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M17/M18 - Gort to Tuam [open to traffic]

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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,481 ✭✭✭irishgeo


    jk23 wrote: »
    Anyone know the speed limit on the R354, particularly the old lackagh cemetery? I see it has been designated for a new go safe zone...

    Isn't a regional road usually 80kmh


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 877 ✭✭✭jk23


    irishgeo wrote: »
    Isn't a regional road usually 80kmh

    Yes I was thinking the same, if its set up there in the morning early it will catch alot of people going to work, its like mondello there Monday to Friday....


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,481 ✭✭✭irishgeo


    jk23 wrote: »
    Yes I was thinking the same, if its set up there in the morning early it will catch alot of people going to work, its like mondello there Monday to Friday....

    have you noticed any plain vans parked there lately . its a survey van usually looking for mondello like driving.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 877 ✭✭✭jk23


    irishgeo wrote: »
    have you noticed any plain vans parked there lately . its a survey van usually looking for mondello like driving.

    No I thought I did one evening but it was a private transit...


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,015 ✭✭✭Kevwoody


    Travel this road twice weekly and it's an absolute godsend.

    One thing I've noticed is travelling from Ennis towards Galway, the old section and new section of tarmac at Gort are now almost the same colour, grey rather than black.

    However, a few km's before the M6 junction, where I assume the two different companies met when constructing the road, the tarmac there is almost as black as the day it was laid.

    Would it be the case that a cheaper version was used for the southern section, hence the colour difference?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,015 ✭✭✭Kevwoody


    Travel this road twice weekly and it's an absolute godsend.

    One thing I've noticed is travelling from Ennis towards Galway, the old section and new section of tarmac at Gort are now almost the same colour, grey rather than black.

    However, a few km's before the M6 junction, where I assume the two different companies met when constructing the road, the tarmac there is almost as black as the day it was laid.

    Would it be the case that a cheaper version was used for the southern section, hence the colour difference?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,481 ✭✭✭irishgeo


    Kevwoody wrote: »
    Travel this road twice weekly and it's an absolute godsend.

    One thing I've noticed is travelling from Ennis towards Galway, the old section and new section of tarmac at Gort are now almost the same colour, grey rather than black.

    However, a few km's before the M6 junction, where I assume the two different companies met when constructing the road, the tarmac there is almost as black as the day it was laid.

    Would it be the case that a cheaper version was used for the southern section, hence the colour difference?

    Different quarry perhaps.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,321 ✭✭✭m17


    Mahanagh bridge 27/09/20 on the m17 open 3 years today
    pC3EQc8.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 667 ✭✭✭BelfastVanMan


    m17 wrote: »
    Mahanagh bridge 27/09/20 on the m17 open 3 years today
    pC3EQc8.jpg

    The vegetation is taking hold nicely.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,147 ✭✭✭shanec1928


    travel north bound is there a reason on the sign posts that claregalway appears only in irish on two of the signs?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭riddlinrussell


    shanec1928 wrote: »
    travel north bound is there a reason on the sign posts that claregalway appears only in irish on two of the signs?

    I believe Baile Chláir (Claregalway) is a Gaeltacht area and thus signs are only in Irish, only current special exemption to this is An Daingean (Dingle) for tourism purposes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,147 ✭✭✭shanec1928


    I believe Baile Chláir (Claregalway) is a Gaeltacht area and thus signs are only in Irish, only current special exemption to this is An Daingean (Dingle) for tourism purposes.
    That’s interesting, still looks like they forgot to add the English the way the sign is done. One would think they would just reverse it and have Irish in the larger font and English smaller.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭riddlinrussell


    shanec1928 wrote: »
    That’s interesting, still looks like they forgot to add the English the way the sign is done. One would think they would just reverse it and have Irish in the larger font and English smaller.

    More likely case is possibly someone got it printed in both, then was informed it was only supposed to be present in Irish, and scraped off the English rather than do a whole new sign


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,966 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    I believe Baile Chláir (Claregalway) is a Gaeltacht area and thus signs are only in Irish, only current special exemption to this is An Daingean (Dingle) for tourism purposes.

    True its Breac Gaeltacht.
    If AARoadwatch advertorials on RTE Radio would start calling it Baile Chláir - then would not be long before the whole country knew it as Baile Chláir instead of Claregalway.;)


  • Posts: 31,118 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    The signs for port laiose are the same, italics look lost on their own - it would be better if a different colour was used instead, and mixed case for all text.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,693 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    I believe Baile Chláir (Claregalway) is a Gaeltacht area and thus signs are only in Irish, only current special exemption to this is An Daingean (Dingle) for tourism purposes.

    I'm told by a Galway Gaeilgeoir friend that it should be Baille Chlair na Gaillimh.

    They had the same problem with Dingle - the official name in Irish did not match the local name.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭riddlinrussell


    I'm told by a Galway Gaeilgeoir friend that it should be Baille Chlair na Gaillimh.

    They had the same problem with Dingle - the official name in Irish did not match the local name.

    Yes, An Daingean just means 'Fort', the full name is apparently 'Daingean Uí Chúis'

    Its evident in the name of Claregalway, as the Irish implies it would be anglicised to Claretown, with no mention of Galway at all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,882 ✭✭✭frozenfrozen


    there's a bit of poetry in a bastardised english to irish translation


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭riddlinrussell


    there's a bit of poetry in a bastardised english to irish translation

    Not to get too far away from the topic of the thread, but I think if you ever want a 'short' version of a placename in Irish, the first thing to go should be 'Bhaile', unless the Anglicised version explicitly includes the word Town, or Bally.

    No need for 'Bhaile Chlair' or 'Bhaile Chlair na Gaillimh' on a sign, 'Chlair na Gaillimh' would do the job?


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,693 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    Yes, An Daingean just means 'Fort', the full name is apparently 'Daingean Uí Chúis'

    Its evident in the name of Claregalway, as the Irish implies it would be anglicised to Claretown, with no mention of Galway at all.

    Isn't the river going through Claregalway called the Clare River?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭riddlinrussell


    Isn't the river going through Claregalway called the Clare River?

    It is indeed, the name is supposed to signify "Town on the Clare river, in Galway"


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,966 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    I'm told by a Galway Gaeilgeoir friend that it should be Baille Chlair na Gaillimh.
    Is this Galway Gaeilgeoir an actual native of "Baile Chláir"? Ya may have one over them - they have just retranslated back the anglicized Claregalway.

    Ask them for the translation of another Galway town "Oughterard" - look forward to that one :D


  • Posts: 31,118 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    Is this Galway Gaeilgeoir an actual native of "Baile Chláir"? Ya may have one over them - they have just retranslated back the anglicized Claregalway.

    Ask them for the translation of another Galway town "Oughterard" - look forward to that one :D
    The wiki page
    Baile Chláir or Baile Chláir na Gaillimhe (anglicized Claregalway) is a Gaeltacht[2] village about 10 km north of Galway in County Galway, Ireland.




    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claregalway


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,693 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    Is this Galway Gaeilgeoir an actual native of "Baile Chláir"? Ya may have one over them - they have just retranslated back the anglicized Claregalway.

    Ask them for the translation of another Galway town "Oughterard" - look forward to that one :D

    They are local, and would now better than I.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,321 ✭✭✭m17


    The m18 near rathmorrisy new digital signs going into place they are also at annagh hill and kilteirnan
    yQLRvvV.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,684 ✭✭✭FatherTed


    Is this Galway Gaeilgeoir an actual native of "Baile Chláir"? Ya may have one over them - they have just retranslated back the anglicized Claregalway.

    Ask them for the translation of another Galway town "Oughterard" - look forward to that one :D

    I grew up in Claregalway and in school it was always Baile Chlair na Gaillimhe


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,693 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    I'm told by a Galway Gaeilgeoir friend that it should be Baille Chlair na Gaillimh.

    They had the same problem with Dingle - the official name in Irish did not match the local name.
    FatherTed wrote: »
    I grew up in Claregalway and in school it was always Baile Chlair na Gaillimhe

    Already pointed out as above.

    Official Irish can be very officious (and wrong).


  • Registered Users Posts: 130 ✭✭tharlear


    Official Irish can be very officious (and wrong).

    GORT, An Gort

    Name in Irish "Gort Inse Guaire" . It been An Gort on signs for as long as I remember.

    Are there any other towns villages on the m17/m18 where the Irish name has "evolved"?

    There are so many names in Ireland where the English and Irish names don't match, the Irish has been shortened or changed. The English name is a shortened or change version of the Irish. Even though it is annoying to some, it hard to stop or change back. Just try going to a rugby match in Lansdowne road stadium.


    In many cases the meaning of the name gets lost. However for the majority of the population the meaning is lost to them even when the spelling stays the same.

    If they are going to bother putting an Irish version on the sign they should at least try to be as accurate as possible. The only people who are reading it are the ones that will complain when its wrong.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,105 ✭✭✭cocoman


    m17 wrote: »
    The m18 near rathmorrisy new digital signs going into place they are also at annagh hill and kilteirnan
    yQLRvvV.jpg

    What are they for?


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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Thurles - Dúrlas - Dúrlas Éile
    Manorhamilton - Cluainín - Cuainín Uí Ruairc
    Ballina - Béal an Átha - Béal Átha an Fheadha
    Swords - Sord - Sord Cholmcille
    Derry - Doire - Doire Cholmcille (Doire is colloquial however, the same way people say Carrick or Ballagh for Carrick on Suir and Ballaghaderreen respectively)
    Naas - An Nás - Nás na Rí (or older ríogh)
    Claregalway - Baile Chláir - Baile an Chláir - Baile Chláir na Gaillimhe (local Irish speakers called it Baile an Chláir)
    Knock - An Cnoc - Cnoc Mhuire: the latter is always used in colloquial Irish, and from roughly Galway to Dublin northwards (when Irish was spoken natively in the east) Cnoc sounds like Croc.
    Moate - An Móta - Móta Ghráinne Óige
    Cashel - An Caiseal - Caiseal Mumhan

    And I'm sure there are dozens more examples of this. However, names do evolve. Boyle was commonly called Abbeyboyle until the early 1800s. In Irish itself, names are amalgamated over time, eg. Inis Barr a' Chuain - Inish Barracháin, Tulach Uisce - Tuilsce - Tulsk.


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