaching town, no road name. Whats the deal with that? Not sure if that is uniquely irish either but...


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,203 imme
    Registered User


    alinton wrote: »
    Brilliant! But the question has to be asked:

    Why?



    A.
    why was in instituted or why did I say it was an Irish oddity.
    I posted it because it's mad Ted!, mad!.
    Seriously, it's scale alone, 9miles, marks it out for exceptional value.
    http://www.listowel365.com/lartigue0801.asp


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,032 DWCommuter


    And perhaps the weirdest oddity;

    There's more sense spoken about Irish infrastructure on internet forums than in any Government department, town or county council.


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  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,810 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011
    Moderator


    Coming in to Maynooth from Naas, you pass no less than four signs saying you've entered Maynooth (standard white council, Special Olympics, and two others) before then coming to a route confirmation sign saying "Maynooth 2km". Not "town centre", but as if you're not in the town at all...


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,902 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph
    Registered User


    Found this while flicking around. Never seen level crossing barriers like them in Ireland;

    DSC01445_2.JPG

    New Ross. Courtessy of Eiretrains.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,319 Trick of the Tail
    Registered User


    imme wrote: »
    why was in instituted or why did I say it was an Irish oddity.
    I posted it because it's mad Ted!, mad!.
    Seriously, it's scale alone, 9miles, marks it out for exceptional value.
    http://www.listowel365.com/lartigue0801.asp

    I mean why did he bother developing it, considering it had no advantages over two-rail systems, and several disadvantages.

    Its wonderfully eccentric though!

    A.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 ✭✭✭✭ Judgement Day


    alinton wrote: »
    I mean why did he bother developing it, considering it had no advantages over two-rail systems, and several disadvantages.

    Its wonderfully eccentric though!

    A.

    The Lartigue monorail system was originally invented for use in Algeria (I think) for use in desert regions and was probably quite suited for that purpose but in Kerry it was truly an oddity. The Great Southern Railways refused to have the Lartigue included in the amalgamation of 1925 and so that was the end of it. A short stretch of original track, a rebuilt carriage and many other original artifacts have been preserved near Lisselton (the halfway point on the original line) by a local man - Michael Barry. In more recent times a 're-creation' of the Lartigue including an internal combustion replica steam locomotive, carriages and track have been installed adjacent to the old mainline station at Listowel. http://www.lartiguemonorail.com/ The new setup could itself be termed an oddity but is not really a piece of infrastructure. :D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 985 spadder


    Broken white lines coming up to bends where clearly it would be suicidal to attempt to overtake and solid white lines in areas where it is safe.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,735 ✭✭✭ Irish and Proud


    The Stamullen road systems in East Meath - yes, I said systems!

    One system consists of the original village routes plus the additional roads in the new residential areas, while the other system is that around the M1 and City North (also Stamullen). There is no connection within the Stamullen area between the two sets of roads. To get from one system to the other, you have to go about 2km East from Stamullen to the R132 at Gormanston Cross, then head another 1km North West to the R132/M1 Link interchange, then head 1.5km South to J7 of the M1, and then West to City North Area. AFAIK, there's no pedestrian connection either!

    Think I'm winding you guys up? Follow me...

    http://ims0.osiemaps.ie/website/publicviewer/main.aspx#V1,715069,766667,6

    Regards!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,319 Trick of the Tail
    Registered User


    You get that all the time. Solid lines on long straight stretched, broken lines on bends and rises.

    A major one is the M7/M9 junction - if you're driving east there's no way of getting onto the southbound M9!

    A.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,588 ✭✭✭ Bluetonic
    Registered User


    The Stamullen road systems in East Meath - yes, I said systems!
    Not really that odd. It's an old village and a separate hotel and office area that aren't linked. One 100s of years old and one a couple of years old.

    Anyhow here's the plans for the new road.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,735 ✭✭✭ Irish and Proud


    alinton wrote: »
    You get that all the time. Solid lines on long straight stretched, broken lines on bends and rises.

    A major one is the M7/M9 junction - if you're driving east there's no way of getting onto the southbound M9!

    A.

    That's very common in other countries - take the UK for example: the M54/M6 junction North of Birmingham, the M1/M6 junction (before the A14 was added about 20 years ago), the M5/M42 (before the M40 was built - about 1991), the M6/M61 (before the M65 was built). Indeed, look at the M2/M5 junction in Belfast!

    Regards!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18,902 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph
    Registered User


    Abandoned motorways are almost unheard of in Ireland.


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